Stillwater indicator leaders

onefish

Active Member
I have just adapted a very similar system this year for my indicators. I find they pop much better with the insert and I can't see how I will ever wear them out.
I fish 30lb braid to a SWIVEL and then 3-5ft of 4lb or 6lb flour to my one chronie (BC).
I have a peg board with a selection of indicators and braid pre tied from 5ft -30 ft in length. I wrote the braid length on the indicator so I know how much braid is on each one.
You never know where the fish will be on any given day so it may take 5 minutes to switch over your gear to the right depth but after that you are good to go for the day.
Braid always hangs dead straight and has zero stretch. Braid must be cast very carefully as the knots are very difficult to get out if you get them. This system is not for everybody but I am convinced it catches me more fish than other systems I have used.
I am always amazed at how many ways people can come up with for fishing a fly that is essentially a bare hook and how important some of those variations can be for catching fish.

Most guys in BC fish a straight piece of their favorite flouro to a swivel (8lb and 10lb are commonly used) and then their favorite flouro tippet to the fly. As far as I can tell very few use tapered leaders. Heck you are generally fishing 30 ft and closer to the boat. I would say I catch most of my fish within 20ft of the boat. I fish my indicator right back to my rod tip.
I tried using braid a few years ago and concluded it was too much trouble....I also know two or three others that gave up using it very quickly...Ten pound Seaguar to a barrel plus a weighted fly is simple and works very nicely......good luck with braid.....
Yes, the knots can be a beast. That is why I have a bunch of pre tied stuff on boards that just need to be unwound and tied on. It is not a whole lot different than the old days of tying up a bunch of gear for steelhead fishing. The braid comes off the leader boards with no kinks, flouro would be full of kinks. I have been using the braid system for 3 seasons now. I don't profess to be an expert on the different brands of braid but I am using power pro moss green. I primarily fish 25+ feet of water and found the flouro got too kinked up and slow to respond to light takes.
I naturally cast with open loops so casting long indicator leaders works for me most of the time.
I NEVER cast my braid setup into the wind.
I have a box of chronies tied on barbless czech nymph hooks. If I get a knot I use two of my barbless czech nymph hooks to tease the knot out. If you get a knot, don't pull on anything, spread out the knot with the two hooks and gently tease out the offending loop.
As I said, braid is not for everybody but it does have some major advantages that make it worth the PIA factor IMO.
 

jamma

Active Member
The use of braid was initially to facilitate a more positive release of the quick-release indicator, especially for deep indicator fishing, say 20+' or more. That may seem too deep to fish but I recall reading an article by Ralph Cutter who, when scuba-diving, said he saw a midge pupa surfacing in 50' of water. In fact, it made it to the surface before he did because he had to stop to decompress.

Trout have an impressive set of instincts that make them appear to be highly intelligent but Gary LaFontaine had this to say about their reaction to intruders, in this case a scuba-diver setting up in their feeding lane.
At ~ seven minutes after disturbing the fish from their feeding lane, the fish nervously edge back into their area.
At ~12 minutes after, they resume feeding but are still aware of the diver.
After ~17 minutes, they start using the diver for cover.

Another thing he said that has always stuck with me is "Don't ask if the fish knows you're there. He knows you're there, it's just a question of whether he considers you to be a threat or not."
 

JS

Active Member
The use of braid was initially to facilitate a more positive release of the quick-release indicator, especially for deep indicator fishing, say 20+' or more. That may seem too deep to fish but I recall reading an article by Ralph Cutter who, when scuba-diving, said he saw a midge pupa surfacing in 50' of water. In fact, it made it to the surface before he did because he had to stop to decompress.

Trout have an impressive set of instincts that make them appear to be highly intelligent but Gary LaFontaine had this to say about their reaction to intruders, in this case a scuba-diver setting up in their feeding lane.
At ~ seven minutes after disturbing the fish from their feeding lane, the fish nervously edge back into their area.
At ~12 minutes after, they resume feeding but are still aware of the diver.
After ~17 minutes, they start using the diver for cover.

