Yellow Squash

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Slice into 1/4” thick rounds.
Put on parchment paper.
Season with salt and pepper. I like to use garlic pepper. Add a spoon of Parmesan cheese on top.
Back at 425° for 15-20 minutes.
I do the same thing with zucchini.
For a twist, spread a dollop of ranch or thousand island dressing on each round before adding the Parmesan.

My girlfriend makes a good summer squash casserole. I’ll see if I can get that recipe for you.
SF
 
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Old406Kid

Active Member
Winged it tonight.
Squash, Zucchini, Red Onion, Sweet and Spicy sausage, Olive oil, Balsamic, Garlic Pepper, salt, Mrs. Dash's, minced garlic, and Parmesan cheese.
I did it covered on the BBQ At 350 for 30 minutes.

Pre Sausage
IMG-4141.JPG


Post sausage and additional cheese.
IMG-4142.JPG
 

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Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
That looks very good, Dean. If I ever get back to shopping for myself, I'll try that one. Thanks!
 

Robert Engleheart

Robert
WFF Supporter
Any roasted veggies are great, even Brussel Sprouts and Caulflower, which I hate steamed, but coat them with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic (I prefer roasted to salt) and a dash of red pepper flakes and they take on a whole different flavor. Cut the sprouts in 1/2, cauliflower into florets.
looks good, Dean; I like the addition of the sausage.
 
Here are three of my family's favorite ways my mom cooked yellow summer crookneck squash for us growing up.

My mom was a high school teacher for 32 years. In the summer she always had a big garden and, with 10 weeks off from teaching, she cooked lots of dishes from her garden for us four kids. As y'all probably know, five or six yellow squash plants can produce prodigous amounts of crooknecks in the summer. As we kids grew older and began working summer jobs, she increased it to 8 squash plants. It's an inexpensive but very good & healthy food.

1. A simple stovetop side dish:

Cut up 3 yellow crookneck squash into 1/2" rounds. Peel a big Walla Walla sweet onion and cut it into 8 large pieces. Put the squash & onion pieces into a 2-quart pot. Do not add any water. Start it on a stovetop burner on medium-low with the lid on the pot. The onion and squash will release plenty of liquid as they warm up and cook. If you add water, it just dilutes the flavor. I learned this the old fashioned way: ("Mom, why does your stovetop squash dish always have more intense flavor than mine?" "Did you add water to it?" "Yes." "That's why. Don't add any water." "Ahhh! Now I get it. Thanks, Mom!").

After 10-15 minutes, there should be enough liquid released from the 2 vegetables to allow you to turn up the heat to medium. Keep the pot covered. In another 15 minutes when the squash is fork tender, add a pat or two of butter and some ground black pepper. Turn off the heat, cover it till the butter melts, and then give it a 10-second stir. Makes a great side dish. Leftovers are good reheated.

2. Sautéed. Mom would cut the crookneck squash into 1/4" - 3/8" rounds, dip them in cornmeal batter, and sauté it in a skillet. Drain it on paper towels. You can google this one -- there are lots of videos. Pick a batter method you prefer. It's very good.

3. Every summer, Mom tried different yellow crookneck squash casserole recipes out on us. (The one posted up above in a video is one I will try soon -- it looks good.)

This is the one for yellow crookneck summer squash that became our family favorite:

Southern-Style Yellow Crookneck Squash Casserole, adapted for the PacNWest

5 or 6 yellow crookneck squash, cut into 1/2" rounds
1 large yellow or sweet onion, cut into 1/4" dice
1 egg, beaten with a fork
One 8 oz. Box of Jiffy cornbread mix
1 regular size can of creamed corn
1/2 cup of Picante salsa
One small can of diced green chiles
1 Tablespoon of melted butter
1 cup of grated mild or medium-sharp cheddar cheese (Don't use an uber-expensive cheddar. Use Safeway cheddar.)

Get a good-sized soup pot out. Turn the stovetop heat to medium.

Add 1/2 Tablespoon of olive oil. Saute the chopped onion for 3-4 minutes.

Add the squash to the onions. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally with a wood spoon, uncovered, until the squash is tender but not mushy.

Turn off heat. Gently mash the squash and onion with a potato masher unto a chunky mixture. (Don't over-do it. Sometimes I forego the potato masher and just use a hefty wooden spoon.)

Add remaining ingedients to the pot. Stir with a wooden spoon or a stout rubber spatula till all of it is mixed in together.

Pour the mixture into a lightly buttered or lightly oiled Pyrex or other baking dish. I usually double the recipe and use a 13x9 baking dish and a 2nd smaller baking dish.

Bake at 350 uncovered for 50 minutes. Cut it into into squares and serve as a side dish.

