NFR Logging a small slice. Am I part of the habitat problem? My chance to do right...or wrong

Gyrfalcon21

Active Member
For sure, leaving the timber as is, or carefully thinning is priority. One thing I did not make really clear is that it was probably never properly replanted once it was picked clean while not being watched 50 years back. Am guessing it could use some newer seedling in there.

I am no forester and have no idea if much other than Alder reseeded itself, so getting proper trees in the there for the long haul would be ideal and part of the reason to mess with the area at all.

Thanks for all thoughts, really appreciate it!
 
Last edited:
B

bennysbuddy

Probably should just rake it.
the trouble with having somebody rake it with a forestry rake attached to a dozer is it tears up the ground fairly bad & then you have slash piles to burn come winter
 

BaldBob

Retired- Navy Captain,Forester,Forestry Consultant
I recommend you go to the Association of Consulting Foresters website (www.acf-foresters.org) and find consulting foresters near your property. For 40 acres of coast timberland, its well worth developing a management plan that meets your objectives for the land, whether that be income (present and/or future), wildlife habitat, carbon credits, aesthetics, or some mix of the above. A consulting forester will work for you and help you achieve whatever your objectives may be. They may quote you a fee by the day, hour, job, or in the case of a timber sale, by a percentage of the sale price (generally 10-15%). I would walk the land with the consulting forester and discuss and develop your objectives.

In most cases their knowledge of the markets and players will get enough more return from the sale to more than cover their fee. If you do decide to log, they can review the contract and monitor the work to assure that you get the result you expect. Also if a selective harvest is warranted, they will mark the appropriate trees for harvest to achieve the desired objectives,and you can review the marking prior to harvest. Members of the ACF are sworn to a strict code of ethics, which you can read on their website.
 

tallguy

Active Member
My parents got a bit burned with a similar situation back east on the home front. Neighbor was logging some land, made the "equipment is here, why not cut a bit" argument. What was supposed to be a very selective harvest with picked trees, etc turned into a "cut everything valuable" and a lot rougher looking piece of land at the end.

Never forget they want to make money, as much as possible, and they aren't actually doing you any favors.. just be sure your head is up.
 

John svah

Active Member
Sent you a pm i think... i manage a bunch of non profit owned timberland in norcal. We often thin for habitat improvement and fuels managment via full suspension logging, mastication of non merchantable material, and to open the canopy. Around here overstocked forests suck up too much water which drought stresses the whole stand. So we log for a healthier forest! Also we select for species that dominated in the times of pre industrial timber production. Not sure how applicable this all is to western washington. Most of the forest we own/ manage probably receive similar amounts of precip but it is all winter snow followed by 5 months of no precip. Ymmv
 

bconrad

Active Member
Lots of good advice in this thread. I would echo the recommendation from BaldBob, give a consulting forester a few hundred bucks and spend half the day walking the property and talking through options. You'll get a much better understanding of different management options, the potential dollars involved, and the difficulty of permitting the sale and removing the wood.

I would not agree to let the neighbors cross the property line until you meet with the consultant. In my opinion when selecting a consultant you want a "soup to nuts" individual that can market the timber, administer the sale, complete the FPA, provide oversight to the logging contractor, and ensure replanting requirements are fulfilled.

Even if you don't move forward with any action, having someone that does the full complement of timber sale work will leave you with a better understanding of your options than just getting a cruiser to quote you a number.
 

wetline dave

Active Member
In that the neighbor is going to log If it were me I would get that property line surveyed and be there and know exactly where it is. I would not trust his survey as the corner stakes have been known to get repositioned. I would also take the time to be there when the logging was going on.

A little encroachment and 50 or 6o trees later and it was an oops the logger got carried away, sorry.

Dave
 

cdnred

Active Member
A little encroachment and 50 or 6o trees later and it was an oops the logger got carried away, sorry.
As was posted at the beginning of this thread..

"All I know is that the old growth Cedar and such was taken off/stolen decades (50 years ago?) ago. All that was left was barren 40-ish acres of land. I think it has reseeded itself somewhat pretty well."

That should give you a good heads up on the honesty of some people. They'll just claim a mistake was made, tell ya to pound salt and then it's up to you to start the lengthy law suit to recover your losses. Either way I don't see a happy ending here. In fact to protect your property from these loggers, you'll need to have the property line staked out and you'll end up having to camp there for the duration just to watch them every minute. Being that the property is far off the road (inaccessible), I'm sure they'll try and pull a stunt like that because no one will be watching..
 

jwg

Active Member
Logging. To cut or not to cut.

