Newbie saltwater question

CrashF

New Member
I'm just a few months into fly fishing and having a blast. So far I've only done freshwater rivers/creeks and some lakes. I'm taking a camping trip at Belfair State Park mid June and plan to try a little fishing on the two mission creeks, but since it's right on saltwater, wondered if there's something I could fish for with just waders, no boat. I have both 5wt and 7wt single hand rods, but no idea what type of fish might be there. Any suggestions on what I could fish for, and what type rod (5 or 7), fly line (floating or sinking) and flies might be good to try out. And any tips on technique for where to cast, since the salt water won't have the same clues about fish locations (i.e. riffles, pools). Even if it might not be a good time for productive fishing, I'd still like to get the first saltwater experience.

Thanks for your help (and patience) with a brand new fly fisher!
 

Jake

Active Member
Sea run cutthroat (search this website) are a good beach fishery, especially in that general area. Resident coho are a possibility as well. The 5wt and the 7wt are great sizes for them.

I only know a little compared to many of the folks on here, but Ollala is a Purdy good place. But staying at Belfair State Park is also good place to start, in my opinion, as there’s a beach right there.
 
Last edited:

c-dawg

WFF Supporter
Do a search here for searun cutthroat or SRC and you'll be reading from now until you leave for your trip. Give Puget Sound Fly Co. a call and they can set you up with the flies you'll need. That 5wt will do you fine.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
I'm just a few months into fly fishing and having a blast. So far I've only done freshwater rivers/creeks and some lakes. I'm taking a camping trip at Belfair State Park mid June and plan to try a little fishing on the two mission creeks, but since it's right on saltwater, wondered if there's something I could fish for with just waders, no boat. I have both 5wt and 7wt single hand rods, but no idea what type of fish might be there. Any suggestions on what I could fish for, and what type rod (5 or 7), fly line (floating or sinking) and flies might be good to try out. And any tips on technique for where to cast, since the salt water won't have the same clues about fish locations (i.e. riffles, pools). Even if it might not be a good time for productive fishing, I'd still like to get the first saltwater experience.

Thanks for your help (and patience) with a brand new fly fisher!
As a north sounder, I wouldn't try to give you beach locations to try, others will. But there's a wealth of IMF on Sea Run Cutthroat (src) beach fishing.on this forum. I think your 5wt with a floating line or clear intermediate will work most times. If your search casting, fan cast, first shallow on both sides. Resist the urge to cast to Japan. No hooks bigger than #4.Use best handling and release practices and enjoy your surroundings. I hope you really enjoy the beach fishing.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Not a great beach but you can catch some cutts there.
Good tidal movement will help increase your success.
Tides the 13th and 14th aren’t very good but the 20th and 21st are excellent if you’ll be there over the weekend.

Since this will be your first time beach fishing the salt, do you have a stripping basket?
Have fun.
SF
 

jasmillo

WFF Supporter
It would not be my first choice in the area but worth fishing if you are camping there. Concentrate on the point for the best shot at SRC. It will be obvious what I mean when you get there. Good luck. Also, I would fish a floater or an intermediate line at that location.
 
Last edited:

SinglehandJay

Misanthropist
Just walk the shorelines of beaches that are rocky or have clam beds. Try not to focus on sandy sections. Use clouser type flies on a floating line. If you have a stripping basket don't forget it. Don't really need to look for rolling fish just work the beach like a grid starting close and working out. I try to focus on incoming tides and look for bait fish to be pushed into shore pockets and concentrate on casting around them. Use your 5wt. If you get to see the ground structure when the tide is out look for sharp drops or boulders further out. You can drive that road around where you're going to be and find other beach spots too. Good luck
 

Upton O

Blind hog fisherman
I took a “Fly fishing Puget Sound” class from a local Seattle fly shop. It was an excellent introduction to fishing the salt and the two day class, including field trip, was well worth the cost ($100 if I remember correctly). . They also offered a number of resources for researching good access points for beach fishing. I won’t mention the shop here since they may not be a WFF sponsor. Do a search, you’ll find stuff.
 

Steve Saville

WFF Supporter
Get a map. Study the tides. Use Google Earth. Scout out beaches at low tide so you know where the terrain features are. Keep at it until you have success. It doesn't come in a day.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top