Summer job

Nick Clayton

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
Thought I'd throw this up in case anyone is interested in a summer job, or maybe has a family member or knows someone who may be interested.

Looking for one more deckhand in Westport. Not for the weak of heart or those who can't dedicate their summer, but its not without its perks. Be on the ocean every day, helping people catch fish. Lots of work, but a ton of fun. Plus you'd get to work with me, and Im not a screamer ;)


Anyone interested send an email to the email address in the post below. Anyone has any questions feel free to hit me up. I decked for 3 years for this company. They are incredible to work for and are truly the best in the business

 

roadglideguy

Active Member
Damn I wish I did this before I had a kid. And I also wish I didn’t get sea sick like a wuss:(.
"Feeding the fish" and a "technicolor yawn" are not signs of being a wuss...it is the sign of someone with a "sophisticated", "sensitive" vestibular system...I cannot tell you how many times I have been sea sick...throw in the smell of diesel and I can puke on the way to the boat... lol!
 

Mark Dankel

Active Member
Damn I wish I did this before I had a kid. And I also wish I didn’t get sea sick like a wuss:(.
Johnathon: Mal de mer (sea sickness) is not permanent. Same for air sickness. You just have to toss your lunch enough times for your sense of balance to become accustomed to the difference between what your eyes say about the horizon and what your vestibular feedback is. When I first began learning to fly aerobatics, I either got sick or near to every damn time we went up. And then one day I didn't. And little by little, loops, rolls, and the rest didn't bother me at all. Same with going to sea. Barfed halfway from San Francisco to Hawaii on a sailboat, and then it went away. Funny thing about that - when we put into Honolulu and I was on solid land, I felt a little "sea sick." I guess my sense of balance had become used to rolling about on the waves and solid ground felt, well, weird. But I have seen even seasoned Navy men with decades at sea turn a little green around the gills when the bow was awash in green water.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
Going out over the bar at Westport was a little rough one time. And trying to get out at Willapa Bay was a no go. I never got sea sick but my Buddy sure turned green. The funny thing was going out at Ilwaco the bar was flat going and coming.
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
Choppy water was my preference versus a lulling slow up and down. The bar at Westport could be an amazing show when angry, thought it was fun until a couple times I remember over the years of looking to see my charter boat great uncle skipper, looking a tad big eyed and serious..then I
went and grabbed a more solid hold.
 

Steve Saville

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I started using a patch several years ago. They work well for me and since I started, I haven't been sick. The Columbia River bar is a tough path from time to time but it's usually farther out in the big rollers and the diesel fumes that did me in.
 

Nick Clayton

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
Sea sicknesses is definitely an issue, though most people who take a job like this and are prone to it are able to get over it within a handful of trips. Your body eventually adjusts. Ive been very fortunate in that regard. Ive never been sea sick. It sure looks miserable.


Just to sweeten the pot, this isn't exclusively gear fishing. My boat has a decent amount of albacore fly trips on the books this summer :)
 

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