Damsel presentations

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
I saw a red Damselfly one time. It was on the N/F Stilly in the winter time while fly fishing for Winter runs. But the sun was shining and it was fairly warm out yet. Weird to say the least.
 

jwg

Active Member
I have been back to that lake a couple of times.

Fishing has still been slow each time.
But @Wayne Kohan had something dialed in last weekend under an indicator. he showed me a stomach sample as well, tiny dark things.
Yesterday, I had some indicator take downs on tiny dark things I tied up, always brook trout when I hooked up on those.
(dark grey thread, tie on and then wrap shiny black material back up to the front, tie on one strand of some off white material as the wing, wrap the black shiny material over the now thickened thorax, and tie it all off, straight size 16 hook)

Happily, I also had some takes with a green damsel pattern at the surface, casting into the edges of the weeds. Including an 18 inch rainbow that promptly and strongly headed for the middle of the lake.

the green damsel pattern was not perfect. Although I also caught a nice brook trout with it, there was a look and ignore from another large rainbow.
(green/tan braid with black marks, green yarn for the thorax, a couple of strands of crystal flash for the wing, guinea soft hackle tied parachute around the yarn before pulling the yarn forward, I think that was it. Similar to the Borger pattern that @silvercreek posted here. I'll try a stiff hackle next time.)

I think this is the first time I have caught fish with damsel patterns in or near the reeds, so I must be learning something.

thanks for the help from everyone on this thread.
j
 

Joel K

New Member
Help!

curious more about presentations than the flies themselves, although happy to hear about your best patterns.

I know there was a recent thread on Green Damsels and plan to try the heather nymph that @MGTom posted.

but really, I am most mystified about a near total lack of interest in a commercial blue damsel pattern I tried, when there were vast numbers of damsels over the lake and splashy rises mid lake as well as near reeds. The pattern had a blue foam body and a parachute type hackle.

I did notice that mating damsel pairs were most likely to drop to the lake surface out of the air, (talking mid lake here, not reeds) and other times the wind blew single flies down onto the water. Lots flew back off.

I also remember seeing a post here were someone experimented with how much of a dismembered damsel fly it took to get rise, and it only took throwing a piece of blue body for a trout to come up and take it. I have always thought I might try just blue foam body with black hackle, given this persons observation.

You can guess the lake.

Hope to try this lake again soon.

When I was there last weekend, @Steve Kokita and @Lue Taylor were not there to watch and imitate.

Jay
Jay,
I've fished many lakes in the PNW over my 76 years and have never seen a fish take an adult damsel fly. Nymphs yes but adults no. That's been my experience anyway.

Good Luck!
Joel
 

jwg

Active Member
Fly on top caught brook and rainbow

On reflection some rainbows were coming out of the water and bumping the reed, so I’ll try a sparser version next time .. fly on bottom.. to be more immature.

J.



7A0B6DBA-1922-4EE0-94F4-309A853DF5F9.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Buzzy

Active Member
I’ve only been fishing in the PNW for 45 years, and in that time I e seen hundreds if not thousands of adult damsels eaten by trout.
I vividly remember the first time I saw a trout eating adult damselflies. I was float tubing Dry Falls back when the big flat shallow was still watered up (that was such great early season water: the heater). Kicking along I could hear something behind me, spun around and saw a trout rising to a ball of a few dozen adult damselflies that were mating (or trying to) right next to a small clump of tules. I watched for several minutes and at one point the trout jumped trying to catch a fly in the air (at least that what I thought it was doing).

I ended up catching that trout on the only adult damselfly pattern I had. Since that day I've seen trout eat adult damselflies at Chopaka, Lenore and Rocky Ford. At Chopaka an adult damselfly pattern really did save the day.
 

Irafly

Indi Ira
WFF Supporter
I vividly remember the first time I saw a trout eating adult damselflies. I was float tubing Dry Falls back when the big flat shallow was still watered up (that was such great early season water: the heater). Kicking along I could hear something behind me, spun around and saw a trout rising to a ball of a few dozen adult damselflies that were mating (or trying to) right next to a small clump of tules. I watched for several minutes and at one point the trout jumped trying to catch a fly in the air (at least that what I thought it was doing).

I ended up catching that trout on the only adult damselfly pattern I had. Since that day I've seen trout eat adult damselflies at Chopaka, Lenore and Rocky Ford. At Chopaka an adult damselfly pattern really did save the day.


One of my first trips to Chopaka was also saved by adult damsel patterns. Thousands of calibaetis on the water, and only the occasional damsel, but the trout were ignoring the mays and hitting every adult damsel that hit the water. Fun day until I lost the only patterns I had.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
One of my first trips to Chopaka was also saved by adult damsel patterns. Thousands of calibaetis on the water, and only the occasional damsel, but the trout were ignoring the mays and hitting every adult damsel that hit the water. Fun day until I lost the only patterns I had.
Darc and I were camped at Chopaka and except for a monumental caddis hatch that lasted maybe an hour, we struggled to catch fish. Kicking along the tules and seeing the splashes between shore and water clear of tules was a hint. It didn't take long for us to break off the one or two adult patterns we had. When nothing else seemed to work we sat at the table and tied flies using blue bucktail. We'd carefully wrap and counter wrap thread up and down the length of the bucktail to give it the damselfly appearance and keep the bucktail from flaring, then add head cement. I bet it took an hour to tie one fly and then first cast: fish on, fly gone.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top