What bamboo next???

Steve Kokita

FISHON206
As Alice Cooper said, “school’s out.....forever!” My brain is slowly turning into mush....give me ideas/suggestions for some crazy-assed Hotrod. Whatcha got?
 

racermo

Watch that Backcast
WFF Supporter
Play with tapers... Could you scarf up a parabolic? Sort of a Pezon et Michel approach (taper wise). How many scarfs can you put on a blank before the action goes kaput?
 

Bonsai

Jerry
I am going to as a question. Please explain what a "parabolic" is in regards to a fly rod. I remember the term from math an engineering. Wouldn't want to try to explain it now, to many years.
 

Tom Bowden

Active Member
I am going to as a question. Please explain what a "parabolic" is in regards to a fly rod. I remember the term from math an engineering. Wouldn't want to try to explain it now, to many years.
Mathematicians use the term "parabola" for a U shaped curve on a line graph. If the stress curve of a rod is of that shape, the rod is considered a "parabolic" action. For example, the stress curve on a PHY "para 14" is U-shaped. A "progressive action" Garrison 212 is considered "semi parabolic" because the stress curve has a shallow U-shape. If you want to understand stress curves, read chapter 14 of the Garrison / Carmichael book, which describes in detail how to calculate stress curves by hand. It should be noted that some rod makers think stress curves are meaningless, because the original intent was to measure material stress for wood and steel beams, not necessarily the bending characteristics of the rod.

This is all very geeky stuff, but you asked!

In practice, a "parabolic" rod is stiffer in the middle, which transfers energy down to the butt when casting. A "progressive action" rod bends uniformly throughout the length. Once you get the timing down on a parabolic-action rod, they practically cast themselves with very little effort.
 
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Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
WFF Supporter
Mathematicians use the term "parabola" for a U shaped curve on a line graph. If the stress curve of a rod is of that shape, the rod is considered a "parabolic" action. For example, the stress curve on a PHY "para 14" is U-shaped. A "progressive action" Garrison 212 is considered "semi parabolic" because the stress curve has a shallow U-shape. If you want to understand stress curves, read chapter 14 of the Garrison / Carmichael book, which describes in detail how to calculate stress curves by hand. It should be noted that some rod makers think stress curves are meaningless, because the original intent was to measure material stress for wood and steel beams, not necessarily the bending characteristics of the rod.

This is all very geeky stuff, but you asked!

In practice, a "parabolic" rod is softer in the middle, which transfers energy down to the butt when casting. A "progressive action" rod bends uniformly throughout the length. Once you get the timing down on a parabolic-action rod, they practically cast themselves with very little effort.
Tom
You said "In practice, a "parabolic" rod is softer in the middle, which transfers energy down to the butt when casting."

I wonder if you intended to say a "parabolic" rod is stiffer in the middle?
 

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