Storing strung rods

PhilR

Active Member
.

I made a simple rod rack out of paracord that goes across the ceiling grab handles. .
Same here, but with a bungee cord between the handles. I also have another smaller bungee that I use to suspend the reels from one of the child seat latches in the ceiling near the rear hatch.
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
I keep a 4.5’ length of 2.5” pvc in the back of my pickup, attached low on one side to the canopy clamps. This is partly to keep the dog(s) from damaging the rods. I fold the strung (w/fly) rods in half, with a neoprene reel cover and slide them in. I often leave a rod at the ready in there for days or weeks. It’s dark and you can’t easily see inside, and if nervous, I lock it.

I’m reluctant to leave multipiece rods strung though because I’ve had ferrules jamb over time. I have several rod/reel cases for transport. Learned a lesson once, leaving a two piece rod strung (w/fly) in one. The fly snagged and I broke a tip off. Might have been impatient, or the Jack. Not sure, but I don’t care to learn it again.
 
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Jordan Simpson

Active Member
My curiosity is going to be the end of me. This is off topic, but since I started the thread... why a centrepin vs using a fly rod? Is it more fun to catch on the drift than a fly rod? The reels are works of art, but geez... they are expensive.

I fly fish 90% of the time for pretty much anything and everything, but I 100% of the time like to fish. There are certain fisheries or conditions that don't quite work for flies as well. For example, this one run on a river I fish we call The Strip Club where coho will stack thick between a boulder and a stump. I've tried everything and anything for them, but the water, space, holding slot, and structure is near impossible with a fly. You can toss a twitching jig in there and do incredibly well though.
I also find that there is a lot of water us as fly anglers walk past for various reasons, even though it can hold fish. It might not look fishy, or the seams are weird. You can drift a pin through it and get a fish.This is especially helpful when my day off or camping trip brings unfavourable water. I can still go out and explore, try to trick a fish, and have a 'day off' with my pin rod.
Are center-pin set ups more fun to catch fish on? I don't know. Maybe? Certain fish are I think. Big bull trout are, I think. I will tell you this: the first fish I hooked on my center-pin rod felt super wierd; like fighting a fish on a broken switch rod. It was quite fun. It felt like fighting the fish on a switch rod with which the reel was in complete free mode. It really is one-to-one.

As for the cost of center-pin style reels, they're quite comparable to fly reels. That said, you get what you pay for and I wouldn't necessarily go with a 'low-end' reel for the center-pin world. I have fly reels of varying costs, but I actually use a pretty inexpensive Redington Crosswater reel on my Sage or G.Loomis rods for most of my lake trips. If I drop it off the side of the boat, I only really lost my rod which I consider a more important tool than the reel for our generally smaller trout. It would suck to lose the rod and an expensive reel. I can also palm it should I get a hot fish.
As for center-pin reels, the lower-quality reels will affect your drift. You want one that has decent or high tolerances, as well as good bearings or a bushing. Playing with it when new and spinning it will also help break it in (you'll notice that the more you use the pin reel, the better it will spin as it breaks in).

Cheers
 

Mark Kadoshima

Active Member
I fly fish 90% of the time for pretty much anything and everything, but I 100% of the time like to fish. There are certain fisheries or conditions that don't quite work for flies as well. For example, this one run on a river I fish we call The Strip Club where coho will stack thick between a boulder and a stump. I've tried everything and anything for them, but the water, space, holding slot, and structure is near impossible with a fly. You can toss a twitching jig in there and do incredibly well though.
I also find that there is a lot of water us as fly anglers walk past for various reasons, even though it can hold fish. It might not look fishy, or the seams are weird. You can drift a pin through it and get a fish.This is especially helpful when my day off or camping trip brings unfavourable water. I can still go out and explore, try to trick a fish, and have a 'day off' with my pin rod.
Are center-pin set ups more fun to catch fish on? I don't know. Maybe? Certain fish are I think. Big bull trout are, I think. I will tell you this: the first fish I hooked on my center-pin rod felt super wierd; like fighting a fish on a broken switch rod. It was quite fun. It felt like fighting the fish on a switch rod with which the reel was in complete free mode. It really is one-to-one.

As for the cost of center-pin style reels, they're quite comparable to fly reels. That said, you get what you pay for and I wouldn't necessarily go with a 'low-end' reel for the center-pin world. I have fly reels of varying costs, but I actually use a pretty inexpensive Redington Crosswater reel on my Sage or G.Loomis rods for most of my lake trips. If I drop it off the side of the boat, I only really lost my rod which I consider a more important tool than the reel for our generally smaller trout. It would suck to lose the rod and an expensive reel. I can also palm it should I get a hot fish.
As for center-pin reels, the lower-quality reels will affect your drift. You want one that has decent or high tolerances, as well as good bearings or a bushing. Playing with it when new and spinning it will also help break it in (you'll notice that the more you use the pin reel, the better it will spin as it breaks in).

Cheers
Thank you. Exactly the info I was wondering about. Saw videos of casting a centerpin, interesting technique.
 

MGTom

Active Member
WFF Supporter
We have a small house we've been in for 25yrs, so it's pretty full. I've always broken everything down and put it away unless I'm going back out in the morning. I may put things together the night before or in the morning, especially if were taking the boat, but since I usually don't decide what I'm going to fish until I get there and look not much point. This way nothing ever gets damaged at home. Also, it's really dusty here and the dog hair gets everywhere. I also don't like leaving strung rods in the wagon, to big a target and the sun/heat will wreak havoc on the gear. All the tubes used to get stored under a bed in the back room, but I'm working on a rack to hold the tubes vertical against a wall now. Nothing gets stored in the garage, it can be 110 in summer and zero in winter. What a mess 20200410_061507.jpg
 
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silvercreek

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Dave Baumgartner who founded DB Dunn and then sold it Sage gave me a bunch of DB Dunn Rod/Reel travel tubes; both single and double tubes. I keep my 4 pc rods with reels attached and lined up and stored in 2 pieces in the tubes.


 

castsN2trees

Active Member
If I’m fishing multiple days back to back, I’ll sometimes store the rods I’m fishing fully strung up, in the garage... otherwise, the rods are in their tubes, in a rod rack, inside the house...

a couple years ago, I closed the garage door on two rods I had just fished.... one of the rods snapped...so I tend to keep them in the tube as much as possible to avoid accidents...
 
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Bowbonehead

Active Member
Dave Baumgartner who founded DB Dunn and then sold it Sage gave me a bunch of DB Dunn Rod/Reel travel tubes; both single and double tubes. I keep my 4 pc rods with reels attached and lined up and stored in 2 pieces in the tubes.


I have 3 of these that will take 3 up to 10 foot rods ...... can't find the triples any more in the long lengths only in the shorties for 2 rods from sage ..... miss the DBs
 

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