Rio Technical Trout DT4F review

Garin

New Member
I got in the new Rio Premier technical trout double taper 4 weight floating line and wanted to do a review. I previously had on the Rio select trout premiere floating line and decided to try out a double taper for the first time . The new technical trout double taper line was OK at best. It did not perform anywhere near what the select trout premier floating line does. I gave it several times out on the water but always ended up in frustration. I could not keep the loop open or drop a small dry without piling up in the water ahead of me. The DT line seems stiff and has a bad habit of taking a set memory being on the spool. The line starts out really thin and gains diameter pretty far back and just wouldn’t work with my Sage VXP or ZAxis. Don’t really understand it but for $119 it was lack luster. Just took it off and put the old line back on the Galvin Torque I mainly use. The Select Trout premier line is a few seasons old and works awesome, just thought the new DT might be a step up. It will be used for nymphing if it can do that.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Great review, thanks for posting.... Would be curious to see how many people fish a double taper anymore?
I fish a cortland DT4 for small streams and have a sylk dt6 for my bamboo rod. Don't know about brands, but a DT works for me for rolls, sidearms and short delicate casts. It needs to match the rod right to load at the distances you need it to work at, and works better with slower action rods. It's also my euro-nymph base line.
I use weight forwards for lakes, long casts, big flies, and/or heavy water. These work better with my faster rods.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Cortland 444 DTF3 for my TFO Finesse and a lovely 7' Pennington cane rod that's rated as a 4 weight but casts the 3 weight line beautifully.
Are both your rods a little slower in action also? I think we fish similar types of smaller water sometimes.
Oh, @Garin thx for the review. Mines getting beat up.
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Are both your rods a little slower in action also? I think we fish similar types of smaller water sometimes.
Oh, @Garin thx for the review. Mines getting beat up.
The TFO 3 weight is 7'9" with a "traditional" action that I assume is supposed to mimic glass or bamboo. My 7' bamboo rod has a Garrison 201 taper which is supposed to be a progressive medium action.

They can both cast nicely to beyond 30' but neither fish well beyond 20' or so because their short lengths limit their mending ability in complex cross currents, and the soft action also gets better hooksets at the shorter distance. Quite frankly though I find my Tenkara rods more effective at that distance because I have much better drift control and strike sensitivity with a high tight line, holding it all off the water.

Yes I believe we do enjoy fishing the same types of water. There is (what looks to be) some small water in your area I'd love to fish.
 
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Garin

New Member
It very well could be the action of my rods not wanting to work as well with this DT Rio line but I am not sure many rods will just for the fact of the stiffness of the line which probably is the result of it taking a memory of it being on the spool. I would get the line out and it would have curl after curl of line on the water. It also would cause the leader and tippet to be pulled back toward me as the dry was being laid down. I would fight mending the line to get it corrected at the start of the drift but most of the time I would be a good distance off the seam and the scrunched up, curled up line took to much time to be corrected that I was past the zone. It was like casting a spring. It would go out with effort put into the cast and as it is coming to lie down on the water it would retract itself as a spring would leaving you with coils and the leader/tippet all piled up. Never a nice straight line.
 

Jack Devlin

Active Member
Great review, thanks for posting.... Would be curious to see how many people fish a double taper anymore?
I use Double Tapers with my smaller weight rods. Often times, the front taper is the same on a weight forward as it is on a double taper of the same model line. So, if the majority of your casts are of a distance less than the belly and rear taper length of a weight forward you will never realize any benefit from the weight forward. In that case, the double taper line is the better choice because you are really getting two lines for the price of one. The double taper line can be reversed should one end wear or get damaged. Both ends of a double taper line are the same.
 
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MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
the stiffness of the line which probably is the result of it taking a memory of it being on the spool. I would get the line out and it would have curl after curl of line on the water. It also would cause the leader and tippet to be pulled back toward me as the dry was being laid down.
This is the part of your review that would cause me pause when I go to purchase. Thanks. I have a old cortland sink tip like this. If I haven't used it recently I will clean it a day ahead, and wind on loosely. On really hot days it OK, but one more thing to pay attention too.
I don't like to tug or stretch a line to straighten it, so I usually play in a warm up spot for a few minutes to make sure my line, leader and flies a running correctly before I get to where I really start fishing.
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
I would have expected a double taper line to have the same or almost the same diameter throughout the line since one of the advantages is to be able to reverse the line to get more years out of it. So the comment about the line diameter starting out thin and then gaining diameter quickly, doesn't sound like a true double taper line to me.

@Jack Devlin you had posted as I was writing. Thanks for confirming my thoughts :)
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter

Nooksack Mac

Active Member
Here are some photos of the line just pulled off the reel and exactly how it curled up on my desk. You can even lay the curls on the side like a spring horizontally. https://i.imgur.com/dvoruaP_d.jpg?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&fidelity=medium and https://i.imgur.com/v4OkeoO_d.jpg?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&fidelity=medium

Garin, kinks in a line can usually be straightened out by pulling a section between your outstretched hands for five or six seconds, then doing the next section, etc. If the coils persist in a new line, send it back to the maker and demand a refund.

As a general principle, if I'm fishing where distance is important, such as on lakes and bigger streams, I'd rather have a weight forward line. If I'm casting for demanding presentation, at smaller distances, I'd prefer a double taper line. From a lot of testing, I find that there's only a 5-10 foot difference between maximum casting distances, although I have to work harder to make a long cast with a double taper. One of the advantages of fishing with a double taper is that I can concentrate on the cast and what the fish is doing without looking at the line to locate the color change/rear taper. Weight forwards are casting machines; double tapers are fishing tools.
 
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