Another thing he said that has always stuck with me is "Don't ask if the fish knows you're there. He knows you're there, it's just a question of whether he considers you to be a threat or not."
Interesting!
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
Yeah? And I bet you didn’t bother changing out of your jammies to do it :p That is impressive low-effort chironomid fishing. And I have no doubt it works.
I have to change, fleece jammies collect too much dog hair!
Chironimid fishing by it's very nature is low effort, I have just taken it to it's logical next step. I am currently working on the next logical step which will involve connecting a line from the bobber to a bell on my boat - in case I'm asleep. After that gets perfected I'll be switching out my seat for a recliner and will happily enjoy my impending retirement.
 

onefish

Active Member
I have to change, fleece jammies collect too much dog hair!
Chironimid fishing by it's very nature is low effort, I have just taken it to it's logical next step. I am currently working on the next logical step which will involve connecting a line from the bobber to a bell on my boat - in case I'm asleep. After that gets perfected I'll be switching out my seat for a recliner and will happily enjoy my impending retirement.
I find that the guys that are successful are putting plenty of effort into this method. Outfitting your boat properly, using rods and lines that are correct, tying a wide variety of flies with a range of colors and nice slim tapers. When actually fishing you first must use your knowledge to find a good location, that could include birds, sounder, shucks, hatching bugs, other fishermen. Once located you must decide depth and fly to use. Once fishing you are actively fishing one rod and maybe hanging another one. With the active rod you are trying to determine if there is a certain depth and retrieve that is triggering a reaction. And in all cases you are keeping your attention focused on your indicator or rod tip when dangling for those very light takes.
My sounder is on all day keeping an eye on the amount of fish traffic in my area and I am always watching what is going on around me.
Yes I am not flogging the water with constant casting but I am fully engaged in the process. I would say it is a low physical effort but the mental effort is much greater than some methods such as trolling a wooly buggar for instance.
Guys that are falling asleep waiting for a bite are indeed low effort chronie guys. One of my fishing partners refers to them as "just taking up space". I find that there are lots of guys just "taking up space".
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
I find that the guys that are successful are putting plenty of effort into this method. Outfitting your boat properly, using rods and lines that are correct, tying a wide variety of flies with a range of colors and nice slim tapers. When actually fishing you first must use your knowledge to find a good location, that could include birds, sounder, shucks, hatching bugs, other fishermen. Once located you must decide depth and fly to use. Once fishing you are actively fishing one rod and maybe hanging another one. With the active rod you are trying to determine if there is a certain depth and retrieve that is triggering a reaction. And in all cases you are keeping your attention focused on your indicator or rod tip when dangling for those very light takes.
My sounder is on all day keeping an eye on the amount of fish traffic in my area and I am always watching what is going on around me.
Yes I am not flogging the water with constant casting but I am fully engaged in the process. I would say it is a low physical effort but the mental effort is much greater than some methods such as trolling a wooly buggar for instance.
Guys that are falling asleep waiting for a bite are indeed low effort chronie guys. One of my fishing partners refers to them as "just taking up space". I find that there are lots of guys just "taking up space".
If I wanted a job I would un-retire.
 

Driftless Dan

Driftless Dan
WFF Supporter
There are unfortunately very few trout lakes near my current abode (excepting Lake Michigan, but that's a different story), but I really love seeing the depth of knowledge that trout fishers on lakes have, and how willing they are to share methods. I'm saving this thread so when I finally do get to a lake with trout, I can use this knowledge. I am also going to experiment with this method for the bluegill, crappie, and other Midwestern game fish that are in local lakes.
 

Smalma

Active Member
WW-
Have a bell would be a good idea if one is going to nap. Last year on Pass during a slow period the angler in the boat next to me stretch out in his pram and soon was clearly asleep. Sure enough about 10 minutes later a nice trout began jumping behind his boat. I hollered that he had a fish but he only woke up after the resident bald eagle interpreted his sleep by swoop within a few feet of the angler in attempt to get the fish. Some how the angler manage to land the fish and deprive the eagle of an easy meal. Not sure that we can always rely on friendly eagles to give us a wake up call!

Curt
 

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