Question about long rods and netting fish

MGTom

WFF Supporter
I enjoy this euro nymphing and can see the benefits of a longer rod. I'm looking at the 10.5' 4wt from cortland as all my 4wt stuff is from them and I really like it. I can control a fly, but when it comes time to land a fish I feel like an utter spaz. I've watched videos and read a bunch of stuff but in practice I'm just am not that good at it. Cost my son a wild steelhead pic one year because it got in the anchor rope instead of the net. Part of it is because I fish downstream, and I don't haul a fish into the current but work over/below it to net it, but still the final guiding into the net is difficult, even when I pay attention to where I am on the leader.. Today I lost 2 of the 5 good fish, but that's OK, I got to fight them close. Anyway, I had my 8.5 foot rod, which is harder to use while netting than the 7 footer. I'm wondering if you folks who use the longer rods, even spey guys, find the long rods harder to use while netting fish while wading and any tips that might help.
 

MGTom

WFF Supporter
I play the fish. Then when ready I move the rod over my shoulder and grab the leader and tail them. Light drag helps
I guess that brings up another question. I don't come across many big fish down here but lots of energetic "flippy" ones 6-13". I net them cause often they just rub the barbless hook out. I hate to fight to hold them very tight to remove a hook so I haven't been grabbing the leader and landing by hand except when it just seems to work out. Wondering what is best for the fish?
 

Shad

Active Member
If you're fishing barbless, just letting the line go slack once you're satisfied you can chalk up the "catch" lets 'em shake right off. If not, well, we do the dance.
 

long_rod_silvers

Active Member
Love long rods :)
I use measure nets, which are extendable - never had an issue landing fish because of the length of the rod. Personally, I prefer the longer rods because you're less likely to need to pull the leader/line connection in and avoid hangups if the fish decides to run.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Any time you bring your rod past 45 degrees, in any direction, you begin compressing the load to the upper rod sections, the weakest sections, and are at risk of breaking your rod. If you rod is bent in a inverted j shape, you're doing it wrong.
I'll add this disclaimer.. i often do the same thing even though I know I shouldn't.
 

Porter

Well-Known Member
With your left hand grab the line and continue to maintain line tension with the fish. Now assume the crouching tiger position (squat) and with plenty of slack line use your right hand to point the rod straight up and bring back over your head and rotate downward so it gently rests on your hind shoulders and be prepared to slide it back and forth to find proper balance. When rod and reel is stable on your well toned traps, again using your right hand secure the net in which you wish to land the fish. Place the net in front of you and net opening out and secure it with your bent knees. Now with both hands gently pull in your hidden dragon whopper of a fish, tease it gently in to the net opening. With fish happily squiggling and struggling in the net, your hands now free at your own discretion which hand to use for what.... reach in to your water tight bag (I like to use my left), gently undo it and pull out both your pro selfie stick and your smart phone. Turn on your phone and properly set it to the settings your prefer, possibly portrait? If you need to use both hands to manipulate your phone then easily place the selfie stick in your mouth until phone is ready for placement. Secure the phone on the stick and patiently extend the stick, no droppies. Find the angle that demonstrates the size and beauty of your fish, the brand of your rod and reel, make sure the hat is on correct, take time to decide if you should keep the shades on or is it better without the shades, or take multi pictures and fer gawds sake grin regardless how much your knees are screaming in pain and all the hassle you just went through.

I saw something of this nature a while back on the Yakima ....just:eek:
 
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MGTom

WFF Supporter
With your left hand grab the line and continue to maintain line tension with the fish. Now assume the crouching tiger position (squat) and with plenty of slack line use your right hand to point the rod straight up and bring back over your head and rotate downward so it gently rests on your hind shoulders and be prepared to slide it back and forth to find proper balance. When rod and reel is stable on your well toned traps, again using your right hand secure the net in which you wish to land the fish. Place the net in front of you and net opening out and secure it with your bent knees. Now with both hands gently pull in your hidden dragon whopper of a fish, tease it gently in to the net opening. With fish happily squiggling and struggling in the net, your hands now free at your own discretion which hand to use for what.... reach in to your water tight bag (I like to use my left), gently undo it and pull out both your pro selfie stick and your smart phone. Turn on your phone and properly set it to the settings your prefer, possibly portrait? If you need to use both hands to manipulate your phone then easily place the selfie stick in your mouth until phone is ready for placement. Secure the phone on the stick and patiently extend the stick, no droppies. Find the angle that demonstrates the size and beauty of your fish, the brand of your rod and reel, make sure the hat is on correct, take time to decide if you should keep the shades on or is it better without the shades, or take multi pictures and fer gawds sake grin regardless how much your knees are screaming in pain and all the hassle you just went through.

I saw something of this nature a while back on the Yakima ....just:eek:
Thx for the rod control part. I've watched it on video, now to practice. I was resting the rod near the net handle in the net basket, but with 2-3 fly rigs it gets messy. The phone part I got, about 5 seconds, set it before, and put in fly box pocket. two pushes of on, click, and back in pocket. And its a samsung s8 active, so if it goes in the net or river I deal with the fish, then the phone. Amazingly durable. I find my log book entries are shorter with a few pics of the stream, bugs, the setup, and a few of the fish with fly (not all at once:)) in a folder.
 

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