Leftovers can be reheated or frozen and reheated in a microwave or oven.
 
Last edited:

Old406Kid

Active Member
Here are three of my family's favorite ways my mom cooked yellow summer crookneck squash for us growing up.

My mom was a high school teacher for 32 years. In the summer she always had a big garden and, with 10 weeks off from teaching, she cooked lots of dishes from her garden for us four kids. As y'all probably know, five or six yellow squash plants can produce prodigous amounts of crooknecks in the summer. As we kids grew older and began working summer jobs, she increased it to 8 squash plants. It's an inexpensive but very good & healthy food.

1. A simple stovetop side dish:

Cut up 3 yellow crookneck squash into 1/2" rounds. Peel a big Walla Walla sweet onion and cut it into 8 large pieces. Put the squash & onion pieces into a 2-quart pot. Do not add any water. Start it on a stovetop burner on medium-low with the lid on the pot. The onion and squash will release plenty of liquid as they warm up and cook. If you add water, it just dilutes the flavor. I learned this this old fashioned way: ("Mom, why does your stovetop squash dish always more intense flavor than mine?" "Did you add water to it?" "Yes." "That's why. Don't add any water." "Ahhh! Now I get it. Thanks, Mom!").

After 10-15 minutes, there should be enough liquid released from the 2 vegetables to allow you turn up the heat up to medium. Keep the pot covered. In another 15 minutes when the squash is fork tender, add a pat or two of butter and some ground black pepper. Turn off the heat, cover it till the butter melts, and then give it a 10-second stir. Makes a great side dish. Leftovers are good reheated.

2. Sautéed. Mom would cut the crookneck squash into 1/4" - 3/8" rounds, dip them in cornmeal batter, and sauté it in a skillet. Drain it on paper towels. You can google this one -- there are lots of videos. Pick a batter method you prefer. It's very good.

3. Every summer, Mom tried different yellow crookneck squash casserole recipes out on us. This is the one for yellow crookneck summer squash that became the family favorite.

Southern-Style Yellow Crookneck Squash Casserole, adapted for the PacNWest

5 or 6 yellow crookneck squash, cut into 1/2" rounds
1 large yellow or sweet onion, cut into 1/4" dice
1 egg, beaten with a fork
One 8 oz. Box of Jiffy cornbread mix
1 regular size can of creamed corn
1/2 cup of Picante salsa
One small can of diced green chiles
1 Tablespoon of melted butter
1 cup of grated mild or medium-sharp cheddar cheese (Don't use an uber-expensive cheddar. Use Safeway cheddar.)

Get a good-sized soup pot out. Turn the stovetop heat to medium.

Add 1/2 Tablespoon of olive oil. Saute the chopped onion for 3-4 minutes.

Add the squash to the onions. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally with a wood spoon, uncovered, until the squash is tender but not mushy.

Turn off heat. Gently mash the squash and onion with a potato masher unto a chunky mixture. (Don't over-do it. Sometimes I forego the potato masher and just use a hefty wooden spoon.)

Add remaining ingedients to the pot. Stir with a wooden spoon or stout rubber spatula till all of it is mixed in together.

Pour the mixture into a lightly buttered or lightly oiled Pyrex or other baking dish. I usually double the recipe and use a 13x9 baking dish and a 2nd smaller baking dish.

Bake at 350 uncovered for 50 minutes. Cut it into into squares and serve as a side dish.

Leftovers can be reheated or frozen and reheated in a microwave or oven.
Thanks, looks like some good recipes!
I think I'll try one of them tomorrow night.
 

WAS

Active Member
We slice fairly small ones either way and brown them well in olive oil in a frying pan, add little butter at the end and some sea salt.. Also, leave the blossoms on a few and see what you think. We usually fight over those. We don't use big squash except to make spaghetti and will pour a homemade tomato or pesto sauce over it and smother in pecorino cheese.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
We slice fairly small ones either way and brown them well in olive oil in a frying pan, add little butter at the end and some sea salt.. Also, leave the blossoms on a few and see what you think. We usually fight over those. We don't use big squash except to make spaghetti and will pour a homemade tomato or pesto sauce over it and smother in pecorino cheese.
Speaking of blossoms, there are some pretty good recipes out there for stuffed squash blossoms.
I had some a few years ago at a restaurant and they were excellent.
SF
 

WAS

Active Member
I had to include this dish which we just had tonight. It's from our tasting room restaurant and I think it's fabulous. Takes a few items to make up but very tasty. I'll see if I can get the recipe for you.

SZECHUAN EGGPLANT AND SUMMER SQUASH $11.00
Szechuan-garlic sauce, dried chilis, peanuts, green onion, cilantro
 

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