NFR Grizzly Bears

Swimmy

I have an amazing collection of fishing shirts
WFF Supporter
What, you don't like spinning donuts down the river?
Yeah. No.

It is more than that. I have friends who I've worked with for years on rowing. I ride 'em pretty hard to the point that sometimes my wife thinks I'm an asshole. But as a result their skills have improved and they have become decent rowers.

What melts me off is when they lose focus. You end up over-correcting....too close, too far, too close, etc. Or the line of the boat is not the right distance from the bank which changes depending on speed of the current. I can absolutely tell if the distance is correct just by watching my fisher. They don't have to say anything. Also, if the oars are out of the water and the boat is picking up momentum I will absolutely say something.

When I row, the oars are very seldom out of the water. Even if I'm not pulling, I'm always making small corrections. The crab stroke is absolutely necessary. If you don't know this move learn it. It is impossible to be a strong rower for a fisher without it.

I take great pride in my rowing. I want the fishers to have the best and most comfortable experience. There are a lot of times that I can keep the fisher on a drift w/o ever having to recast. Remember, we aren't there to catch owls. Keep that fly in the water.

I expect my partners to have the same commitment. There are few things more annoying than having to constantly provide feedback to the rower. I just want to fish.

With that said, there are exceptions. My wife is learning how to row and I'm more forgiving and patient. But besides her, I'm not really interested in teaching new folks. It takes a lot of time and energy. You want to learn how to row? Do what I did and go buy a boat, learn, then get back to me.

See, I turn into a Karen


Not only does it stress me out and it can be extremely dangerous.

 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
So tell us the truth Salmo...how many flies did Swimmy leave in the willows? His arsenal would indicate he anticipates quite a few. ;)
Only a couple since he spends the most time on the sticks. To say Swimmy is a good oarsman is an understatement. One afternoon I lost 3 salmon fly patterns in quick succession. Even with an expert oarsman, the distance from casting position to the bank is constantly changing. There is only so much one can do, even as an expert oarsman. Making rapid adjustments on the move is key to maximum presentation in this style of fishing. It's a lot like hopper season: a hopper 2" from the bank is far more likely to get eaten than one 2' from the bank.
 

Jojo

Trout Thank Me
WFF Supporter
Yeah. No.

It is more than that. I have friends who I've worked with for years on rowing. I ride 'em pretty hard to the point that sometimes my wife thinks I'm an asshole. But as a result their skills have improved and they have become decent rowers.

What melts me off is when they lose focus. You end up over-correcting....too close, too far, too close, etc. Or the line of the boat is not the right distance from the bank which changes depending on speed of the current. I can absolutely tell if the distance is correct just by watching my fisher. They don't have to say anything. Also, if the oars are out of the water and the boat is picking up momentum I will absolutely say something.

When I row, the oars are very seldom out of the water. Even if I'm not pulling, I'm always making small corrections. The crab stroke is absolutely necessary. If you don't know this move learn it. It is impossible to be a strong rower for a fisher without it.

I take great pride in my rowing. I want the fishers to have the best and most comfortable experience. There are a lot of times that I can keep the fisher on a drift w/o ever having to recast. Remember, we aren't there to catch owls. Keep that fly in the water.

I expect my partners to have the same commitment. There are few things more annoying than having to constantly provide feedback to the rower. I just want to fish.

With that said, there are exceptions. My wife is learning how to row and I'm more forgiving and patient. But besides her, I'm not really interested in teaching new folks. It takes a lot of time and energy. You want to learn how to row? Do what I did and go buy a boat, learn, then get back to me.

See, I turn into a Karen


Not only does it stress me out and it can be extremely dangerous.

I don’t like fishing from boats. (Though i like float tubes.) In part because i feel trapped, but also i don’t always feel safe, but i would get in your boat @Swimmy!
 

