Trip Report - SRC first season

VMP

Active Member
Hmm, upon further review, I think you're right about this great sculpin identification. Shitballs. There goes that world record.

Good thing I'm not an ichthyologist!
All good, what goes around comes around, I most certainly have and probably will continue to mis-ID a few marine mammals that you would know in a heartbeat, and I have done my fair share of mis-ID fish too. As per the record or no record, in current and unfortunately likely foreseeable times of changing, uncertain and often diminishing fishing opportunities it seems important to enjoy and find something memorable in any outing and catch (even the skunk days!), with the right attitude it makes for a more fulfilling experience, from your opening post it seems you do that, so more power to you!
 

adamcu280

Active Member
All good, what goes around comes around, I most certainly have and probably will continue to mis-ID a few marine mammals that you would know in a heartbeat, and I have done my fair share of mis-ID fish too. As per the record or no record, in current and unfortunately likely foreseeable times of changing, uncertain and often diminishing fishing opportunities it seems important to enjoy and find something memorable in any outing and catch (even the skunk days!), with the right attitude it makes for a more fulfilling experience, from your opening post it seems you do that, so more power to you!
Even experienced observers mis-ID stuff all the time. At least I had a photo so someone could show me the error of my ways! Thanks for the learning opportunity!

It's still my personal record so there's that.
 

adamcu280

Active Member
I thought my last day of work was going to be a rainy mess but it turned out being a gorgeous day! I was able to get these two beauties on back to back casts. The first one's in my top 5 and the next one is number 1! I didn't bother taking a photo of the third one since it was only a foot long.

Got all of them on my pearl and pink bugger. Gonna have to tie up some more of them since they clearly work.

First fish of the day. If this was it I'd have been over the moon.
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Second fish of the day and the biggest one yet!! What a day to end on!
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And now it's time to head back to the mountains. It's been a great couple of months chasing these wonderful fish.
 

speedbird49

Active Member
I guess I haven't seen enough N. Sound fish or any South Sound fish to notice a difference between them and HC fish.
Every South Sound or OP Cutthroat I have seen pictures of is a deep dark gold and covered in lots of little spots. The North Sound Cutty's I caught were with one exception speckled with larger spots, and more yellow than golden with a couple being practically silver.

Then again maybe I haven't seen enough pictures or caught enough trout and this variation is all over the sound
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
I mainly fish the canal and south sound, but at this time of the year you can catch cutts in the same day that are bright and show no color, some with yellow fins and others that are approaching butter ball status with golden hues.

That is the cool thing about them. They are all somewhat unique in their own way.
SF
 

Jake

Active Member
Every South Sound or OP Cutthroat I have seen pictures of is a deep dark gold and covered in lots of little spots. The North Sound Cutty's I caught were with one exception speckled with larger spots, and more yellow than golden with a couple being practically silver.

Then again maybe I haven't seen enough pictures or caught enough trout and this variation is all over the sound

I’m not a marine biologist so I could have this all wrong—and if I do please someone educate me because I’d love to know more and have more accurate knowledge:

My understanding is that, aside from individual variation, the coloration of sea runs also has to do with how recently they’ve been up freshwater (if you find them in the Sound) or how recently they’ve been in the salt (if you find them in a river). According to the Coastal Cutthroat Coalition’s ongoing studies they seem to move in and out of freshwater multiple times per year—and not as enmasse as salmon. Therefore the colored up fish may have been upriver more recently than the saltwater-silver one.

In my experience, North Sound tends to have longer and bigger rivers/creeks/streams, and South Sound tends to have shorter and smaller rivers/creeks/streams. It is my understanding that compared to North Sound rivers/creeks/streams they tend to spend less time up South Sound rivers but may make more trips.
 

speedbird49

Active Member
I’m not a marine biologist so I could have this all wrong—and if I do please someone educate me because I’d love to know more and have more accurate knowledge:

My understanding is that, aside from individual variation, the coloration of sea runs also has to do with how recently they’ve been up freshwater (if you find them in the Sound) or how recently they’ve been in the salt (if you find them in a river). According to the Coastal Cutthroat Coalition’s ongoing studies they seem to move in and out of freshwater multiple times per year—and not as enmasse as salmon. Therefore the colored up fish may have been upriver more recently than the saltwater-silver one.

In my experience, North Sound tends to have longer and bigger rivers/creeks/streams, and South Sound tends to have shorter and smaller rivers/creeks/streams. It is my understanding that compared to North Sound rivers/creeks/streams they tend to spend less time up South Sound rivers but may make more trips.
All the Cutthroat I caught were at Medowdale at the end of a small creek where Chum spawn. (I think the Chum are mostly plants but I can't be sure, the volunteer group that plants salmon doesn't clip fins like hatchery's) A sign at the park claims that Cutthroat also spawn in the creek. It is possible the Cutthroat were from that creek, but it's also possible they migrated from one of the rivers.

But that is very interesting to know
 

Bowbonehead

Active Member
Great thread.... being from Alberta I have never had the chance to chase sea run cutts ..... do they actually jump as you posted..... the only time I have seen a cutt jump here is from jaws of a bull trout.....
 

speedbird49

Active Member
Great thread.... being from Alberta I have never had the chance to chase sea run cutts ..... do they actually jump as you posted..... the only time I have seen a cutt jump here is from jaws of a bull trout.....
I see them jumping after prey almost every time I go to the beach. I have had a couple sort of flop out of the water while hooked, but nothing as impressive as a Coho
 

adamcu280

Active Member
Great thread.... being from Alberta I have never had the chance to chase sea run cutts ..... do they actually jump as you posted..... the only time I have seen a cutt jump here is from jaws of a bull trout.....
I tried to upload the raw video but it didn't work so here's an IG post from October that shows my first 18" cutty doing her third big jump of the fight. I'd often see them jump and roll while they were unhooked, but getting jumps like this when they were hooked was probably a '10-20% of the time' thing.

 

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