NFR Tips and tricks for camp fires in the wet forest of NW WA?

Jiminsandiego

Active Member
Thanks for all the input folks. Definitely uping my fire making game. Fatwood (from old growth stumps that were logged long ago) is truly amazing. I've done enough online research to know that what I have found around my home is top grade stuff. Solid, translucent "sticks" of almost pure "resin". The instant it touches a flame it's burning like crazy and keeps burning. With my (folding) saw, hatchet and (top of the line) ferro rod, making a fire in wet woods seems very doable, especially if fat wood and squaw wood can be found.
 
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Jiminsandiego

Active Member
Resurrecting an old thread. I was out plinking with my .22 rifle south of the Skagit river a couple of days ago. Melting snow on the ground and everything soaking wet. With my newfound knowledge, the abundance of nearby fat wood was obvious. With my folding saw and knife, I collecting about ten pounds of fat wood easily. Using a small pile of magnesium shavings (bought on Amazon) and a ferro rod to ignite it, I had a roaring fire, literarily, instantly. This was in heavy wind with rain. No paper, no matches, no lighter, no tinder, no kindling, no "fire starters".... Magnesium shavings plus ferro rod, plus fat wood equals fire. The phrase "knowledge is power" had never seemed so poignant as I warmed myself over that fire.
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
Fire Ribbon (REI)
Indian fires (small, so get close) burn less wood.
Wood surfaces close to each other, but with room for air circulation.
 

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
Resurrecting an old thread. I was out plinking with my .22 rifle south of the Skagit river a couple of days ago. Melting snow on the ground and everything soaking wet. With my newfound knowledge, the abundance of nearby fat wood was obvious. With my folding saw and knife, I collecting about ten pounds of fat wood easily. Using a small pile of magnesium shavings (bought on Amazon) and a ferro rod to ignite it, I had a roaring fire, literarily, instantly. This was in heavy wind with rain. No paper, no matches, no lighter, no tinder, no kindling, no "fire starters".... Magnesium shavings plus ferro rod, plus fat wood equals fire. The phrase "knowledge is power" had never seemed so poignant as I warmed myself over that fire.


What the he'll is fat wood.
 

Squamishpoacher

Active Member
I never go into the bush without my favourite folding pocket knife.
One side folds out a blade, saw, screwdriver, bottle opener, awl, flint and steel, compass, ruler, scissors, toothpick, tweezers, spoon, fork and magnifying glass. And the other side folds out a 3 room log cabin and 5 cords of dry firewood.
 

hookedonthefly

Active Member
Gasoline...:) . E
I never go into the bush without my favourite folding pocket knife.
One side folds out a blade, saw, screwdriver, bottle opener, awl, flint and steel, compass, ruler, scissors, toothpick, tweezers, spoon, fork and magnifying glass. And the other side folds out a 3 room log cabin and 5 cords of dry firewood.
It’s amazing what you can take down the river in a 14’ Maravia raft...we usually rolled with 14 cord and a pallet of Rainier (it was actually 1650 tall boy Rainiers but whose counting). Ed
* Edit - Just tryin’ to survive out here in the wilderness.
 
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TDub

Active Member
Try the upside down fire. There are many advantages to using this in the PNW. Check out this video, but there are many more in youtube.
 
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