Spey line weight increase

Speyrod GB

Active Member
Looking for a little advice on spey lines. I currently have a Loomis Short Spey 41111. I have a 270 grain integrated line for it, which was recommended for that rod. It does ok. I'm sure the caster contributes to some/most of the problems. I am thinking of going up a line size. That would mean 60 grains. It would be the equivalent of a Skagit head, which I am not a fan of. I realize the tapers are vastly different between a Scandi and a Skagit.

The real question, how much of a difference does 60 grains make? I have seen lines, 4.5 wt at 300 grains.

I'm going out tomorrow to reacquaint myself with the rod tomorrow.

Thanks.
 

Bob Rankin

Tuglife
WFF Supporter
Something you might want to try, is picking up a Sa Sonar leader in float or hover. I’d go with a 10’ and they will add 50grns.

I think it may change things a bit for you, without having to buy a new line.
 

Nooksack Mac

Active Member
I have an 11 foot TFO 4-weight. It's fine with a 270 grain scandi, and a 300 grain Skagit head. (I don't remember its brand, but they're available.)
 

cmann886

Active Member
60 grains makes a Lot of difference. I have a 12’ 3/4 rod built on a ARE UHM blank. I use everything from 210 gr Scandi to a 270 gr Orvis bankshot. My favorite combination for smaller streamers #8 cone headed buggers/muddlers is a 4 wt. Rio Scandi body and a replacement tip. I use T&G casts with all of the lines until I start throwing large heavy streamers or tips and then I switch it up. I would seriously take advantage of the RedSheds try before you buy program and test a couple of different lines. All you are out is the return postage. Nothing beats being able to practice casting a few lines for several hours on several different days comparing Performance with the flies and leaders that you want to fish.

I have found that you will love your rod, whatever it is, when you get a good line-rod-caster marriage.

I should also add that when I first picked up a Scandi head for my first 2 handed rod I hated it. It just didn’t work the way I expected it to. Now that I am more experienced and match the fly to the line, it is one of my favorite combinations.
 
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driftboatdan

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I’ll also point out that the My 71111 loomis short spey has a very large grain window. I prefer the lighter end of what it can handle because I’m used to a faster rod and it seems easier to pick up the sink tip for snapt’s and double speys although it turns over heavier tips better with a higher grain head which is what you would expect (I think ). I prefer the rage heads fwiw. But to your original question, 60 grains makes quite a diff for my rod and that’s a much smaller % of total grains for a 7wt Spey then for a 4 wt.
 

Speyrod GB

Active Member
Thanks for the info folks. I did try a SA Sonar tip. It was not much different than the Airflo poly leaders I have. Most of the time I still have a tough time feeling the rod load. I know my casting needs some work and I'm sure that contributes to some of the issues.

I'm taking a chance and ordered a 330 Airflo Scandi line. It was on sale. I will find out how much of a difference it makes before too long.
 

Steve Saville

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I use a 330 gr. Scandi on my 5 wt. Z-Axis. I can't remeber the brand. Airflo, I believe but it casts fine at that weight. I do add a floating poly leader but doesn't add a great deal of weight. One thing that I have come to realize is that rod manufacturers suggest a grain window. Depending on the brand, some have a narrow window while others suggest a fairly wide window. I think you have to try until you find what works for you regardless of what the builder suggests.
 

Speyrod GB

Active Member
So much for the 330 grain for now. They were al out of them.

I do agree that each rod and caster will are different and I will just have to find what works for me.
 

Big Tuna

Member
When I had my Sage One 4 weight spey I used a Rio Scandi body with poly leaders. It was spot on. l think you can still pick up one of those 4 weight scandi bodies at the Gorge fly shop for $24 in their clearance section. You could then try different length poly leaders to dial in the proper grain weight.
 

cmann886

Active Member
When I had my Sage One 4 weight spey I used a Rio Scandi body with poly leaders. It was spot on. l think you can still pick up one of those 4 weight scandi bodies at the Gorge fly shop for $24 in their clearance section. You could then try different length poly leaders to dial in the proper grain weight.
Big Tuna turned me on to this deal quite sometime ago and it was fantastic advice. They also had some 5Wt. Intermediates that I picked up for another rod. I haven’t checked to see if they were still available, but you can’t beat the deal and the performance was outstanding.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
Looking for a little advice on spey lines. I currently have a Loomis Short Spey 41111. I have a 270 grain integrated line for it, which was recommended for that rod. It does ok. I'm sure the caster contributes to some/most of the problems. I am thinking of going up a line size. That would mean 60 grains. It would be the equivalent of a Skagit head, which I am not a fan of. I realize the tapers are vastly different between a Scandi and a Skagit.

The real question, how much of a difference does 60 grains make? I have seen lines, 4.5 wt at 300 grains.

I'm going out tomorrow to reacquaint myself with the rod tomorrow.

Thanks.
Somebody told me and it does help load the rod for the forward delivery - is to finish your D loop stroke with a vertical lift of the reel, roughly 6", then bringing the rod down along its axis (6 inches) is really the begiinning of the delivery stroke and "preloads" the rod. When I do this, I feel the rod really flex deeper.
 

Steve Saville

Active Member
WFF Supporter
That is counter to everything I have read, watched, or been taught. The lift is important, then the D loop is accomplished by raising the back stroke on a plane (not level) until the anchor is achieved, and then a smooth delivery stroke with a high, abrupt stop. It helps to watch some videos of the cast if you can do that but I think if you lift the rod an additional 6 inches at the height of the backstroke you could jerk your anchor out of the water and blow you cast. Just my opinion.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
That is counter to everything I have read, watched, or been taught. The lift is important, then the D loop is accomplished by raising the back stroke on a plane (not level) until the anchor is achieved, and then a smooth delivery stroke with a high, abrupt stop. It helps to watch some videos of the cast if you can do that but I think if you lift the rod an additional 6 inches at the height of the backstroke you could jerk your anchor out of the water and blow you cast. Just my opinion.
The raising of the reel and the first downward pull of the rod actually are happening at the final formation of your D loop. The anchor is about to kiss the surface for a Touch and Go cast. The function of the move is equivalent to using 'Drift' in a single hand cast. Not getting the 'anchor' where and when you want it is a result of many factors; line length,power in the sweep, plane of the sweep. For me, this lift of the reel coincides with the settling of the leader to the water, just the opposite of contributing to 'blowing your anchor'. Try it and report back.
 

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