Fishing Life Hacks

Jim Travers

Active Member

Don't put your beer down on the water​


I've been really dying on this hill after seein' guys gettin' PISSED after they set their beer down on the water surface when float tubin'. Even done it myself!! Seems like it'll work like a table or something but then the beer sinks!!

One time Stewart Jones set a whole 24 rack of coors down on Moses lake
 
Last edited:

Jake

Active Member

Rinse Your Reel As You Drive​

  1. Buy a square 1 gallon water jug if you don’t already have one. If you do, skip to step 3.
  2. Pour the water into your fishing water bottle/camelback
  3. Cut the top off of the water jug so you’ve got a square bucket.
  4. When you’re done fishing for the day, pour your remaining water into the bucket
  5. Drive home.
  6. Remove reel from its fresh water bath.
  7. Put reel back on rod.
  8. Leave setup in car to dry and be ready for tomorrow.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Zak

Jake

Active Member

Add Waterproof Hydration Port to Waterproof Fishing Pack​


Posted this a while ago, but here it is again. If I were a betting man I’d say I wouldn’t be terribly surprised to see something strikingly similar on future Fishpond waterproof packs.


I love my Fishpond Thunderhead Submersible Backpack, but until now there wasn’t a way for me to add a hydration pack. This led me to rely on water bottles that I forget to drink out of or, if I do remember, require that I open my pack—not great in a rainstorm, and inconvenient at the best of times. I knew there had to be a better way, so I made one.

Manufacturers get scared about adding holes, for good reason, so they don’t usually build them into their waterproof packs, but by using a waterproof compression fitting (plumbing part) I was able to add a port for a hydration pack tube AND keep my pack waterproof.

$10 and 10 minutes of work time and you can add a waterproof hydration port to any waterproof sling, backpack, etc.

1. Buy this part. $10 gets you one, but since you’re only using half of it, it’s enough fittings for two packs. You could split the cost with a friend.

EDIT: I found one that should work for much, much cheaper (~$2), but haven’t tested it yet: https://www.mcmaster.com/5694T722/

2. Use a hack saw to cut one end of the coupler off as close as you can to the backside of the head. This is your future port. The other end is your spare/extra. In the first photo you can see the spare/extra, and in the next you can see how close to the end I cut. I’m sure your cut will be cleaner than mine. I wasn’t being very careful because this is a prototype and it’s on the inside.
0BED9424-9883-41FA-A6B6-645682040C08.jpeg


image.jpg



3. Now mark where on your pack you want to add the port/fitting.
612DF8AC-7FBC-4497-9DDA-57957DC53F0B.jpeg



4. Summon your courage and poke a hole in your pack at the center of your mark. I used sharp scissors to cut a small “X” in the material. Unscrew the fitting to see how big you need to make the “X”. The “X” should be just large enough for the threads on the inside/male part of the fitting to squeeze through, but smaller than the flange (wide part at base).
image.jpg


image.jpg



5. Push the male piece of the fitting out through the hole from the inside. You should see something like this on the inside. I forgot to take photos of the outside, but the triangles of material should be pushed up on the outside and laying tight against the threads of the male part.
image.jpg



6. Carefully cut off the triangles so they don’t cover the threads of the fitting, but leave them tight enough that they squeeze against the shaft of the fitting and cover the flange.

7. Pull all of the washers out of the fitting. Toss the metal “one-way” washer and put them back in. The proper order is the way they came out, but from the bottom up it’s the white plastic washer, then the grey one, then the rubber gasket.
1D80F29F-74B6-402E-9AC8-E97137DFDCBE.jpeg

The rubber gasket is the part that makes this fitting waterproof. As you can see, the tubing from a Camelbak (and I imagine other brands) is exactly the right size to fit the rubber gasket tightly and waterproofly. And yes, I invented a word.
27C2C7C5-10D2-452B-ACE6-9A2B29FEE858.jpeg



8. Make sure the washers are back in their proper places, then screw the female part tightly back on from the outside. Assuming you didn’t make your hole too large, this sandwiches the waterproof material of your bag between the flange on the male part and the cap/female part and makes a waterproof seal. A happy coincidence I discovered is that the “rubber“ in the bag’s material, when sandwiched in the coupler fitting, actually acts like an additional gasket and also keeps everything tightly sealed/screwed together.
1D570B1E-BF8D-42BA-9ED6-E426F37A9313.jpeg



