Kayak fishing yes or no? Pedals?

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Josh,
You might also look at something like an Outcast Commander based on your comments.
It gives you the best of both worlds as far as both leg and oar power.
I bought a used one from a forum member for $500.
The more I use it the more I like it.
New ones are about $1K.
I see my Super Fat Cat getting no more use since I bought this.
Just another option besides a kayak to consider.
SF
 

Krusty

Outta Here
Basically all of my fishing is from kayaks. I've got three SOTs, different sizes, set up for flyfishing. None are pedal. I could care less about cruising through weeds to get to good water. I anchor up (a bow or stern Scotty anchor mount makes that very fast and easy) or set up planned multiple drifts if it's windy. I know I'd be spending a lot of time clearing the propulsion system of weeds in a lot of the lakes I fish...or clobbering the drive unit on rocks.

SOT's are comfortable (especially in the colder seasons), extremely stable, present a low wind profile, and you can cover a lot of water easily. I'm convinced fish pay no attention to the kayak...it's a stealth fishing vehicle.

A good paddle, like a carbon fiber Werner, makes a world of difference in reducing fatigue.
 
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bakerite

Active Member
I have 2 sit-in Kayaks I bought for my wife. They are great for bird watching and cruising around lakes, but don't offer the kind of line control I have in a tube or my Gig-bob. I find I'm always having to correct for the wind and that the boat is in the way a bit for casting. I think a Bass Boat would work for me, but it's out of the picture money wise. I catch fish just hanging a fly off the back of the Kayak and trolling. I have been thinking of loading my fat cat on the back of our bigger kayak to take it to the good end of a reservoir I fish. It will be faster than rowing a half mile.
 

tumblefly

Active Member
I have an older Hobie Revolution 13'. I love it. I can't stand up on it but I can haul butt getting around.
Pretty much troll or anchor and cast. No reverse on mine. there is a paddle on board when I need it.
I have it set up with three rod holders and a depth finder. When fishing lakes and trolling what ever speed I want, my hands are on the fly rod resulting in a very high percentage of fish caught vs lost. this is not the case with a pontoon being rowed. You cannot react fast enough on the hit.
The wind is not a problem for me like people have with pontoons or float tubes.
The only advantage with a tube or pontoon is maneuvering and casting to the bank. I really don't see a lot of folks doing this on the lakes.
It is heavy so I use a Thule hullivator to get it on top of my honda pilot. I put it on a little cart if I have a ways to go to the water.
You could probably find a used one if you look.
New ones are $$$
 

Philonius

WFF Supporter
I had an early generation (non reversable drive) Hobie Sport for a while. I liked that it was pretty cheap, and light enough for an old guy like me to roof rack by myself, and it got around quite well. Of course, having both hands free to fish is a big plus.However, without the reverse drive, it was difficult to maintain position with any kind of wind, waves, or current. Plus, being a small boat without stand up capability and a very low seat position, it was pretty difficult to cast from effectively. Ultimately, it just wasn't that comfortable for me and I sold it. I now have a canoe that I keep down at a friend's house in Oly-town; it's more comfortable, but still has disadvantages. If I was going to buy another boat, I think the Outcast Commander might really be the ticket. Pedal drive kayaks are great in a lot of respects, but for me it would require one of the bigger platforms- which are spendy, and not particularly car-toppable.
 

Jiminsandiego

Active Member
I agree with everything Krusty wrote in post #32. For me the beautiful thing about a kayak is the simplicity. Peddles, chains, under water paddles..... ugggghh. Surely there are times when these systems shine. But until the advantages becomes apparent I would say get a sit on top kayak and go fishing...I fished from a boat for decades in kelp beds, but when I went out in a kayak things changed. The fish would strike right next to my kayak (less then an inch). I never saw that in a boat. Also trolling slowly (less then one knot) is possible with a kayak (not possible with a power boat). When any vessel is anchored, a hooked fish has a good chance to wrap up on some rocks and get away. Hooked from a kayak and that situation is minimized because you can "follow" the fish. Forty pound fish on ten pound test line....only from a kayak.
 

jasmillo

WFF Supporter
I have an Old Town Predator. Great stability, great cockpit for fly fishing but I wish I had purchased a pedal boat. I fish the sound with it mostly and keeping in position with both current and wind to contend with is tough. Seems like I spend about as much time positioning the boat as I do fishing a lot of the time.
 

