I've got patches on my patches on my ........

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
old blue jeans. Love AC/DC. But in this case it's my old llbean waders. And boots. Figures I just bought a rod and now I'm leaking again. I'd love some nice simms or orvis pro's but I'm pretty much done with christmas shopping and treated myself already. I just saw these redington escape zip wader for $209. Does anybody have any experience with these? I haven't been able to find too much about them. I'm going to get a pair of boots with felt soles and studs too, been slipping around to much and the waters not that high and fast yet.
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shoe goo setting
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Zak

WFF Supporter
While I was living in Vermont the state briefly banned felt soles. I went down hard several times in "stealth rubber" soled boots. Felt is much, much better. I feel fine with straight felt and no studs, personally.
 

Rocking Chair Fan

No more hot spotting
I have been using felt soles with studs for over twenty years. Except for a few places like Yellowstone National Park they are allowed. Also they are not great in boats obviously. As I get older I truly appreciate the extra grip with the studs especially with the slick bottoms of rivers in the NW like Rocking Chair Creek.
 
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Rocking Chair Fan

No more hot spotting
Korkers give you the option to switch out between soles. My pair have been holding strong with many days on the water. Just replace soles and laces as needed.

I want to investigate those when I need a new pair of boots. It is intriguing to be able to switch out. Whatever I buy you should be my last pair of boots so I want one that provides support , last a long time, and do not slide on slippery rocks in rivers.
 
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Philonius

WFF Supporter
I have a pair of Redington Sonic Pro waders that I picked up used off the classifieds here. Previous owner had blown a zipper on the chest mesh pocket and got a warrantee deal. I fixed them pretty easily and have been %100 pleased with them so far. Not sure how different the Escapes are. Never buying another pair of waders without a zip front.

I also have a pair of Korkers. First set of soles failed in just under a year, the rear elastic tab dried out and cracked. Korker replaced those, and now I make sure to leave those tabs loose between trips. Here is something I didn’t expect; after a recent visit to the S Sound and wading around in some tenacious mud, I got back to my car and discovered that BOTH soles were missing. Just got my replacements in the mail.
 

kmudgn

Active Member
For seam seepage, I have successfully used Rustoleum spray leak seal. Its just like flex seal, but cheaper. I sprayed the seams of two pair of leaky waders two seasons ago and just had to redo the knees of one pair last month. The only caution I would make is to note that you need to use only a light coating of the stuff. If not, it looks like an elephant ejaculated on your waders as the sealant dries only semi-clear. I got the stuff at Home Depot, but many places sell it

 

Guy Gregory

Active Member
I did this shit for years. I finally coughed up the cash for decent waders, I found Rio Gallego's on sale, but there's others from Dryft to Simms ... do it. You'll not regret it.
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
I have the Redington Escape waders, without the zipper. I've had some bad falls that I was certain would cause a leak, but they're still going strong.

I've been extremely impressed with Redington waders, over the last 5 years or so. They used to have really weird stocking foot sizes that kept me loyal to Simms. Since they fixed that problem, I've been all in on team red.

Felt boots will be a game changer. I persisted with rubber and studs for years, but the difference in safety is enormous. I still have my rubber boots though, for trips to Montana.
 
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Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
I had a pair of Hodgman wading boots with felt and studs. They came up over your ankles about a couple of inches. Great support. Back to the felt with studs. When they got wet they got extra heavy. And as you get older it's a bitch to walk around in them being wet.

On Korkers with the replaceable soles. I kept having the soles come loose. I fixed that problem. I just added a screw in the toe. No more soles coming off.
 

Salmo_g

WFF Supporter
And your point is???? Patching and repairing products to extend their utility is virtuous, unless you're wedded to the all too American concept of disposable everything. Hell, I've been known to darn wool wading socks when only the heels wear thin.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Felt boots will be a game changer. I persisted with rubber and studs for years, but the difference in safety is enormous. I still have my rubber boots though, for trips to Montana.
I had some Weinbrenner Borger felt sole boots in the 70s. But they slipped badly on snotty rocks. *I've never tried studded felt but one day my son took a fall on a steep muddy bank while wearing studded felt and using a wading staff but fortunately didn't go over the 4' ft vertical drop into 3' of water* so I bought a pair of bar cleat (Dan Bailey?) overshoes. They work well but were hard to get on & off.
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I bought some Chacos with rubber soles when the felt ban was raging but kept losing the studs so I relegated them to salt beaches after a couple of years.
Korkers give you the option to switch out between soles. My pair have been holding strong with many days on the water. Just replace soles and laces as needed.
+1. I bought Korkers Guide boots with the previous generation soles that come standard with rubber non-studded Kling-On and non-studded felt, but for $10 more got the optional studded Kling-On soles instead of felt for wading. They worked well. After two years I had lost some studs but couldn't replace the soles because sole version had been discontinued and replaced with the current Omnitrax sole.

I bought some Devil's Canyon boots plus additional studded King-On soles and later their Bar Cleat Kling-On soles. I wore through two sets of Bar Cleat soles over 5 years with my Devils Canyon boots but they were the best traction I've ever experienced back to the Borgers. Korkers discontinued those soles and came out with the Triple Threat that have replaceable Bar Cleats on a Vibram sole. It weighs 3X as much. I also found out that for some reason they slipped more.

So I went to switching out from the stock non-studded Kling-On soles for long hike-ins to the stock non-studded felt for wading. There are *three* problems. *I need to have somewhere to put the extra soles that wouldn't get the rest of my gear muddy or wet (my tactical sling pack has a water bladder pocket that I use for that),* I have to take the boots off to change soles (takes too much time), and non-studded felt still slips on real snotty rocks.

So I purchased another pair of studded Kling-On soles for wading and hiking. In two trips to a particular river 1 week apart, a treacherous section that is always in shade in (non-studded) felt was very slippery. The following week in studded King-On soles I stuck like glue. The studded Kling-On soles are relatively cheap; about the same price as the felt replacement soles I researched for the other thread and lightweight so now I'm using them for hike-ins too.
 
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SquatchinSince86

Active Member
I should mention in the interest of a fair review. The normal kling-on soles are garbage and probably dangerous. I don't understand why they are the default other than getting the boot under a certain price point. Too me you probably loose more business through attrition when people don't buy again or just don't survive their first dunking.
 

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