Bread Thread

O' Clarkii Stomias

Active Member
I'm still messing around with it a bit. This was the first time with the 110 wheat, and it works!
Today was:
9 oz ABC+
3 oz 110 wheat
6 oz rye starter, 100% hydration
1/4 cup bakers dry milk
2 tbs diastatic malt
About 7 oz h2o
2 tsp salt.
Mixed it all except salt together to a shaggy state, autolyze for 20 min.
Add salt, and kneed in mixer for 10-min.
Proof 1.5 hours
Dive into 6 equal parts and pre-shape into 6- inch cylinders.
Bench rest for 10-20 minutes.
Shape into pretzel.
Rise for about 20- minutes while over pre-heats to 450 degrees.
Dip in 5% lye bath for 5- seconds per side.
Drain on a rack for a bit. Add pretzel salt.
Bake on a dry piece of parchment sprinkled with cornmeal for about 20-minutes.
Get on a cooling rack ASAP.
 

Gary Knowels

Active Member
I made a VERY cheesy loaf of sourdough today.
The dough is ABC+ with 15% T110, 10% hard white wheat, 10% hard red wheat, 78% hydration.
I added 50% of the total flour weight in 1/2" cubes of cheese.
IMG_20210214_113514.jpg IMG_20210214_105107.jpg IMG_20210213_095218.jpg
 

silvercreek

WFF Supporter
My brother-in-law, John is a retired professional baker and he ran the largest commercial bakery on the east coast which baked all the Langendorf and Entenmann's baked good for New York City.

I gave him a copy of the original No-Knead-Bread recipe developed by Jim Lahey of the Sullivan Street Bakery in NYC which was first appeared in the New York Times. He called it the best home made bread recipe he had ever tried.

Here are 3 versions all published by the NYT over the years.


Recipe: Original No-Knead Bread

Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery

Time: About 11⁄2 hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting
1⁄4 teaspoon instant yeast
11⁄4 teaspoons salt
Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

Yield: One 11⁄2-pound loaf.



Speedy No-Knead Bread

Time: About 1 hour, plus 4 1/2 hours’ resting

3 cups bread flour
1 packet ( 1/4 ounce) instant yeast 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
Oil as needed.

1. Combine flour, yeast and salt in a
large bowl. Add 1 1/2 cups water and
stir until blended; dough will be shaggy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest about 4 hours at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

2. Lightly oil a work surface and place dough on it; fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest 30 minutes more.

3. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8- quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under dough and put it into pot, seam side up. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes.

4. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

Yield: 1 big loaf.



Fast No-Knead Whole Wheat Bread

Time: About 1 hour, plus 5 hours’ resting (October 8, 2008)

2 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 cup whole rye flour
1/2 cup coarse cornmeal
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
Oil as needed.

1. Combine flours, cornmeal, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add 1 1/2 cups water and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest about 4 hours at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

2. Oil a standard loaf pan (8 or 9 inches by 4 inches; nonstick works well). Lightly oil your hands and shape dough into a rough rectangle. Put it in pan, pressing it out to the edges. Brush top with a little more oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 1 hour more.

3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake bread about 45 minutes, or until loaf reaches an internal temperature of 210 degrees. Remove bread from pan and cool on a rack.

Yield: 1 loaf.
 

IveofIone

WFF Supporter
I see a lot of artisan breads pictured here and am often impressed by them. But I don't bake them myself. Being alone there is just no way I can eat a large loaf before it stales nor can I store the various flours needed without them going flat eventually. So I am stuck with making what works for me and fortunately it is very,very good. I am constantly tinkering by making tiny adjustments to an already well developed recipe. Last week I tried something different-I had always heard that you can ruin your bread by over kneading but I had no actual evidence of it. My usual recipe calls for about 9 minutes of kneading with the dough hook on my big KitchenAid mixer. I tried 18 minutes just to see what would happen and the results were a less dense crumb and a higher rising loaf. Apparently there is a lot of slack in kneading times.

My current recipe for 2 loaves is 30 oz of King Arthur bread flour, 21 oz of water, 3 tsp sea salt and 1 tsp of yeast. The aroma of the bread out of the oven is just intoxicating and that first slice of the heel with butter is never enough. The crackling crust and soft crumb is about as good as food will ever get. Add sharp cheddar and good wine and you can have a treat that is hard to equal.

I bake once every 2 weeks and get 2 loaves. Once cooled I cut each loaf in half and freeze 3 of them, they freeze beautifully. Even at that the blue jays still manage to eat a lot of my bread!
 

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