New OP rules

Drifting man Grann

Active Member

Steve Saville

WFF Supporter
IMHO, it is a step in the right direction with all but a couple of aspects. First, that would be the "fishing from a boat" portion. There is a problem with that in that now we will see the banks degrading, trails along the river everywhere, trails through the woods, everywhere, ad hoc parking spots all along the river, and more and more. It may reduce the number of fishermen at first but eventually most will be back. All you have to do is look at Alaska's rivers. The banks have been so devastated that several have metal walkways along the banks to compensate for the loss of bank integrity. Even then, the guys step off the walkways and move down the banks to get "first shot" at the fish. Of course they aren't supposed to do that but it's done regardless. Then there is more loss of banks and so on and so on. I also don't think that the emergency regulations take into account the economic impact that the changes will have on communities like Forks. Those folks are probably ready to revolt. The emergency regs have to take into account all aspects. I've fished the Hoh and other rivers from a boat and done very well but always release the fish and along the float there are areas that would otherwise be inaccessible. That may be a good thing from the environment standpoint but I can imagine it won't take long until fishermen find a way to get there. Again, all IMHO.
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
I posted this in the main forum, but I thought it probably worthy of posting here.

NEWS RELEASE

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Dec. 10, 2020

Contact: Commission office, [email protected], 360-902-2267

Commission’s Fish Committee to hold meeting to discuss coastal steelhead conservation and fishing regulations

OLYMPIA – The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission’s Fish Committee will hold a public meeting on Friday, Dec. 11, to discuss recently announced coastal steelhead regulation changes and hear public comment.

Fish Program staff with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will provide the Fish Committee a briefing on coastal steelhead, including long-term trends, 2020-21 forecast, management actions to meet conservation objectives, and fishing opportunity.

WDFW on Tuesday announced upcoming coast-wide changes to sportfishing regulations in an effort to conserve wild steelhead as several coastal rivers are expected to again come in below escapement goals. The meeting is intended to provide the committee with an overview and background for these rules, which go into effect on Dec. 14.

The committee, which is made up of four members of the nine-member Commission, will also hear public comment during the meeting. No decisions will be made at the meeting.

The meeting will take place from 1-3 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 11. To support COVID-19 social distancing guidelines, the meeting will be available to the public to watch or listen through the webinar or conference call. For more information and to view an agenda, visit wdfw.wa.gov/about/commission/meetings. The meeting will also be recorded and posted online so people can also watch the meeting afterwards at their convenience.

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is a panel appointed by the governor that sets policy for the WDFW. WDFW is the primary state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish and wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities.

Individuals who need to receive this information in an alternative format, language, or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact the Title VI/ADA Compliance Coordinator by phone at 360-902-2349, TTY (711), or email ([email protected]).
 

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
I posted this in the main forum, but I thought it probably worthy of posting here.

NEWS RELEASE

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Dec. 10, 2020

Contact: Commission office, [email protected], 360-902-2267

Commission’s Fish Committee to hold meeting to discuss coastal steelhead conservation and fishing regulations

OLYMPIA – The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission’s Fish Committee will hold a public meeting on Friday, Dec. 11, to discuss recently announced coastal steelhead regulation changes and hear public comment.

Fish Program staff with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will provide the Fish Committee a briefing on coastal steelhead, including long-term trends, 2020-21 forecast, management actions to meet conservation objectives, and fishing opportunity.

WDFW on Tuesday announced upcoming coast-wide changes to sportfishing regulations in an effort to conserve wild steelhead as several coastal rivers are expected to again come in below escapement goals. The meeting is intended to provide the committee with an overview and background for these rules, which go into effect on Dec. 14.

The committee, which is made up of four members of the nine-member Commission, will also hear public comment during the meeting. No decisions will be made at the meeting.

The meeting will take place from 1-3 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 11. To support COVID-19 social distancing guidelines, the meeting will be available to the public to watch or listen through the webinar or conference call. For more information and to view an agenda, visit wdfw.wa.gov/about/commission/meetings. The meeting will also be recorded and posted online so people can also watch the meeting afterwards at their convenience.

