What's Your Preference for Wading Boots

I put rock treads on an older pair of Patagonia boots this year. So far, so good. I don’t know if I’d hike super far on them, but they do grip better than my old felt sole boots.
. 97DB8C79-3B83-47DF-B598-850E43BBEACE.jpeg
 

Dave Maddock

Active Member
On your Korkers, have you encountered any issues with the felt soles coming off..? I'm thinking that they maybe prone to falling off and getting lost or are they on there pretty secure..? I was just looking at the Hodgmans website and I see that they're going the same route with the interchangeable soles..
I've had a pair of their lower end boots going on 4 years and they've been solid. Had to get new felts for them because of wear.
No problems with them staying on the boot.
Only issue is one of the D ring to hook the gaiters or cuffs on rusted off .
I use their rubber soles in the salt.
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
I've owned the boots below.

Simms Freestone rubber sole
Simms Headwaters rubber sole
Redington Skagit River rubber sole
Redington Forge felt sole

I've also used the boots below, on guided trips.

Simms Headwaters Boa felt sole
Redington Prowler rubber sole

I found the Redington rubber soles to be much better than the Simms rubber soles. I also didn't like the Simms Boa lacing system, despite being a huge fan of Boa laces on my snowboarding boots. I would buy Simms boots with felt soles and normal laces, but Redington are always better value and have held up just as well for me. I'll only use rubber boots if I have to; felt is so much better.
 

cdnred

Active Member
I was reading reviews on the Orvis Pro wading boots. A lot of people were complaining about sole separation and taking a long time to dry. Wearing wet boots in the water is obvious but I'm thinking if you're hiking in with those boots, you'll be hiking out in wet boots. My other concern is with damaging your feet from hiking in wet boots. Anyone ever encountered foot issues from hiking in wet boots..?
 

Greg Price

Love da little fishies
I've had 3 pairs of Korkers since 2010 and have never had the soles come off. Perhaps I haven't experienced the same boot sucking mud a few others have?
They've all provided me with excellent ankle support.
My Korkers Devil's Canyon boots that I used for 5 years and new Terror Ridge boots are 1 oz heaver than my old Weinbrenner Borger boots, and weigh the same as my Chota STL boots. They are 4 ounces lighter than my old-school full-grain leather - Norwegian welt hiking/climbing boots but have at least as much foot support and are slightly higher with better ankle support. Better than the Chota boots for both.
The new high end Terror Ridge lace-up boots also do a very good job of locking the foot into the heel cup; better than the Devil's Canyon with Boa laces.
I also have to comment that when I have had problems Korkers Customer Service has been outstanding with my boots both in and out of warranty.
going on year 5 with korkers Devils Canyon.

They show wear, but no seam failure like i experienced with cheaper boots. I am hard on boots, i wet wade the S Fork Snoqualmie and other similar streams - my fav kind of fly fishing.

Korkers warranty has been excellent.

BOA is even better. 2 years ago BOA sent me new laces, knobs and ratchet mechanism for FREE. But i could not get the knob bolt to loosen. I was a bit panicky cause i had a vacation planned in 4 days.

BOA overnighted my boots to the factory, replaced the knob, ratcheting mechanism and laces. I had the boots back within a few days and it was all FREE under warranty, plus they sent extra parts. Unbelievable with old boots, they were 3 years old at that time.

So i have another vacation planned later this week. I thought it would be good to check my equipment for wear. The other boot needed new laces as they were frayed almost to the point of breaking in a few places. Not bad for boots that have been abused for 5 seasons.

Once again i could not budge the small bolt holding the Knob on, even after applying wd40.

So I cut a pie shaped wedge out of the plastic knob. This allowed me access to the 2 bolts holding the ratcheting mechanism to the boot. It worked! Only one pie shaped cut was needed as i could turn knob to reach other bolt.

i Love the Korkers. They have held up great. Are light weight yet offer ankle support, and the changable system is easy to replace. The second gen is much better than the first gen i owned 15 years ago.

I use different soles for diff purposes.

Vibram rubber sole - Winter salt water due to walking in and not much moss in cold winter water. Also when in drift boat,

Felt Sole - Early Summer wet wading streams. Winter steelhead fishing.

