Some Myths about Catch and Release

Nick Clayton

WFF Premium
While we're on the topic, could someone please compile and post a list of which fish are acceptable to remove from the water and photograph and which fish are not?

I find it quite interesting that fly anglers seem to pick and choose which are allowed.

From what I can gather via looking at posts here and on FB groups it's totally fine to remove the following fish and more from the water and take pics:

Small mountain stream trout. It's cool to hold those 5" fish in your hand and take pics of how beautiful their colors and spotting is

Bass. Nobody gives a shit about them.

Trout from lakes. Nobody cares.

Puget Sound sculpin and flounder. Native, but not a typical target species. It's fine to pull indicental bi catch out of the water for pics

Montana trout. I mean you drove all the way there so of course fish pics are acceptable.

Tropical destination fish. Apparently if you fly to Christmas Island it's totally cool to remove those fish from the water and into the hot sun for photo ops. Bones, permit, tarpon, GTs, Triggers etc. Apparently those fish are far too hardy to be impacted. Or is this a case of if you fly out of state to fish that you don't have in your backyard then caring about them isn't required?

Pike. They have big teeth and are mean so maybe they don't matter.

White fish, pike Minnow, suckers etc. Yeah, they are native, but they're ugly and undesired by most anglers so yard them out of the water all you like. Hell, kill em and toss em up on the beach for that matter

Chum salmon. They're ugly, so pulling a fish out of the water doesn't matter.

Coho, chinook and rainbows from Alaskan rivers. Hell they are abundant and out of state, so fish pics don't harm those fish.

Sea run cutts as long as you put them in an aquarium. It's cool to remove them from the water and dump them into an aquarium, because, well water. Duh. If you take a pic during the process though the fish will probably die.

Oregon steelhead. It's legal, so those fish aren't impacted by a quick fish pic. Surprising there are any steelhead left at all down there with all the photos I see.

I could go on and on of course.

But ya, a sea run cutthroat pretty much instantly dies by camera flash and is unacceptable.
 
Last edited:

NRC

WFF Premium
While we're on the topic, could someone please compile and post a list of which fish are acceptable to remove from the water and photograph and which fish are not?

I find it quite interesting that fly anglers seem to pick and choose which are allowed.

From what I can gather via looking at posts here and on FB groups it's totally fine to remove the following fish and more from the water and take pics:

Small mountain stream trout. It's cool to hold those 5" fish in your hand and take pics of how beautiful their colors and spotting is

Bass. Nobody gives a shit about them.

Trout from lakes. Nobody cares.

Montana trout. I mean you drove all the way there so of course fish pics are acceptable.

Tropical destination fish. Apparently if you fly to Christmas Island it's totally cool to remove those fish from the water and into the hot sun for photo ops. Bones, permit, tarpon, GTs, Triggers etc. Apparently those fish are far too hardy to be impacted. Or is this a case of if you fly out of state to fish that you don't have in your backyard then caring about them isn't required?

Pike. They have big teeth and are mean so maybe they don't matter.

White fish, pike Minnow, suckers etc. Yeah, they are native, but they're ugly and undesired by most anglers so yard them out of the water all you like. Hell, kill em and toss em up on the beach for that matter

Chum salmon. They're ugly, so pulling a fish out of the water doesn't matter.

Coho, chinook and rainbows from Alaskan rivers. Hell they are abundant and out of state, so fish pics don't harm those fish.

Sea run cutts as long as you put them in an aquarium. It's cool to remove them from the water and dump them into an aquarium, because, well water. Duh. If you take a pic during the process though the fish will probably die.

Oregon steelhead. It's legal, so those fish aren't impacted by a quick fish pic. Surprising there are any steelhead left at all down there with all the photos I see.

I could go on and on of course.

But ya, a sea run cutthroat pretty much instantly dies by camera flash and is unacceptable.
He’s on a rampage. Somebody stop him!
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Rob, in theory, that's great but when many folks can't be depended on to manage their own behavior, someone has to hold their hand through it.
I disagree..

You don't try to hold the hand of people who so not welcome it. Our trout fisheries are living proof that catch and release anglers do not need their hands held.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I do. I use a net and I don't touch the fish almost all of the time. If I want a photo, the person taking the photo has to be ready by the time I have landed the fish, or the fish goes back. I have missed out on a lot of photos.

If I want to take a fish out of the water for 2 seconds, for a photo, I am going to do it. All this hyper vigilance about fish never leaving the net has no basis in reality and seems to be more about virtue signaling.


How many times can I smash the like button on this post?
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Premium
I don't think most of the trout folks are the ones needing their hands held (hence the "folks who can't manage their own behavior"). But others do, this is why there are rules & laws....
 

speedbird49

Active Member
i have fished single hooks barbless since 1975. all of my strait fishing was done with my saltwater flies, matching the hatch don't you know, or occasionally 'coho killers', small hunks of hardware also with single hooks, barbless.

one of the big problems with coho is once they spot your boat they will often times start rolling and that is where the damage occurs. a simple change in regulations, first two fish (or whatever the daily limit might be) would solve all of this and keep thousands of unclipped fish from being stressed.
I go over this thread anytime I feel guilty about a bad release and I have to agree that for saltwater boat fishermen or at least vessels past a certain size, a catch and keep policy might be better. On my Dads boat it is impossible to release fish while keeping them in the water unless you go for a swim with them. (Need to look into dehookers) Despite the laws, plenty of people are going to bring fish over the gunwales, and most of the nets I see out on the water are not knotless. (Including my own for the time being, so I don't take it out without positively identifying a keeper). I have to imagine that fighting the drag from the heavier gear used during trolling, the downrigger ball on occasions when small fish aren't detected for a long time, and the drag from the boat itself is going to also put a lot more stress on the fish than fighting a shore fisherman. And while spoons and hoochies are more common than herring, a lot of fishermen still do use bait or at least baitstrips. You also can't hold a fish and give it time to recover when you fish from a boat
 

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