SRC boat - how big is too big?

GOTY

7x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
My boat but without the jet.
I don't know man your boat with the jet can run over shit that is only half an inch deep. In fact I think some of those rocks were actually out of the water and we still made it over just fine. I think you may be onto something here.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Gman,
My family went through a number of boats while growing up.
I think it comes down to do you want just a dedicated boat for src fishing or one you can do a lot of other stuff with as well, like crabbing, taking the current mrs Gman for a cruise etc...;)
Not that you can’t do that in a src boat, but there are always compromises.
Glass will give you a smother ride, aluminum might be a bit easier to maintain.
I think if I was going to pull the trigger on something, it would be a hard decision.
Two boats I’ve always liked as multipurpose boats are Klamath and Lund Alaskan in either the ss or tiller set-up.
Neither would be the perfect src setup but you could do a hell of a lot on the sound with both.
SF

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GOTY

7x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
23' sea sport is too big. Thought it would be a good dual purpose boat for salmon and Cutts. But was way too big for SRC fishing. I think others are right about draft, shallow is good.
Awesome thanks. That's good to know. What was the biggest issue you think? Was it too hard to control on a nice drift on a coastline due to the size and weight? Too hard to punch into the tighter beaches/coves? All the above?
 

GOTY

7x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
Gman,
My family went through a number of boats while growing up.
I think it comes down to do you want just a dedicated boat for src fishing or one you can do a lot of other stuff with as well, like crabbing, taking the current mrs Gman for a cruise etc...;)
Not that you can’t do that in a src boat, but there are always compromises.
Glass will give you a smother ride, aluminum might be a bit easier to maintain.
I think if I was going to pull the trigger on something, it would be a hard decision.
Two boats I’ve always liked as multipurpose boats are Klamath and Lund Alaskan in either the ss or tiller set-up.
Neither would be the perfect src setup but you could do a hell of a lot on the sound with both.
SF

View attachment 242058 View attachment 242059 View attachment 242060
Yeah it's definitely more of the latter, No way would it be a SRC specific boat, It would be a compromise boat between family stuff (having a lounger up front in the bow is what The Current Mrs. GOTY would like) while hopefully also allowing nice SRC and maybe even downrigger fishing. Hence why I was curious about how big is too big for practical SRC use. I'm starting to search a bit now but most likely still a few years out from buying anything unless the absolute perfect used boat falls in my lap. Knowing the top end of my length/size range will just help me set the parameters around the search.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
Another consideration is weight. It’s hard to manuver a heavy boat like a big Grady White. Not great when you are close in and trying to avoid oyster beds, but awesome when you are racing to the next spot in a bit of a chop. There is no perfect boat for everything, it’s all compromise. The “biggest boat that fits in your garage” rule is a good starting point!
 

long_rod_silvers

Active Member
Awesome thanks. That's good to know. What was the biggest issue you think? Was it too hard to control on a nice drift on a coastline due to the size and weight? Too hard to punch into the tighter beaches/coves? All the above?
All of the above. Was always worried about hitting submerged rocks.
 

thatguyryry

Active Member
Gman,
My family went through a number of boats while growing up.
I think it comes down to do you want just a dedicated boat for src fishing or one you can do a lot of other stuff with as well, like crabbing, taking the current mrs Gman for a cruise etc...;)
Not that you can’t do that in a src boat, but there are always compromises.
Glass will give you a smother ride, aluminum might be a bit easier to maintain.
I think if I was going to pull the trigger on something, it would be a hard decision.
Two boats I’ve always liked as multipurpose boats are Klamath and Lund Alaskan in either the ss or tiller set-up.
Neither would be the perfect src setup but you could do a hell of a lot on the sound with both.
SF
Right now I am still working with my old 14' Seaswirl P14, but after all the research I've been doing the Klamath Alaskan is what I believe is going to be my upgrade. I likely still try to get the 16' footer to be able to keep it at the Pt Defiance Boathouse, but it should still be able to do the straits depending on the weather.

Another one which might be worth looking at is the Smokercraft Pro Lodge.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I did a lot or research over the last couple of years in preparation for buying my first boat. I ended up buying a 17 footer for a couple reasons I wanted something I could fish the sound in (salmon, SRC and whatever else it opens up for me). I live on a sloped lot and already have a travel trailer so space was a limiting factor for me as well unless I wanted to pay to store it. I also wanted something I could comfortable fish somewhat shallow in. I wanted to be able to use smaller launches potentially. I also wanted something I could potentially launch solo. Finally, I wanted my wife to be comfortable in it all day as well be comfortable piloting it (while I fish :)). It will limit the weather and water I can fish but to me a 17 foot fiberglass boat was the sweet spot based on my research and what I wanted to do with it. I considered 19 for a bit but decided it still would not give me safe access to much additional water and could limit me on stuff I would want to fish. In the end. If I want to go out in big water, I’ll pay a pro to take me. Who knows, someday maybe I’ll step up to something bigger. The North Pacific is no joke though and as someone who did not have boats growing up and has limited experience, I’m not sure even if I bought something bigger it would be smart for me to venture out in that water at this point. Maybe some day.
 

sroffe

Active Member
17 to 23 foot center console Grady. That's the ticket
I like his thinking. My father had an 18 foot and fished cutties out of it. He wished he'd have a 21'.

I like Stonefish's idea of the 16-19 foot Lund tiller skill. Alumaweld makes a nice skiff too with tiller. I like the open dance floor, no CC that gets in the way. But,... 16-19 foot tiller skiff would be a big improvement to the 14 foot tiller skiff I'm using now so,...
 

ffb

Active Member
I just picked up a 15ft Tiderunner CC on Craigslist after browsing around for a while. It will be good for 1-2 people fly fishing at a time, but I could definitely see the advantage of an extra couple feet to be able to make room for another person. One pro of this particular boat is it has a nice deep v and handles rougher water like a champ for a small boat, but is still nice and light and doesn't draft too much in shallower water. For me at least, being able to launch and retrieve solo was my biggest selling point.
 

mtskibum16

Active Member
I don't think tiller is the way to go for SRC or near shore salmon. IMO a standing console (side or center) is ideal for navigating and looking for fish while doing this fishing. Especially if you're operating solo and don't have someone in the bow scoping things out. In 16'+ boats I don't find a console to really be in the way while fishing.
 

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