Felt with cleats - Later summer when i encounter mossy slickness on rocks. Great for that, but not good earlier in season when not as much slick goop on rocks. Cleats way to slick on clean rock. Cleats also excellent when scampering over downed timber or crossing slick wood bridges
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Anyone ever encountered foot issues from hiking in wet boots..?
I do a few 1.5-3 mile hike-ins to wet wade some pretty water. I have taken second pairs of wool and neoprene socks to change into for the hike out but not always and can't recall any hotspots or blisters either way. YMMV. The Korkers boots I've had drain very well and the dry socks didn't feel like they were any wetter after the hike out than they would be from perspiration.
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
I was reading reviews on the Orvis Pro wading boots. A lot of people were complaining about sole separation and taking a long time to dry. Wearing wet boots in the water is obvious but I'm thinking if you're hiking in with those boots, you'll be hiking out in wet boots. My other concern is with damaging your feet from hiking in wet boots. Anyone ever encountered foot issues from hiking in wet boots..?

I've never had an issue hiking wet, but I also wear merino hiking socks (the thick ones) under the neoprene wet wading sock.

While I personally haven't had any issues with mine (I've put a bunch of miles on mine), one of my good fishing buddies did have his separate. No issue returning, but that's definitely not something you want to have happen on the water as it could become dangerous depending on how aggressive of a wader you are.

As far as drying time, Every wading boot I've owned has been about the same in that regard. These are no exception.
 

PooterTooter

Active Member
I've had 3 pairs of Korkers since 2010 and have never had the soles come off. Perhaps I haven't experienced the same boot sucking mud a few others have?
They've all provided me with excellent ankle support.
My Korkers Devil's Canyon boots that I used for 5 years and new Terror Ridge boots are 1 oz heaver than my old Weinbrenner Borger boots, and weigh the same as my Chota STL boots. They are 4 ounces lighter than my old-school full-grain leather - Norwegian welt hiking/climbing boots but have at least as much foot support and are slightly higher with better ankle support. Better than the Chota boots for both.
The new high end Terror Ridge lace-up boots also do a very good job of locking the foot into the heel cup; better than the Devil's Canyon with Boa laces.
I also have to comment that when I have had problems Korkers Customer Service has been outstanding with my boots both in and out of warranty.

I can echo this. My soles have never come off of my Korkers. Mine are 2 years old and showing their age quicker than I'd like, but no other complaints.
 

c.burke

Member
I have Simms with boas and Simms with laces (as back-up). I love them both, particularly the boas. If you get boas, make sure you buy one or two replacement kits to take with you.
Replacement Boa lacing available free from Boa. boafit.com
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Interesting thread, lots of "this is the best", "no this is the best" :p. It does seem that a pair wading boots is like a boat; one boat isn't enough.

I wet wade Banks Lake and portions of the Columbia this time of year. I've tried a half dozen different types of wet wading wear: Tevas, worn out running shoes, generic (cheap) slip on rubber boat shoes and more recently a pair of Weinbrenner studded felts. The first trip with the Weinbrenner boots I wore a pair of ankle height socks, neoprene wading sock inside the boots. They were too loose, couldn't get them tight enough (AA width feet: really fun finding shoes to fit). Yesterday I bulked up heavier socks inside the neoprene socks and cinched up the laces. For wading the lake shoreline where one minute you're in mud, next flat and not quite snot slick basalt and the next a boulder field, these boots work really well. The downside is the studs; they're noisy and I think can at times spook my prey.

I cover several miles when I'm out and about stalking fish, the wet hasn't ever bothered me. I suppose if I was hiking in 1.5 - 3 miles (jeez) I might carry the wading boots in a backpack and wear more appropriate hiking shoes.
 

cdnred

Active Member
The downside is the studs; they're noisy and I think can at times spook my prey.

I cover several miles when I'm out and about stalking fish, the wet hasn't ever bothered me. I suppose if I was hiking in 1.5 - 3 miles (jeez) I might carry the wading boots in a backpack and wear more appropriate hiking shoes.
That was my thinking as well about studs scaring off fish. If fish get spooked by shadows, I'm sure that'll be the same with noise..
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top