Looking for beach rookie advice

Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
I need to remember to check our hooks after fishing for a while. Too many times I've found a hook broken at the bend from hitting the rocks on the back cast.

I'm good with long runs into the backing ( clark fork rainbows, big carp), but the kid has never tangled with a big fish on the flyrod...That's what we are looking for!
 

jasmillo

WFF Supporter
I need to remember to check our hooks after fishing for a while. Too many times I've found a hook broken at the bend from hitting the rocks on the back cast.

I'm good with long runs into the backing ( clark fork rainbows, big carp), but the kid has never tangled with a big fish on the flyrod...That's what we are looking for!

I would not get too excited about seeing your backing. It has only happened to me once in the last 3 years and that was a 7-9 lb fish that ate as soon as the fly hit the water so most of my line was out....and it only got a few feet in. So far this year, I have landed 9 or 10 coho between 2 and 4 lbs and I think only one even made it to the reel and that probably was not necessary. BTW, that was a rookie mistake I was making....trying to get every fish on the reel immediately.

Don’t get me wrong, coho make some fast, exciting runs but they tend to be fairly short in my experience, especially if you are set up correctly. I use a 6 or 7 weight and 15 lb flouro as a leader which allows me to fight them aggressively. That is helpful, especially when fishing crowded beaches.

I have also lucked into a few Kings the last couple years which also did not hit the backing. Big chum have gotten me there once or twice though.
 

Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
Any run from any salmon over 20 inches would be welcome. In the snohomish system, pinks sometimes take me into the backing and those are the "wimpy" salmon. My son foul hooked a couple pinks last year and I think that's what got him excited to "really catch" a bright salmon.

I get your point about 15 flouro, we will definitely do that so we can dial down the drag and put the hurt on the fish.
 

DimeBrite

5X Celebrity Jeopardy Champion
Saltwater coho are the ultimate escape artists and shake themselves off the hook pretty easily. Large gap dedicated saltwater hooks (like TMC 811S) are the way to go. Beware of hooks with longshanks for your saltwater coho fishing, toss them out of your box.

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SinglehandJay

Misanthropist
Go to the beaches you plan on finishing when it's a minus tide at low tide and see what the structure is and the shape of the bank you will be fishing. Look for the sharp drops, rocks, boulders, steep banks, rocky, clam beds, steamer beds. More or less anything other than sand unless you know migrating fish are coming through a specific area. Read the water just like a river. Fish seams and rips, nervous water is incredibly productive. Buy and use a stripping basket, it is incredibly important for wade fishing.
 

SinglehandJay

Misanthropist
Long time fly fisher, fresh water. I need salt water advice, like "the Idiots guide to catching salt water salmon near Edmonds"
Never had any luck fly fishing the salt. My 16yo son wants to catch a salmon and I think it would be great if we could do it off the beach in MA10 or MA9. We have 5-6-7-8-10 weight rods to choose from. We have boxes full of clouser minnows, muddlers, buggers and streamers. I've even got foam poppers for us to go Leland Miyawaki style...

I've caught blackmouth off Point No Point mooching as a kid with my grandpa. Tried picnic point a few times for SRC, no luck whatsoever. I catch my SRC in the rivers in September/October. We fish the snohomish river for pinks and silvers with some very spotty luck. In the sound it's just flat, featureless, and feels a bit hopeless...

We need a general beach recommendation ( Picnic point? Carkeek/, Edmonds? Mukilteo?) , a time of day/tide, a favorite pattern, a typical cast/retrieve pattern. Do we need 2 hours on the water or 200 hours on the water? Should we wait until coho and pinks start showing up?

Can any salty fly flickers give us a helpful clue?
You guys should go practice and learn together, you guys get to fish and you get to be there spending time with your kid regardless of catching or not. You can catch fish in the PS 365 days a year, no need to wait for anything or a season. Fishing season never ends
 

Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
Well with beginners and kids you need a high target environment with aggressive fish everywhere you look. That keeps them interested. Hours of fruitless casting?... not so much. We have done stocker trout for years trolling our local lake. Got that one figured out.

We did well in the cascades fishing a creek for small westslope cutts. The kid did it all himself: tying knots, casting without (hooking trees), drag free drift to likely spots, setting the hook, playing the fish and releasing it. Small fish, but good practice. Its also what I know, so I can teach. In Puget sound I know next to nothing...except mooching off Point No Point for blackmouth.
 

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herkileez

WFF Supporter
As mentioned many times above, fish the current like a river. Don't cast directly onto schooling fish. Cast in front, then swing/drift into them whenever you can. Coho are notoriously spooky, so also avoid touching the water with your false casts ...also, don't tap-dance around on the gravel...they notice everything, and become aware of you pretty quickly. You get what I mean: be stealthy, plan it out, and you will be rewarded.
 

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Brad Niemeyer

Old School Member
As mentioned many times above, fish the current like a river. Don't cast directly onto schooling fish. Cast in front, then swing/drift into them whenever you can. Coho are notoriously spooky, so also avoid touching the water with your false casts ...also, don't tap-dance around on the gravel...they notice everything, and become aware of you pretty quickly. You get what I mean: be stealthy, plan it out, and you will be rewarded.
Looks like a switch rod? What does "current" look like in the sound? only water I've seen that was moving was West Seattle off the point at Lincoln park.

It's fairly featureless out there, well it appears featureless I guess there are some underwater hills and valleys
 

Philonius

WFF Supporter
Lincoln Park; not the most productive beach, though I did catch my first resident Coho there years ago. Yes, the current moves past that point fairly quickly at times. Bottom drops off relatively steeply to the N and W, probably shelves off a bit more to the W.
On an outgoing tide, water forms a rip off to the NW, swing that current and working into the soft water behind it. Incoming, just the opposite. Structure- how about those big outfall tanks? They create eddy currents and seams between moving water (especially on an ebb) where fish are likely to hang out. There is a reason that the prime spots there tend to be just either side of the tanks.
In general, structure does tend to be more subtle in the saltwater. Looking at satellite views can help, observing bottom structure at low tide is highly valuable. Very small creeks can create a significant runoff channel at low tide that fish just Love to hang out in when there is a good tidal shift.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
Looks like a switch rod? What does "current" look like in the sound? only water I've seen that was moving was West Seattle off the point at Lincoln park.

It's fairly featureless out there, well it appears featureless I guess there are some underwater hills and valleys
Try Southern Area #13 and you'll see some current, many times too damn much..
 

herkileez

WFF Supporter
Looks like a switch rod? What does "current" look like in the sound? only water I've seen that was moving was West Seattle off the point at Lincoln park.

It's fairly featureless out there, well it appears featureless I guess there are some underwater hills and valleys
Doesn't need to be a switch rod. I alternate between switch and sh rods. By current, I mean the running tide....either rt to left or left to rt.
 

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