Looking for beach rookie advice

BigBigTrip

WFF Supporter
Yep, what they said.

I would also recommend a lot of research:
- Reading a couple books on the subject can dramatically assist your learning curve and there are several really good ones out there.
- An hour or two with the beverage of your choice, GoogleMaps, and this forum's search function can be enlightening.

Also, once things get back to normal, a beach class (or seminar) offered by a local fly shop (or national chain of fly shops) can be just as valuable as a guided trip towards exponentially increasing your level of knowledge and/or ability.

All that being said, there's nothing like time on the beach to help put the pieces together. Don't get discouraged, dry spells are part of the beach game because sometimes the fish aren't there. It's all part of the learning curve. Good luck!
 
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NRC

WFF Supporter
I dont think this has been thrown out there yet. I dont tend to stay at any beach too long. If I have not felt a grab or a pluck or seen a jump or nervous water I dont hesitate to try a different beach.
Agreed when it comes to cutthroat fishing or winter rezzie fishing. If I'm fishing for coho in the summer/fall, though, personally I tend to stick it out a lot longer at any individual beach. You never know when the fish are gonna cruise by, and you definitely won't catch them from your car on the way to the next beach. That said I will still change the channel on a coho beach if too much wind kicks up from the wrong direction and/or I know the tides will be setting up better on a different beach nearby.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Agreed when it comes to cutthroat fishing or winter rezzie fishing. If I'm fishing for coho in the summer/fall, though, personally I tend to stick it out a lot longer at any individual beach. You never know when the fish are gonna cruise by, and you definitely won't catch them from your car on the way to the next beach. That said I will still change the channel on a coho beach if too much wind kicks up from the wrong direction and/or I know the tides will be setting up better on a different beach nearby.

It always a tough call whether to relocate.
I also tend to stick it out if I think there are fish around. I tend to relocate more based on tides and water movement.
One beach might fish better on an outgoing so I’ll fish that towards the end of the tide then relocate to a beach that fishes better on the incoming.

Sometime perseverance pays off.
I fished a beach with a few other members a few years back. Four hours and nothing. The tide slowed a bit and everything aligned, resulting in five nice coho to hand between us in a half hour.
SF
 

Camo Clad Warrior

Active Member
My tip would be to simply have fun. Not sure if any of these dudes touched on this yet. I will be hitting the beaches for coho the first time in a couple weeks and am excited.
 

Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
Tied up some thunder creek style clouser minnows. Salmon hooks. Should work right? If not it's a good bass fly pattern....

My son also wants to catch a bass this summer. We hit lake Sammamish yesterday ....he got skunked ( not good) and I fought a good strong smallie to the boat then lost it ( doh) . Landed a perch, a very small largemouth and a sunfish. We will hit the water again tomorrow.
 

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Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
Is there a reg in saltwater to clip the barb? Of course if going for SRC its a catch and release fishery so single barbless, but salmon? Relase wild salmon right? Clipped adipose fin and you have something for the barbecue...

Chratreuse and pink are next up...I'm inclined to pick good beach spot and stay there. Me thinks too much moving to greener grass cuts down on flies in the water. In rivers, I'm known for the "run and gun" approach looking for eager fish. It works for me, but I don't like driving or hiking from spot to spot...
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Is there a reg in saltwater to clip the barb? Of course if going for SRC its a catch and release fishery so single barbless, but salmon? Relase wild salmon right? Clipped adipose fin and you have something for the barbecue...

Chratreuse and pink are next up...I'm inclined to pick good beach spot and stay there. Me thinks too much moving to greener grass cuts down on flies in the water. In rivers, I'm known for the "run and gun" approach looking for eager fish. It works for me, but I don't like driving or hiking from spot to spot...

Depends on the area if you can keep wild coho or not, so check the regs.
There is also no salmon fishing in MA 8-1 or 8-2 this summer, so something to keep in mind when you select beaches for coho fishing.

Those flies will work for sure.
Just a suggestion, but consider getting some straight eye stainless or duratin coated saltwater hooks for longer fly life.
The dings from the beach in the coating of non salt hooks can lead to rust but a good rinse after fishing can help prevent some of that.

Good luck out there and post a picture of a coho you release onto the bbq this summer. ;)
SF
 

NRC

WFF Supporter
Is there a reg in saltwater to clip the barb? Of course if going for SRC its a catch and release fishery so single barbless, but salmon? Relase wild salmon right? Clipped adipose fin and you have something for the barbecue...

Chratreuse and pink are next up...I'm inclined to pick good beach spot and stay there. Me thinks too much moving to greener grass cuts down on flies in the water. In rivers, I'm known for the "run and gun" approach looking for eager fish. It works for me, but I don't like driving or hiking from spot to spot...
Yup, barbless in saltwater for salmon as well as SRC. Just got checked by a WDFW boat last weekend fishing for kings in Area 7.
 

Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
Since inheriting my Dad's hook collection, I have not bought any hooks. He had maybe 10,000 atlantic salmon hooks that I'm burning through. I care nothing for fly life... if it catches one fish I'm happy!

I'll try to remember spray down the fly box with the reel, rod and wading boots.
 

Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
NRC:
OK thanks for the head's up. I like to smash the barbs as I tie on the fly as needed. If I know beforehand then it makes sense to smash em down prior...
 
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Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Since inheriting my Dad's hook collection, I have not bought any hooks. He had maybe 10,000 atlantic salmon hooks that I'm burning through. I care nothing for fly life... if it catches one fish I'm happy!

I'll try to remember spray down the fly box with the reel, rod and wading boots.

Good deal.
The beaches are hell on flies.
There are some good ideas out there about increasing the durability of beach flies if you ever have interest.
Good luck out there.
SF
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
All really good advice. The only thing I can add is to prepare for some runs that feel like your rod is going to be ripped out of your hands because there is a lot of open water for the fish to run to. It's not like a river where the fish are confined to banks. It also depends on how tight you keep you drag. I've had coho take me to and into my backing only to find that they are two to three pound fish.

If I had a whip to urge fish into longer runs I would. As a steelhead and salmon guy I've seen backing far too few times for one lifetime.
 

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