Backyard visitor

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
I always note aquatic insects that visit my backyard, since I’m not right on any water and the closest is about a quarter mile away and just a ti-neeny crick.

My wife laughed as I stopped mid convo to snatch this specimen from the air (breaking its leg off; sorry man).

I’d call this a Baetis spp. And I’d probably be wrong. :p Ventral side was a light olive color.
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Buzzy

Active Member
We have the Main West Canal (Columbia Basin Irrigation) about 200 yards from our house. We get callibaetis quite often, lots of midges and more surprisingly to me, a lot of damselflies and dragonflies.
 

Taxon

WFF Moderator
Hi Matt-

I believe this female imago is probably not of family Baetidae, as the hind wings are not appropriately the shaped for that family. My best guess is that it may be of genus Paraleptophlebia or of genus Neoleptophlebia, and be missing not only a foreleg, but also its third tail.

Assuming it was photographed in Washington, I might be able to narrow it down further by knowing the county.
 

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
Hi Matt-

I believe this female imago is probably not of family Baetidae, as the hind wings are not appropriately the shaped for that family. My best guess is that it may be of genus Paraleptophlebia or of genus Neoleptophlebia, and be missing not only a foreleg, but also its third tail.

Assuming it was photographed in Washington, I might be able to narrow it down further by knowing the county.
Hi Taxon,
Some people call it Sh!thole County but on the vast majority of the maps it says King.

Thanks for confirming I was right about probably being wrong. :p
 

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
Hi Matt-

I believe this female imago is probably not of family Baetidae, as the hind wings are not appropriately the shaped for that family. My best guess is that it may be of genus Paraleptophlebia or of genus Neoleptophlebia, and be missing not only a foreleg, but also its third tail.

Assuming it was photographed in Washington, I might be able to narrow it down further by knowing the county.
Roger,

My reply probably seems really unnecessary. It’s a reference to something else from the forum. Sorry if I shouldn’t have let it bleed over into this civilized corner.
King County, ~200 feet elevation
 

Troutnut

Active Member
Definitely not Baetidae. My hunch is it's not Leptophlebiidae either. The sort of flattened look of the head/legs and strong venation and tinting in the wings is more suggestive of Heptageniidae to me, possibly Cinygmula.
 

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