NFR DIY chain anchor build for the Yak.

Jim Allen

"Fish-On" Custom Fly Rods
DIY chain anchor build with some binder chains I have picked up off logging roads over the yesrs. I ordered a 6in steel loop on line which I cut at the weld with a hack saw. I then slid the links onto the loop. Counting every 24th loop. This resulted in 16in loops hanging down. I used two sections of chain resulting in a 47lb anchor. Welded the loop closed. Attached to my anchor line with a threaded link. My final cost was $20. 20200513_180851.jpg 20200513_180855.jpg 20200513_180851.jpg 20200513_180855.jpg
 

Jim Allen

"Fish-On" Custom Fly Rods
The word on the street is that the chain is less likely to get caught on the bottom. I ran one years ago on my Willies and it worked great. Going to run this one on my new Clackacraft.
 

Zak

Active Member
I read that old time upstate NY guides would control the speed of the boat drifting down the rivers by dragging a straight length of chain, let more chain out to go slower.
 

Greg Armstrong

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Sure. I like the idea of controlling drift speed, but not at the expense of ruining habitat. You might have a banner day, chumming the lane with the bugs you’re displacing. I don’t like the use.
I have to agree. I admire your ingenuity, but how many boats using "anchors" float the Yakima (or pick any river) each year? 300, 500, 1,000?

Imagine what it does to the bottom... and the trouts food source.
 

Yard Sale

Huge Member
Ease up guys. At 47lbs this doesn’t seem like a dragging type rig. Besides, is slowly peppering the river with lead better?

loved my chain system until I left it at the pull out one day. I would worry about that ring deforming though. I just ran an eyebolt through mine.
 

Jim Allen

"Fish-On" Custom Fly Rods
Dragging anything on the riverbed will cause harm. The key here is sufficient weight to hold and not drag. I also agree with the lead being an issue. Regarding the ring distorting, it would take way more force then what will be applied by the boat and anchor line. Time will tell.
 

Thomas Mitchell

corvus ossifragus
WFF Supporter
Chain is much better on the Yakima due to the squared off chunks of basalt. That's why Red's sells pre-made chain anchors. I made mine out of a long eyebolt and some bigass washers and nuts.
I also had a steel cased Green Anchor in the normal trapazoidal shape and almost lost that damn thing twice when it slotted perfectly into cracks in the basalt. Had to go swimming both times to free the thing.

 

Slipstream

Active Member
I've seen too much rebar in Eastern Washington rivers to run a looped chain anchor. Single 16" lengths of chain w/ anchor rope run thru the end links works like a charm.
 

JesseC

Active Member
I've been using a chain anchor for the last three years or so. I copied Red's design.

Used a U bolt like this and just looped the chain through. Maybe if i'm lucky i'll be floating by Slipstream, giving him the stink eye, and loop it through some rebar.

I have a Rambo knife on my PFD and an NRS anchor rope blade mounted on the frame of the drift boat in case something exciting like that happens.
 

Kilchis

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Chain anchors certainly have their place, but I gave mine away after a few years. My DB is a 14’ Koffler I bought used. The anchor came with it. When that thing hit the river bottom it rang like a tenor cathedral bell. The hull acted like receiver and you could hear the clang of the initial impact, then the clinking as the mass settled and dragged to a hold until each link found a perch. If an errant tongue of current pushed on the boat the anchor would shift and ring some more. I suspect the racket spooked every fish for a hundred feet or more.

I replaced it with lead anchors running from 20 to 45 pounds. When they hit bottom they just go thud. Like a shifting rock.
 

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