9. Now you’ve got a waterproof fitting/port for your hydration pack. Take off the mouthpiece of your hydration pack, put it in the pack, and pass the tube through the port. It isn’t too easy, which is ideal for waterproofness (another new word!). It passes through the rubber gasket, which is your seal.
4BAE4196-3411-4442-9E68-80F3CB646281.jpeg


ED0EC623-5981-4EB7-9E64-BB608DBF43E5.jpeg



10. Now you, like I did, may wonder whether you’ve compromised your pack’s waterproofing. If you’ve used a waterproof pack before you know they’re airtight. So much so you should unzip them a small amount before flying in a plane. You can squeeze them hard (I’ve sat on mine, and I’m further above 250lbs than I ought to be) and no air seeps out. So, my first test was to zip up, then squeeze my modified backpack as hard as I could.

No air seeps out.

EDIT: I just read the specs on the fitting (polyplumb coupler). It is rated to 58 psi (4 bar), which is a sea water depth of about 98 feet. So...you’re probably okay for wading.

EDIT: Modified pack, with hydration tube in place, was submerged in 3’ of water (garbage can) for over 24 hours and it is completely dry inside. This gives it a very-informal IP67 rating.


Happy hydrating, and let me know if you want the other half of this coupling so you can mod your own.
 
Last edited:

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
Good grief. You all sound like you have to work in order to go fly fishing. I like to fly fish because it relaxes me. I get to go out in the great outdoors and smell all that's out there. If I had to make like it's work I wouldn't even go out there. How do you enjoy yourself if your worrying about one thing or another. Geeze get a life.
 

Jake

Active Member
Good grief. You all sound like you have to work in order to go fly fishing. I like to fly fish because it relaxes me. I get to go out in the great outdoors and smell all that's out there. If I had to make like it's work I wouldn't even go out there. How do you enjoy yourself if your worrying about one thing or another. Geeze get a life.
Well, it beats dehydration on the flats, and corroded reels, but you do you.
 

Snagly

Active Member
Good grief. You all sound like you have to work in order to go fly fishing. I like to fly fish because it relaxes me. I get to go out in the great outdoors and smell all that's out there. If I had to make like it's work I wouldn't even go out there. How do you enjoy yourself if your worrying about one thing or another. Geeze get a life.
I used to be like that, too, Old Man. Then a couple years ago I leaned 2 Spey and 2 singlehanded rods against the driver's side (shut) door of my rig while I pulled gear out of the bed. I returned to the door to give my buddy his 2 rods and lift my 2 for our hike to the river and . . . something wasn't right . . . I only had 3 rods in hand. WTF? Oh, lookey here . . . below my studded wading boot a glimpse of NRX graphite. The rod was broken down and I managed to put a new carbide cleat through each section. Total writeoff. What a horrible death for a fine rod.

Let me endorse the suggestions that your rods should go on the hood both coming-and-going. Then you can get your life back and learn to be One with The Universe.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zak

Snagly

Active Member

A buff is a handy option to have when winter winds begin freezing your face, or the bugs are bad (spray the fabric with DEET and not your skin).​

 

cdnred

Active Member
Probably old hat to most folks, but I didn't figure it for an embarrassingly long time. If you have a two piece rod and "reel on" case, when you break down the rod finagle the leader so it crosses the line between the two rod sections. Then you can slide the fully-rigged rod in the case and not have to string it up again when you take it out. Would work for those plastic rod sleeves, too.
Done carefully, you could do that with a 4 pc rod also..
 

dfg

Active Member
If I'm not done fishing, I place the rod on the hood of my rig over the windshield and roof. No chance of knocking it down, bumping into it or driving away without seeing it. If I'm done fishing, I put it back in the tube right away.
This works great for coffee cups and anything else that one might want to put down while unlocking the doors. It sure beats the cliche about friving down the road with a baby carrier on the roof!
 

dfg

Active Member
A guide showed me a knot that is easier to tie than an improved clinch knot (which is a really simple knot to start with), results in fewer break-offs during tightening, wastes less tippet and doesn't require adjustment to suit the thickness of the leader: the Eugene Bend. (It also gives a satisfying little click when it's tight.)

I wrap three times only (Three shall be the number. Four thou shalt not count...) before threading the tag end through the loop. I haven't lost a fly due to tying failure since I started using it.


1606069269096.png
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top