WA State Slashes Hatcheries

Lance Magnuson

WFF Supporter
Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife faces 15% budget cuts – salmon and trout hatcheries to close
News

by
editorial staff
-
14 August 2020
“Why cut something that’s going to generate sales tax?”. State faces large cuts to salmon and trout production.
The Lens reports that the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is facing deep cuts to its hatchery capacities, mandated by Governor Jay Inslee.
The Governor’s Office of Financial Management provided budget development instructions to state agencies, asking them to identify 15 per-cent reduction – around USD 24 million in spending cuts – in State General Fund. For WDFW, those reductions include:
USD 5.2 million slashed from salmon and steelhead hatchery production as well as USD 2 million from trout hatchery production.
“Under the proposed budget reduction plan, six salmon and steelhead hatcheries would be closed, while four trout hatcheries would be closed. The result would be a 7.2 per-cent and 12.3 per-cent reduction in statewide salmon and trout production, respectively. As part of the budget cuts, hatchery maintenance and repairs for critical infrastructure would be reduced by 32 percent,” wrote The Lens.
The publication reported that Commissioner Dave Graybill said fewer fishing opportunities would “reduce our ability to sell licenses when we reduce the amount of fish being produced both inland and on Puget Sound and the coast. Wherever these occur it’s going to create ill will.”
Commissioner Don McIsaac asked, “why cut something that’s going to generate sales tax?”
“The lack of sales tax is why we’re in this problem. (We) cut $2 million and then cut another $5 million because of the impacts to the state on sales tax,” added McIsaac.
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife operates dozens of fish hatcheries around the state with fish raised for sport fishing as well as commercial fishing.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
50 years ago Washington State had outstanding fishing. The Steelhead used to run up the rivers in schools like the salmon did. Now they come in the rivers one or two at a time. You never see a pair of them swimming together anymore. It's always a single fish. Some do manage to spawn because you used to see the fry swimming in the slack water in the middle of summer. And as the summers are getting warmer all that slack water will dry up along with the fry.

Now with all the money going away. In a few years there will be nothing left to fish for. Plus they will probably raise the cost of your fishing license.
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife faces 15% budget cuts – salmon and trout hatcheries to close
News

by
editorial staff
-
14 August 2020
“Why cut something that’s going to generate sales tax?”. State faces large cuts to salmon and trout production.
The Lens reports that the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is facing deep cuts to its hatchery capacities, mandated by Governor Jay Inslee.
The Governor’s Office of Financial Management provided budget development instructions to state agencies, asking them to identify 15 per-cent reduction – around USD 24 million in spending cuts – in State General Fund. For WDFW, those reductions include:
USD 5.2 million slashed from salmon and steelhead hatchery production as well as USD 2 million from trout hatchery production.
“Under the proposed budget reduction plan, six salmon and steelhead hatcheries would be closed, while four trout hatcheries would be closed. The result would be a 7.2 per-cent and 12.3 per-cent reduction in statewide salmon and trout production, respectively. As part of the budget cuts, hatchery maintenance and repairs for critical infrastructure would be reduced by 32 percent,” wrote The Lens.
The publication reported that Commissioner Dave Graybill said fewer fishing opportunities would “reduce our ability to sell licenses when we reduce the amount of fish being produced both inland and on Puget Sound and the coast. Wherever these occur it’s going to create ill will.”
Commissioner Don McIsaac asked, “why cut something that’s going to generate sales tax?”
“The lack of sales tax is why we’re in this problem. (We) cut $2 million and then cut another $5 million because of the impacts to the state on sales tax,” added McIsaac.
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife operates dozens of fish hatcheries around the state with fish raised for sport fishing as well as commercial fishing.
I have an idea, why not use the $40 million fund used to help illegal aliens because of the virus? That should cover the shortfall and reduce the pressure on the fishery as well as our other social support systems!
 

Spelunker

Active Member
a 15% cut given the absolute shit sandwich this year has been doesn't seem all that awful to me. But I admit, I'm pretty ignorant on the workings of this state or is f&w department.
 

Nomad53

New Member
Budgets are simple, broken up into many parts. Getting those in charge of managing the budgets to decide which parts are important and where to make the painful cuts is where the difficulty comes into play.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
When I bought my first fishing license in Washington State, I think I paid $3.50 for a year. It enabled me to fish where I wanted and the limit was 16 fish over 6" in length. All punch cards were free. You only needed a punch card for Steelhead and Salmon. They didn't have all the nilly dilly ones you need now.
 

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