Teeny method

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
Jim, was The nicest guy i ever met and fished with on any river. very helpful and a great guy to spend the day fishing with. gave me a handful of his fly's to use and helped me to spot fish. starting out as a gear guy (drift fishing) i never had any issues with the split shot on my fly leader other than it was hell to cast. a steelhead does not care one bit if the hook in its mouth is connected to a spoon, plug, jig, or fly. the fish doesnt like being hooked. fly fishing is not better than gear fishing. do both. in fact fishing spoons can be way more fun sometimes and more effective. Jim if your out there i would fish with you any day.
 

O' Clarkii Stomias

Active Member
In the would have, could have, should have, world, I think this would have been a great way to fish the Methow in late November-December. Especially with a switch rod.
 

JS

Active Member
I wish I could remember a story I had heard about Teeny from one of his trips up to Bristol Bay, but he’s one of those guys you either live or hate. According to a buddy he had a run in with a guide that didnt care too much for him and it blew up at dinner in the lodge.

I met him at the Portland Sportsman’s show back in 2000ish, and he was nice enough. I used to think his flies were the shit compared to my grandads spruceflys and coachmen. Now I want to barf every time I see a Teeny nymph....what a boring ass fly to catch a steelhead on, lol.
 

Steve Saville

WFF Supporter
I never cared much for his flies.....until, about four years ago, he wanted to fish for SRCs. He and Dick Segura came up from Oregon and met Mike Koslosky, Greg Shimek, Bob Triggs, may late friend Mike Hardouin, and me for a two day fish. We went to a local beach and he pulled out his box and asked me which one of his flies he should use. I of course offered my box with chum babies and a variety of others and suggested he choose one of those. Nope, he always fished with his flies. Okay, so we picked out one and he tied it on. Damn! Second cast and he got a nice, bright SRC. I have never doubted him since. He is, by the way, a very nice gentleman.
 

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jfilip85

Active Member
I never cared much for his flies.....until, about four years ago, he wanted to fish for SRCs. He and Dick Segura came up from Oregon and met Mike Koslosky, Greg Shimek, Bob Triggs, may late friend Mike Hardouin, and me for a two day fish. We went to a local beach and he pulled out his box and asked me which one of his flies he should use. I of course offered my box with chum babies and a variety of others and suggested he choose one of those. Nope, he always fished with his flies. Okay, so we picked out one and he tied it on. Damn! Second cast and he got a nice, bright SRC. I have never doubted him since. He is, by the way, a very nice gentleman.


Mark Bachmann from the fly fishing shop in Welches told me once that Jim is the best all around fly angler he's ever met. That no one can read water and pick apart a run to find fish (visible or not) like him. I think anyone who knows Mark, knows that's a hell of a compliment coming from him.
 

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
ya we heard all the stories about Jim over the years mostly negative. The day he showed up to fish the little area we were fishing of course all those bad stories came to mind. but After meeting him & watching him fish and then kindly offering to help and give us his flys made a slow day into one very good Fun day. we ran into him A few years later at one of those sportsman shows & he was just as nice & smiled when we found our pictures in his photo book on the table. I fish Teeny nymphs to this day. I’m sure you could dig up some nasty reviews on John Koenings to but just not from me as we Had a really good day on the Skagit back when it was open for steelhead.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
Thank you @Salmo_g

I think I'm realizing the root of the issue here is that I really just want to swing flies (because that's what I enjoy most) and am desperately trying to make it work in this new environment which mostly isn't conducive to that method. At least if you want to actually hook a fish.

I think that if you really want to swing flies, then that’s what you should do. Walk past the deep slots and find the water that you can swing effectively. In my experience, mostly in Oregon, there are usually some fish in tailouts. Not as many as in the slots, but no one else is fishing for them. I don’t imagine that it all that different there. If you move fast and cover lots of water you can find fish.
 

gt

Active Member
fishing deep holes for steelhead is a total waste of time. the heads of pools and the runouts are where they prefer to lie. so swing away, it is always fun even if you are not catching.
 

jfilip85

Active Member
fishing deep holes for steelhead is a total waste of time. the heads of pools and the runouts are where they prefer to lie. so swing away, it is always fun even if you are not catching.