[email protected]

Active Member
A few weeks ago at Drano while Chinook fishing there were two motorized kayaks trolling. Not sure of brand name but it was pretty windy and they had it dialed in. Not sure where the battery was located but there was no pedaling/paddling (or catching for that matter). They looked just like a pedaled hobie but had wiring to the back of kayak??
 

Josh

dead in the water
WFF Moderator
They looked just like a pedaled hobie but had wiring to the back of kayak??
Yeah, there are a few different kayak brands that have options to setup trolling motors. A couple (like the nucanoe @b_illymac has) can even rock a small gas outboard, which just seems silly to me. But whatever works for your particular situation I guess.

I'm pretty sure that paddle or pedal is the direction I'm going for the moment.
 

Krusty

Outta Here
Yeah, there are a few different kayak brands that have options to setup trolling motors. A couple (like the nucanoe @b_illymac has) can even rock a small gas outboard, which just seems silly to me. But whatever works for your particular situation I guess.

I'm pretty sure that paddle or pedal is the direction I'm going for the moment.
There are adjustable electric motor mounts that will fit most any kayak with the two rod wells behind the cockpit (most fishing SOT's have such rod wells, which are obviously useless for flyrods...though I suppose a two hander would work).

When selecting a SOT be sure to get more weight capacity than you may think you need...your weight plus gear and a safety margin for plenty of buoyancy. A loaded SOT sitting deep in the water will constantly have water coming up the scuppers into the cockpit.
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
WFF Supporter
Have a native watercraft ultimate 12 with anchor trolly. I use it on lakes, estuaries and on quiet days on the sound. It's a tandem hull design you can stand in, which I do. I end up paddling a lot, a stable platform makes for a slow paddling yak, but over time i became upper body and back fit. Not like Lou Ferrigno but I am no longer as ectomorphic. Getting a stretch in while standing and casting feels damn good after a long paddle. Like Krusty said, if you do paddle, buy a really good paddle. Plus do some daily exercises to keep your paddle and lifting muscles good. I have been in a few situations where wind and tide necessitated a solid burn to get into safer water. Without being fit I would have had to wait out some tides or figure a much longer backcurrent route or fashion a cheap ass sail like Hanks in Castaway. I saw two peddle guys coming back in from Puget Sound the other day, they looked exhausted, plus they were going against the tide to get back to the launch. If you get the peddle drive, get peddle fit and regardless of what you do know your tides and wind forecast....
 
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Beflyguy

New Member
I have fished out of just about everything but recently have been using an older Hobie Mirage that I have fitted with a 180 pedal drive with reverse bought on Craiglist. I've just used it on the smallish lake I live on but it has worked well to get around quickly but also to drag a fly when in reverse. The only thing I disliked was having to free up one hand to operate the rudder with small corrections to keep a straight line. Last week I made a small modification to the drive fins and with this change I can make small corrections with just the pedals. It's pretty ideal now.
I decided to buy one of the new Hobie 360 kayaks after watching a few videos showing them going forwards, backwards and sideways. Should be getting the boat in the next week or two and testing it out. The only thing I'm less than excited about is the hull weight of 110lbs.
 

Josh

dead in the water
WFF Moderator
I decided to buy one of the new Hobie 360 kayaks after watching a few videos showing them going forwards, backwards and sideways.

That 360 drive is really cool. I've watched some of those videos as well.

Last week I made a small modification to the drive fins and with this change I can make small corrections with just the pedals. It's pretty ideal now.

I'm pretty curious as to what this mod consists of. Care to share any photo?
 

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