Swimmy

I have an amazing collection of fishing shirts
WFF Supporter
Making rapid adjustments on the move is key to maximum presentation in this style of fishing.
Understatement right there. Especially on that river where distance is constantly changing and the banks come at you fast.

I don’t like fishing from boats. (Though i like float tubes.) In part because i feel trapped, but also i don’t always feel safe, but i would get in your boat @Swimmy!
You are welcome anytime. We can always provide extra measures for your comfort and safety.

 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I don’t like fishing from boats. (Though i like float tubes.) In part because i feel trapped, but also i don’t always feel safe, but i would get in your boat @Swimmy!
i don't either, seems like a side scrolling video game to me BUT some people really like it and I have no doubt Swimmy is probably very good at it.
 

Swimmy

I have an amazing collection of fishing shirts
WFF Supporter
Oh and I love wade fishing as well. I'm probably 60-40 float to wade.

There are just certain games we play that are more fun from a boat. Salmo just got to experience one of 'em a couple of weeks ago.
 

Jonathan Tachell

Active Member
Yeah. No.

It is more than that. I have friends who I've worked with for years on rowing. I ride 'em pretty hard to the point that sometimes my wife thinks I'm an asshole. But as a result their skills have improved and they have become decent rowers.

What melts me off is when they lose focus. You end up over-correcting....too close, too far, too close, etc. Or the line of the boat is not the right distance from the bank which changes depending on speed of the current. I can absolutely tell if the distance is correct just by watching my fisher. They don't have to say anything. Also, if the oars are out of the water and the boat is picking up momentum I will absolutely say something.

When I row, the oars are very seldom out of the water. Even if I'm not pulling, I'm always making small corrections. The crab stroke is absolutely necessary. If you don't know this move learn it. It is impossible to be a strong rower for a fisher without it.

I take great pride in my rowing. I want the fishers to have the best and most comfortable experience. There are a lot of times that I can keep the fisher on a drift w/o ever having to recast. Remember, we aren't there to catch owls. Keep that fly in the water.

I expect my partners to have the same commitment. There are few things more annoying than having to constantly provide feedback to the rower. I just want to fish.

With that said, there are exceptions. My wife is learning how to row and I'm more forgiving and patient. But besides her, I'm not really interested in teaching new folks. It takes a lot of time and energy. You want to learn how to row? Do what I did and go buy a boat, learn, then get back to me.

See, I turn into a Karen


Not only does it stress me out and it can be extremely dangerous.

What is the crab stroke? is that the same thing as sculling?
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
Yeah. No.

It is more than that. I have friends who I've worked with for years on rowing. I ride 'em pretty hard to the point that sometimes my wife thinks I'm an asshole. But as a result their skills have improved and they have become decent rowers.

What melts me off is when they lose focus. You end up over-correcting....too close, too far, too close, etc. Or the line of the boat is not the right distance from the bank which changes depending on speed of the current. I can absolutely tell if the distance is correct just by watching my fisher. They don't have to say anything. Also, if the oars are out of the water and the boat is picking up momentum I will absolutely say something.

When I row, the oars are very seldom out of the water. Even if I'm not pulling, I'm always making small corrections. The crab stroke is absolutely necessary. If you don't know this move learn it. It is impossible to be a strong rower for a fisher without it.

I take great pride in my rowing. I want the fishers to have the best and most comfortable experience. There are a lot of times that I can keep the fisher on a drift w/o ever having to recast. Remember, we aren't there to catch owls. Keep that fly in the water.

I expect my partners to have the same commitment. There are few things more annoying than having to constantly provide feedback to the rower. I just want to fish.

With that said, there are exceptions. My wife is learning how to row and I'm more forgiving and patient. But besides her, I'm not really interested in teaching new folks. It takes a lot of time and energy. You want to learn how to row? Do what I did and go buy a boat, learn, then get back to me.

See, I turn into a Karen


Not only does it stress me out and it can be extremely dangerous.

Years of pulling plugs for steelhead will teach you how to row
 

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