I think that if you really want to swing flies, then that’s what you should do. Walk past the deep slots and find the water that you can swing effectively.

I understand what you guys are getting at and appreciate the effort to provide valuable input. The fact is that not all water is conducive to swinging flies in the traditional sense whether you are in WA, OR or MI. I've heard @Salmo_g refer to this water as "conservation water" on more than one occasion.

The thing about a lot of the rivers out here (certainty not all, but most) is that they are narrow, deep and woody as hell. They are rivers of sand and don't have the type of structure fish gravitate towards (rocks, boulders, etc.) in the PNW. They find deep corrugations in the sand/gravel and hold tight to the bottom or tuck up close to one of the thirty thousand log jams in each stretch. If you were looking for the type of water we all drool over, you may never stop walking on most of these rivers. It's all about buckets - getting your fly down and in the fish's face as fast as you can.

I love swinging flies for a number of reasons but especially for how simple the set up is; head, tip, leader fly and done. What I HATE about nymphing is that when you lose your set up (which happens out here every 6 casts because of the wood), you stand there for 5-10 min. re rigging the whole mess. This is what started me on this Teeny train as he's essentially using a simple swung fly rig but getting his fly down in areas that look similar enough to the water I'm trying to fish.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
Only met him once back in the early 80's. Possibly even '79 since I was fishing with a HS buddy on the Washougal in early July. At that time, I knew the basics of drift gear for winter steelhead but was finding out summer-runs were a very different game.

Not for lack of fish back then. My buddy and I were fishing the gravel bar at the head of the Steel Bridge hole which was holding a school of 50-100 fish. We were throwing everything but the kitchen sink but nothing was working. Then this guy comes down and starts fly fishing the first riffle above the pool, with a nice shaded bucket on the south bank. We watched him hook and release 3 fish in short order. After the last fish we couldn't take it, and walked up to ask him what he was using. Super-nice guy, he spent a good 20 minutes showing us how he rigged, explaining how he was fishing the slot, and gave us some flies.

That encounter totally changed my outlook on steelhead and got me back into fly fishing. The next day I was back with my Dad's old glass Eagle Claw rod, and Medalist with ancient braided DT line. I went upriver to a boulderly run (just below Doc B's) tied on a Teeny nymph, pinched on a couple split shot, and caught my first fly rod steelhead. Maybe not Kosher, but it was on a fly rod, and that experience switched me back to fly fishing for good.

Say what you will about Mr. Teeny, but it's not too much to say he changed my life.
 

Steve Saville

WFF Supporter
Mark Bachmann from the fly fishing shop in Welches told me once that Jim is the best all around fly angler he's ever met. That no one can read water and pick apart a run to find fish (visible or not) like him. I think anyone who knows Mark, knows that's a hell of a compliment coming from him.
I have no doubt that Mark was/is correct. I know and like them both very much. They are very good anglers as well as people. I will miss the Spey Clave this year but I understand Mark's reason for not continuing. Hopefully, I'll get back down to see Mark. If not sooner, I will see him at the Metalhead Christmas party. Maybe Jim and his wife Donna will be there this year. They didn't make it this past Christmas because of a family gathering.
 

GOTY

8x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
I'd just like to point out that despite involving a few of the usual sticks of dynamite (nymphing, famous anglers, adfluvial rainbows, etc), this is an incredibly civilized steelhead sub post.

Well done gents.
 

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
Just to add a bit to my encounter with Jim & his wife. The man could spot fish really well no doubt having a lot of practice doing it. I never gave a thought about the floating line split shot thing having come from a Gear fishing start and then reading about how Trout fishing guys were doing the same thing. I have for years tried to come up with a system that would as well as the split shot technique but was more inline with regular fly fishing with no success of course.
 

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