Teeny method

jfilip85

Active Member
Here in Michigan, I'm coming to terms with the fact that the traditional wet fly swing just doesn't cut it when the water is near freezing and the smaller ditches are swollen. That's not to say the fish wont take a swung fly, it's just a matter of getting it down to them incredibly fast. On these smaller trench like rivers, there's no time to make a big mend and let the fly swing into the zone. The zone is directly in front of you 20 feet away and might just be a small bucket. Think North Umpqua in the winter (except less majestic and more camo neoprene).

This time of year, most people out here are nymphing with bobbers. I have no issue with this, but just don't enjoy it, so I've been looking closer at Jim Teeny's methods. At the risk of starting a bash fest about Jim, I'm wondering if those that still (or used to) fish his methods, have any insight. This video showcases exactly what I'm talking about (short up stream casts, getting the fly down fast, dead drift then finish with a short swing).


My question: how do you get a good presentation when you pile a long sinking line/tip upstream? Even in the video with the underwater footage, it looks like an absolute mess.
 

GOTY

7x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
That might be better. I bumped into a guy fishing a skagit head with 15 ft of 12lb fluro looped on instead of a sink tip and a split shot about 3 ft above the fly. Essentially using the floating head as his "bobber."
It actually sounds really fun....almost like euro nymphing for steelhead. Feel free to book me a flight out your way, happy to test out methods for ya bro.
 

shotgunner

Anywhere ~ Anytime
I once met a guide on the Pere Marquette who did use one of Jim's methods. bet you can guess which one (smiling)

Smaller sparse flies on heavy hooks. .018 long Flouro butt section, quick taper down to desired tip dia. Modest use of split at blood knots. Upstream quartering cast, dead drift the gut ..into a 'swing'. "swmyphing".
 

JS

Active Member
Isn’t this the technique that Bill McMillan advocated on the Washougal?
Several guides on the NU used to, and maybe still do in winter. Pretty sure Travis Johnson was telling me about fishing it that way back when I spent a lot of time in the shop at Welches.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Here in Michigan, I'm coming to terms with the fact that the traditional wet fly swing just doesn't cut it when the water is near freezing and the smaller ditches are swollen. That's not to say the fish wont take a swung fly, it's just a matter of getting it down to them incredibly fast. On these smaller trench like rivers, there's no time to make a big mend and let the fly swing into the zone. The zone is directly in front of you 20 feet away and might just be a small bucket. Think North Umpqua in the winter (except less majestic and more camo neoprene).

This time of year, most people out here are nymphing with bobbers. I have no issue with this, but just don't enjoy it, so I've been looking closer at Jim Teeny's methods. At the risk of starting a bash fest about Jim, I'm wondering if those that still (or used to) fish his methods, have any insight. This video showcases exactly what I'm talking about (short up stream casts, getting the fly down fast, dead drift then finish with a short swing).


My question: how do you get a good presentation when you pile a long sinking line/tip upstream? Even in the video with the underwater footage, it looks like an absolute mess.
Teenys method was to get the fly to the fishes depth my any means necessary enough times that the fish either takes or is foul hooked.
 

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