NFR Time of remembrance

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
Not just the freedom of Americans.

Both my parents were in Nazi Germany held as slaves. Every night they watched as US Air Force bombers dropped their bombs on Germany.

I asked my mother how she felt about the bombs falling around her. She just smiled and replied that it was a mixed emotion. She knew that those bombs could end her life, but she also knew that those bombs represented her ONLY chance at freedom.

So if a 17 year old girl from rural Belarus could figure that out.

There are millions of people on this planet, and billions of their children that appreciate the sacrifice of American families that sent their children to war to never return.

The American people owe a countries thanks to its military for their freedom.

Don’t forget there a many more people in the world that also share that thanks.
 

Mark Moore

Just a Member
WFF Supporter
Not just the freedom of Americans.

Both my parents were in Nazi Germany held as slaves. Every night they watched as US Air Force bombers dropped their bombs on Germany.

I asked my mother how she felt about the bombs falling around her. She just smiled and replied that it was a mixed emotion. She knew that those bombs could end her life, but she also knew that those bombs represented her ONLY chance at freedom.

So if a 17 year old girl from rural Belarus could figure that out.

There are millions of people on this planet, and billions of their children that appreciate the sacrifice of American families that sent their children to war to never return.

The American people owe a countries thanks to its military for their freedom.

Don’t forget there a many more people in the world that also share that thanks.
Thank you for sharing this Vladimir, I have so many close friends who escaped tyranny of some sort and to a person the share these sentiments.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
My dad served in WW II, died at 84, and is buried in the MT Vets cemetery in Laurel, MT.
His older brother wasn't so lucky and died a young man charging a German machine nest while heroically trying to save his fellow soldiers.
I served in the Vietnam Era from 68-72 but fortunately never went overseas.
A sad yet special day to be thankful for the freedom we enjoy today.
 

Driftless Dan

Driftless Dan
WFF Supporter
I had a great uncle who was at Anzio Beach (and took home a war bride twice as beautiful as Sophia Loren!); His brother was in Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge (also survived). My grandfather was recalled to the Navy and served on a submarine tender, fueling and revictualizing subs. They all told me how simple the decision to serve was. They had a clear purpose and united support of the entire nation. Will we ever see such a time now? Everything seems shades of gray, but to them it was black and white.
 

Pescaphile

Active Member
Not just the freedom of Americans.

Both my parents were in Nazi Germany held as slaves. Every night they watched as US Air Force bombers dropped their bombs on Germany.

I asked my mother how she felt about the bombs falling around her. She just smiled and replied that it was a mixed emotion. She knew that those bombs could end her life, but she also knew that those bombs represented her ONLY chance at freedom.

So if a 17 year old girl from rural Belarus could figure that out.

There are millions of people on this planet, and billions of their children that appreciate the sacrifice of American families that sent their children to war to never return.

The American people owe a countries thanks to its military for their freedom.

Don’t forget there a many more people in the world that also share that thanks.
Vladimir,

Thank you for your story.

My father was a tailgunner in a B24 Liberator in the US AAF and flew in 22 missions (or 25, whatever the requirement) over Nazi Germany in WWII before being relieved from combat duty. I don't know much about his missions because he didn't like to discuss anything about his time in the war, but he may very well been one of those in the skies directly above your parents.

He was from Alaska where aviation is a much much bigger part of life than elsewhere in this country, indeed, small planes are part of the culture there. He flew in and piloted planes as a young man before the war but never flew again once he met his requirement. He also couldn't hear well and blamed the flak for his hearing problems. He was fortunate to come home but clearly paid a price.

Not to discount anyone's thanks, but your post is the first first-hand thanks I've seen from someone so close to his service over there back then and, as such, it carries a lot of weight. It was especially moving for me to read it.

Thanks again for sharing.
 

Riogrande King

Active Member
WFF Supporter
The 8th Air Force in Europe lost more men than the entire US Marine Corps did in World War Two - both horrible thoughts to consider.
My father was a bombardier. He held high admiration for the Norden bombsight and loved B-17s. That's about all he'd mention about the Big One. As tight mouthed as he was about the air war in Europe he loved watching Victory at Sea.
God willing my son will be the first generation from my family to avoid combat for the past century.
 

Sir Angler II

The Salmon Slayer
I know memorial day is a day to remember those who lost their lives fighting for us, but here is something my grandfather, a veteran, once said to me. He says the best way to thank our heroes (both dead and alive) is to enjoy our freedoms back home. Go fishing, hang out with friends, have a beer, watch the ball game, you get the point. Enjoy the day off work, remember those who lost their lives fighting for us, and enjoy a little fishin too!
SA II
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
Thanks Vlad, and all who served.
My father joined the Marines at 16, and was in Iceland preparing for the invasion when Pearl Harbor was attacked. They were diverted to the Pacific theater. Later he served in the Korean conflict. Like some have mentioned, he also didn’t tell many war stories. But occasionally an old Marine buddy would visit and I was all ears as they’d recount crazy memories. He retired after 20 years and lived to 92. I’ll be toasting him, and my mother who played in the Women’s Marine Corps Band, and my brother who was a Navy man. I got lucky and did not have to serve.

Oh, and “twice as beautiful as Sophia Loren”? Now we’re talking!!
 
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