Fishing Site related: Fish/habitat angle. I despise what logging has done to the northwest. And here I am with this situation I inherited, literally. Am I telling myself that if cut/thinned (do not think this little cut or the whole thing is true forest), that a cutting + replant will be great habitat for many decades ahead for the water and creatures?

Here is what fell into our lap. We have some acreage tucked into the coast, been in the family for 70+ years. It is timber/forest..sort of. Have never been there as there is no road to it, not far off a decent sized paved road, however. Mile or two in? Inland maybe 15 miles from the ocean. Cannot build there ever. All I know is that the old growth Cedar and such was taken off/stolen decades (50 years ago?) ago. All that was left was barren 40-ish acres of land. I think it has reseeded itself somewhat pretty well. Have flown over with Google Earth.

We get letters from companies every now and then offering us tiny $ for the land. I talked to one 5 years ago last. Went nowhere. $5k for 40 acres with timber on it? No way. Vultures for sure in that business. (all businesses, am sure).

A couple weeks back another letter comes in and I let it sit, finally I open it. The neighbors next to us on the property up there are a logging company and they are right now logging theirs. They say that we have a small area bordering theirs that they could cut trees up to a creek. I can see from Google Earth the creek might only be seasonal..not sure. They say that our little piece there has what "looks to be mature timber that looks to have significant value."
"If you have been considering harvesting your timber, this might be an inexpensive and excellent time to."

OK, I have made a few bad calls trusting people in smaller business things in life so I am fully prepared to think that unless cleared, most people are out to screw you.
I emailed them last week just to feel it out and they promptly said that they would send a proposal soon, that was Thurs, their forester needed to talk to me as well. Also, they said I should jump on a permit from the DNR asap.

OK. Being that access for me is pretty much zip-they have secured access from the North which must be from a slew of odds and end logging roads, I cannot get in to see. Plus, I have no idea what I am looking at.

I guess just running by folks here to see obvious rookie red flags, see a trap, anything that is typical logging company bs stuff? I checked the company online and they have been in the business decade and half, like all online reviews, they have all perfect then a couple of total clunkers saying to avoid. Like a 4.7/5 on about 15-20 reviews. No BBB info.

Assume the best thing to do is run a independent guy in there and check the property line and see what trees we have overall. Probably an expense I was not ready for.
This is on flat forest land, not headwater stuff, so that would ease my mind to cut. Not bird nesting season. The entire area near is logged in bits and pieces, not too bad. I'd have to read laws on slash burning/replanting. The cost, access to have that done and make sure I do not create a bigger headache than before. Very paranoid that I will miss something and make this a financial and environmental snafu.

Lots of stuff there and thanks if anyone made it this far.

Just a word or two if inspired to do so, thoughts would be fantastic of bigger things to watch out for. My one and only time on logging I think. But this opportunity came up pretty fast, also makes me suspect something odd is up?

Thanks for reading ! PM Is fine, appreciate any thoughts/criticisms

John
If you do deal, can you negotiate in a permanent easement or something for your own access to the property?

J
 

cdnred

Active Member
If you do deal, can you negotiate in a permanent easement or something for your own access to the property?
That really shouldn't be that big of a deal unless you're trespassing in order to get there. The loggers will need to build a road or trail anyways to access the site so if easement is needed, they would've had to get easement permit first in order to get it. Then it would just come down to keeping the road/trail cleared out and open. Either way with the property more or less being somewhat land locked (or it might not be..?), a deal of some sort would need to get sorted out first hand. At least if given the go ahead for using the road, you'd be able to make use of the property for whatever reason you'd like. Are there any rivers running thru the property or nearby that you could get access to fish or you could build a cabin to use as a retreat..?
 

WAS

Active Member
In that the neighbor is going to log If it were me I would get that property line surveyed and be there and know exactly where it is. I would not trust his survey as the corner stakes have been known to get repositioned. I would also take the time to be there when the logging was going on.

A little encroachment and 50 or 6o trees later and it was an oops the logger got carried away, sorry.

Dave

This happens a lot. I would be on top of this from the get-go.
 

Salmo_g

WFF Supporter
In that the neighbor is going to log If it were me I would get that property line surveyed and be there and know exactly where it is. I would not trust his survey as the corner stakes have been known to get repositioned. I would also take the time to be there when the logging was going on.

A little encroachment and 50 or 6o trees later and it was an oops the logger got carried away, sorry.

Dave

Cutting someone else's trees across a property line is high risk in WA. State law awards triple damages for fudging and taking another's timber. It's simply not worth it to most operators with anything to lose. I presume that is why timber harvest units are so intensely laid out, pretty much every tree along the unit boundary line is marked.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top