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is a panel appointed by the governor that sets policy for the WDFW. WDFW is the primary state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish and wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities.

Individuals who need to receive this information in an alternative format, language, or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact the Title VI/ADA Compliance Coordinator by phone at 360-902-2349, TTY (711), or email ([email protected]).
Well i hope the guides give them an earful on this last minute decision. WDFW has known about the problem for a long time and probably knew what they were going to do this year but let the folks who depend on guiding to get all lined up with clients only to pull the rug out under them. Sucks.
 

JonT

Active Member
Well i hope the guides give them an earful on this last minute decision. WDFW has known about the problem for a long time and probably knew what they were going to do this year but let the folks who depend on guiding to get all lined up with clients only to pull the rug out under them. Sucks.
Maybe it's time we rethink exploiting ESA listed fish for money. And I mean that on every level.
 

Albula

swollen member
Well i hope the guides give them an earful on this last minute decision. WDFW has known about the problem for a long time and probably knew what they were going to do this year but let the folks who depend on guiding to get all lined up with clients only to pull the rug out under them. Sucks.
Any business owner/guide who refused to recognize and acknowledge the probability that restrictions would eventually be the chosen alternative to the former status quo has not been doing his homework.
 

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
Any business owner/guide who refused to recognize and acknowledge the probability that restrictions would eventually be the chosen alternative to the former status quo has not been doing his homework.
That does not get WDFW off the hook. Last second BS decision is just another crap decision by WDFW that doesn’t care about who they are supposed to be serving.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
They are not esa listed.
Perhaps wise fisheries scientists (@Smalma, @Salmo_g, @BDD, @anyothers) could weigh in here and explain the process of a species becoming listed as endangered. This thread indicates some (many?) OP rivers aren't meeting escapement requirements (goal or requirement?). I don't know if these rivers that aren't meeting "escapement" requirements is fact or impression or legend but it does seem that steelhead numbers are severely depleted and I'm ignorantly leaning towards "it's a fact". Some posters have used the term "extirpated" or "nearly extinct". I don't think there's much debate that steelhead numbers are way down, "on the brink".

Everyone seems to blame WDFW for so many of our fisheries problems (at times, me too: guilty as charged). I don't think a decision to list a species as endangered comes down to WDFW since ESA is a federal law (NMFS? USFWS?).

I'm clueless as to what happens to tribal fisheries of ESA listed fish, especially on tribal land. All of us do know what ESA listings mean to sport angling.
 

Charles Sullivan

Active Member
That does not get WDFW off the hook. Last second BS decision is just another crap decision by WDFW that doesn’t care about who they are supposed to be serving.
I don't fault WDFW. The guides are getting laid off by the rivers not by WDFW. WDFW, the river and the state owe nothing to the guides. They make their living by monetizing a public resource for their own gain. The resource and the resource managers don't owe them a thing.

Go Sox,
cds
 

burninater

Burninating the rivers!
Any thoughts why they didn't go straight catch and release only? Clearly this looks targeted at reducing guided fishing.
I also agree that the conversation about ESA is more about tribal netting and commercial fishing. This regulation seems more about trying to slow the bleeding, but if nothing else is done will inevitably lead to more drastic measures. Perhaps its just to drive more public awareness? Beats me. ESA is definitely the nuclear option, but maybe the only one....
 

Charles Sullivan

Active Member
Any thoughts why they didn't go straight catch and release only? Clearly this looks targeted at reducing guided fishing.
I also agree that the conversation about ESA is more about tribal netting and commercial fishing. This regulation seems more about trying to slow the bleeding, but if nothing else is done will inevitably lead to more drastic measures. Perhaps its just to drive more public awareness? Beats me. ESA is definitely the nuclear option, but maybe the only one....
It is C&R for wild fish.

Go Sox,
cds
 

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