WSJ article about fly fishing

JesseC

Active Member
The article states that fly fishing is increasing by 6% yoy.

That’s a questionable surprise to me. If you look at Google trends, which will give you a search volume yoy, you can see fly fishing terms declining for the past couple years.

If the growth is true, it would be welcome news, but I find it hard to believe.
 

JayB

Active Member
"A River Runs Through It" Part Two. Fantastic buyers market in lightly used wicker creels a couple of years after the first one comes out.

Another notable memory from that era was watching what I presumed was a middle aged man who I presume was out looking for a newfound source of inner peace and tranquility in roughly $3K worth of brand new Orvis gear get his legs entangled in the line he'd been stripping back in, flail backwards into the river, and unleash an inspired stream of high-octane profanity as he was being sloshed downstream.

At 17 I was pretty unsympathetic and figured the guy was simply earning the wages of trend-chasing poserdom. Now that I'm a middle aged guy with more money than time who'd flail around just as badly in brand-new gear if I tried to learn some new hobby I feel for the guy.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
If the growth is true, it would be welcome news, but I find it hard to believe.

I also find it hard to believe. When the first boom hit from A River Runs Through It there were a lot of folks moving from one outdoor activity to another : Windsurfing, hiking, Xcountry Skiing, rock climbing, etc. Nowadays you simply don't see a lot of folks involved in outdoor activities.

Especially fishing. I know in the NW the sales of fishing licenses has been steadily declining for years.

I just don't see the same interest in sports afield these days as I did when "the movie" had such an impact on the sport of flyfishing.
 

Greg Armstrong

WFF Supporter
I also find it hard to believe. When the first boom hit from A River Runs Through It there were a lot of folks moving from one outdoor activity to another : Windsurfing, hiking, Xcountry Skiing, rock climbing, etc. Nowadays you simply don't see a lot of folks involved in outdoor activities.

Especially fishing. I know in the NW the sales of fishing licenses has been steadily declining for years.

I just don't see the same interest in sports afield these days as I did when "the movie" had such an impact on the sport of flyfishing.
I'm surprised at this GAT. I see more. A lot more.

As an example, try to find a parking spot (on almost any day of the week now) at most any of our trailheads and you'll quickly see what I mean.
I haven't been in an REI since covid, but the place was jam packed prior.

As far as fishing goes, at least trout fishing on creeks and rivers where I've fished for years I'm seeing a lot more fishermen and women. That's not necessarily all a bad thing, but finding solitude trout fishing around here is much more difficult to accomplish these days.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
I'm surprised at this GAT. I see more. A lot more.

As an example, try to find a parking spot (on almost any day of the week now) at most any of our trailheads and you'll quickly see what I mean.
I haven't been in an REI since covid, but the place was jam packed prior.

As far as fishing goes, at least trout fishing on creeks and rivers where I've fished for years I'm seeing a lot more fishermen and women. That's not necessarily all a bad thing, but finding solitude trout fishing around here is much more difficult to accomplish these days.
I know, there does seem to be more at the popular spots but in my case, my spots have dwindled over the years so those who are still fishing are all piled into the same area.

At 69 I've seen many, many of my fishing spots shut down by no trespassing signs, drop in the numbers of fish, etc.

And it is a fact that license sales are down ... regardless of how many people we see fishing.

I've lost so many moving water fishing spots I now only fish stillwaters ... it's hard to be crowded out on a lake.
 

Greg Armstrong

WFF Supporter
I know, there does seem to be more at the popular spots but in my case, my spots have dwindled over the years so those who are still fishing are all piled into the same area.

At 69 I've seen many, many of my fishing spots shut down by no trespassing signs, drop in the numbers of fish, etc.

And it is a fact that license sales are down ... regardless of how many people we see fishing.

I've lost so many moving water fishing spots I now only fish stillwaters ... it's hard to be crowded out on a lake.
I'm 67 in a couple of months. I feel your pain. :cool:
 

kinigit

Active Member
There has also been a lot of much lower price, high quality equipment introduced to the market. TFO, Orvis Clearwater, and a ton of generics. You can now get a rod that is 90% of the absolute best for 80% less cost. It certainly opens it up to more people. My dad bought me my first fly rod when I was a kid (~30 years ago) and it was junk compared to the entry level equipment now.

Obviously the pandemic is pushing more people to outdoor activities also. There are shortages in car bike racks, camping stuff, etc.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
There has also been a lot of much lower price, high quality equipment introduced to the market. TFO, Orvis Clearwater, and a ton of generics. You can now get a rod that is 90% of the absolute best for 80% less cost. It certainly opens it up to more people. My dad bought me my first fly rod when I was a kid (~30 years ago) and it was junk compared to the entry level equipment now.

Obviously the pandemic is pushing more people to outdoor activities also. There are shortages in car bike racks, camping stuff, etc.
You could be right. I haven't gone fishing once this year due my concern over the pandemic ... I'm in the high risk range ... so there could be a ton more people out there but I wouldn't know it.
 

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