Disapearing Insects

MGTom

WFF Supporter
I was reading the latest National Geographic and the article about disappearing insects. Quite disconcerting. I've known about bees and butterflies, the glamour insects. I have flowers literally all year round and use no sprays. I quit fishing Mill Creek because it got bad but going to give it a go again this summer to see if all the restoration is working. The Tucannon has been undergoing restoration for years now and I like fishing it. I've noticed huge clamshell piles on the lower river recently.
I'm lacking some big gaps in notes from years I did other stuff than fish. What have been people's observations been regarding our aquatic insects?
 

Mark Melton

Active Member
I've been researching the Russian River in California (or a small portion of it and it"s tributaries) for the last twelve or so years and I can't say I've seen any reduction in the aquatic insects. They tend to wax and wane with shifts in the currents and character of the river. The tributaries tend to be more stable and show more species.
If we were reading the same article it was about neonicotinoid pesticides which are bad news for pollinators as well as the insects being targeted. It is also readily absorbed into soil and water meaning it is just a matter of time before we see reductions in aquatic insects.
 

jwg

Active Member
I was reading the latest National Geographic and the article about disappearing insects. Quite disconcerting. I've known about bees and butterflies, the glamour insects. I have flowers literally all year round and use no sprays. I quit fishing Mill Creek because it got bad but going to give it a go again this summer to see if all the restoration is working. The Tucannon has been undergoing restoration for years now and I like fishing it. I've noticed huge clamshell piles on the lower river recently.
I'm lacking some big gaps in notes from years I did other stuff than fish. What have been people's observations been regarding our aquatic insects?
Some longtime fly fisherman lament the perceived reduction of Calibaetis mayflies in the inland lakes.
I assumed it was due to spiny ray fish and wdfw no longer doing the pace of rehabilitation s they used to.
But it also coincides w the rise of neonicotinoid pesticides.
Studies show that mayfly nymphs in water are susceptible.
I don't know what the reality is here.
Jay
 

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