steelhead spinning reel

JM

Active Member
The spinning reels made today are filled constructed with sealed ball bearings unlike my first steelhead reel in 1961 pictured. I believe that this was the first spinning reel produced that the handle could go on either side. My dad won this reel on a punch board along with a w&m spin rod when I was 10. If you are going to fish braid I would go with a smaller reel like a 2500 or smaller as they will hold plenty of line. If fishing mono I like a 3000 series for 10 to 12lb mono. Great for fishing spoons and spinners.
 

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aplTyler

Inept Steelheader
Size wise, stick with 30/300/3000 series reels, depending on the manufacturer. I prefer something a bit lighter, and will use 25/2500 series reels in some cases.

Okuma Ceymar for a decent value reel ($40-50), but the Shimano Sedona ($70) and Shimano Nasci ($100) are excellent choices if you want to spend a few more bucks. They will all work!

The challenge is finding anything in those sizes right now. After covid hit, the retailers and manufacturers saw big sales in gear, but factories are/were still closed and unable to resupply. Starting to see more terminal tackle and rods coming back into stock. Hoping to see reels come back in soon too.
 

Slipstream

Active Member
When I started fishing the Klick many of the locals were beating up on the steelies with a fly rod, an automatic fly reel (loaded with mono) and a few split shot. They didn't seem to understand why anyone would use a coffee grinder for fishing. Bait of choice was usually a cased caddis, salmon fly, grasshopper or any other morsel they could impale on a bucktail fly tied on #2 hook.
Were they fly fishing?
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
When I started fishing the Klick many of the locals were beating up on the steelies with a fly rod, an automatic fly reel (loaded with mono) and a few split shot. They didn't seem to understand why anyone would use a coffee grinder for fishing. Bait of choice was usually a cased caddis, salmon fly, grasshopper or any other morsel they could impale on a bucktail fly tied on #2 hook.
Were they fly fishing?
It would depend on what year this was going on. The regs used to define flyfishing and it included 30' of flyline in the definition. I haven't looked at the regulation definition of fly fishing for a number of years though.
 

Slipstream

Active Member
It would depend on what year this was going on. The regs used to define flyfishing and it included 30' of flyline in the definition. I haven't looked at the regulation definition of fly fishing for a number of years though.
About 45 years ago.
 

BDD

Active Member
I agree with WW. Back then there was no need to make an impression on others that you were fly fishing...nobody cared. But in the traditional sense at the time (and some folks say it should still be so, whether from a regulation standpoint or not) that split shot and bait, even on a fly rod and automatic reel, would not have been fly fishing...then by tradition and now by regulation.
 

Slipstream

Active Member
Back then I don't think many folks cared.
No one should care now. To my knowledge the WDFW has never defined fly fishing in the regulations. A large number of anglers mistakenly assume that the definition for "Fly Fishing Only" waters is a definition for "fly fishing". "FFO" water definition limits the equipment that is allowed on those designated waters only. Those old boys on the Klick in the '70-'80's were just using the gear that they had at the time.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
A large number of anglers mistakenly assume that the definition for "Fly Fishing Only" waters is a definition for "fly fishing". "FFO" water definition limits the equipment that is allowed on those designated waters only.
Close enough!
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Haven't you guys ever fished a spinning reel on your fly rod with a clear spin bubble and fly? :)
A muddler minnow a couple split shot and clear bubble was an effective trout catching combination on the upper Klamath, (sorry, steelhead forum - I don't believe there were any steelhead in the Klamath between John C Boyle and Keno dams circa 1975-78) I didn't have a flyrod back then but I considered it "fly fishing'.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
I used a level winder for my Steelhead fishing. And, fuck I forgot what is was called. It's been a lot of years since I fished that way. It was a red one and I paid a few bucks for it. I have also used the Mitchell 300 and I also had a 400. I really liked them reels.

Others mentioned the Abu Garcia reels but could it have been a Penn?
 

wetline dave

Active Member
Probably the two most common casting reels back then were the Abu Garcia and the Pfluger Supreme. Still have my Pfluger.

Dave
 

Gyrfalcon2020

Honoring Vets
Back in the late 70's the metal shop teacher had a gang of cretins (us fishing kids) buildling graphite Fenwick GFS 83c casting rods.

The millworking dads of the era with Elvis hair and sideburns were Ambassadeur 5000 guys. At some point some kid brought in a Bass Pro flier that had new to the market discounted Shimano low-profile reels that fit the bill of cheap, and pissing off the old man appeal.

Good reels.
 

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