SRC boat - how big is too big?

Rob Ast

Active Member
I have a 17' Triumph center console. Roto-molded plastic (like a kayak). Great for 1-2 people, can handle 3 for family cruising or gear. Front casting deck has a cushion for lounging on family days. Seat back can be flipped to make a lean bar for standing. If the water is too rough for this boat I likely don't want to be out in it anyway. (BTW, this is the same model Nick Clayton uses to guide out of)
IMG_9896.JPG
 

mtskibum16

Active Member
I have a 20' tiller. I stand and drive it. You can mooch three but fly fish two at the same time.
You can do the same on a 17' console boat and a 20' CC would be awesome for that. I've spent lots of time on that format fly fishing two plus boat operator. And I still think nothing beats a console with a higher POV out on the water. Tiller does free up some deck space and there's less to think about when casting, but adjusting to a CC is not really a big deal.
 

c-dawg

Active Member
WFF Supporter
...what The Current Mrs. GOTY would like.
This makes a huge difference when boat shopping. If you go into it wanting a boat for family fun, there are a lot of compromises one makes, and even sacrificing some ideal fishing capability. It kinda comes down to: do you want a boat for family activities that you can fish out of, too, or do you want one for fishing that you can take that family out once in awhile.

If you do stumble upon a great deal on a larger boat (<20') consider a dinghy capable of taking the family ashore to do some clamming, and to fish for SRC with the big boat being the mother ship.
 

sroffe

Active Member
I like a tiller for more than deck space but that is one of the big benefits. I don't think my boat is in the running anyhow as it is lacking cushy bowrider aspect.
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No wonder you have to stand while driving the boat, you have no seats... :) I like the dance floor. You wear hearing protection driving that thing???

I appreciate mtskibum's point a view, standing at a CC does give you a better view of the water. I think another consideration to a Center Console is weight distribution. When running you're weight will be more in the center of the boat. It's a little easier getting up on a plane, and you're not driving blind from throttling up to the point the bow settles down in the water after you get up to speed.
 

Scudley Do Right

Active Member
No wonder you have to stand while driving the boat, you have no seats... :) I like the dance floor. You wear hearing protection driving that thing???

I appreciate mtskibum's point a view, standing at a CC does give you a better view of the water. I think another consideration to a Center Console is weight distribution. When running you're weight will be more in the center of the boat. It's a little easier getting up on a plane, and you're not driving blind from throttling up to the point the bow settles down in the water after you get up to speed.
There are seats, just store them out of the boat. It's a 2 stroke but not too loud. The bow drops just as fast as you can twist the throttle. It gets on plane quicker than my old Lund with a 90hp but the Lund had a higher top speed.
 

Slipstream

Active Member
Does or has anyone run a Clackacraft 17' Power Drifter in Puget Sound? Just curious. I only fished the salt a few times with a friend around Fox Island. I spotted my Bayrunner at Sequim Marina in '88 and fell in love with it. I saw a Klamath 16 Explorer at a Portland area dealer and if I thought I would live and fish another 20 years I probably would have a new boat!
 

Smalma

Active Member
SF-
I have the first lund (Alaskan 16 foot) shown in your earlier post. I coupled it with a bow mount electric (80# riptide) with a foot pad. Have had it since 2004 and other than re-powering have not seen a need modified it. Extremely pleased with its performance and tow it with my Ford Ranger.

Certainly works for cutts and a variety of other fishing options with no problems beaching if needed.

Curt
 

Creatch'r

Tin Foil Time
SF-
I have the first lund (Alaskan 16 foot) shown in your earlier post. I coupled it with a bow mount electric (80# riptide) with a foot pad. Have had it since 2004 and other than re-powering have not seen a need modified it. Extremely pleased with its performance and tow it with my Ford Ranger.

Certainly works for cutts and a variety of other fishing options with no problems beaching if needed.

Curt
we had the smokercraft version of that boat, I believe it was the Lodge SS in the early 2000’s and it was a great boat. Even took it to sekiu. Before I could drive that was the only boat my dad ever let me take solo and I loved that boat. The only boat I loved more was our 16’ Arima Sea Sprinter. But it was terrible for fly fishing. But that boat fought above its weight class for downrigger fishing the sound and we had several larger boats throughout the years but the Arima was the king.
 

Speyrod GB

Active Member
My SRC/tiger muskie boat is a 14.5 Alumacraft with a tiller mount. There is a small raised deck in the bow that I usually stand on. The fly line still manages to grab my feet. The deck is very open, which is one of the reasons I bought it. It served me well in the south sound and occasionally on the canal.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Does or has anyone run a Clackacraft 17' Power Drifter in Puget Sound? Just curious. I only fished the salt a few times with a friend around Fox Island. I spotted my Bayrunner at Sequim Marina in '88 and fell in love with it. I saw a Klamath 16 Explorer at a Portland area dealer and if I thought I would live and fish another 20 years I probably would have a new boat!
I saw one of the Power Drifter's on a big river. What a great boat for big rivers and being able to get upstream.

I don't see why this wouldn't work for the Sound or Canal - downside might be wind and the kite effect on the gunnels. I like the readily available oars and on one stretch of Hood Canal that almost always seems to hold fish when the tide is running, the oars would keep the boat in fish water a lot longer than the way we fish (three guys in a 14 foot boat). Of course, this also means one person isn't fishing.
 

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