NFR Garden Thread 2021

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
Question about blueberries: In late June my 2 blueberry plants were coming on strong, with berries ripening earlier than usual. So I picked 1 1/2 quarts and predicted that I'd have a peak production picking in a week or less. And then the ripening just stalled, a good 3 weeks, even though the weather has continued warm to hot. Finally picked another quart and a half day before yesterday, with a lot of what I picked being a tad less than fully ripe. Don't know when, if ever, the remainder of the crop will ripen. Seems like mid-July is generally peak for blueberries.

After reading about the heat wave devastating raspberry and blueberry crops in the PNW, it got me wondering if that late June heat screwed with my blueberry plants too. One of the bushes still has 2 or 3 quarts of berries on it - if they ever ripen.

What sayeth the green thumb gurus?
I don't have an answer, but my berries are behaving similarly.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
I’m no culinary expert, far from it but nice to be able to grab some things you grow to put stuff together.
My big Beefsteak tomatoes aren’t quite ripe yet, so a bit heavy on the cheese and light on the tomatoes. The neighbor and I enjoyed it
Garlic bread is in the oven to bat mop up.
Might want to incorporate some meat into this the next go round, I was thinking a nice salami but I’m open to suggestions.
SF



2DA5A466-61B6-4B35-BA5E-4B5B0F83797F.jpeg
 

Smalma

Active Member
This year in grandmother's blueberry patch the yield has been only fair. The early varieties were a complete bust, the mid-season had a good crop, and the late varieties were so-so. An observation 3 of the bushes were in pots while the rest (11 bushes) are in the ground with a mulch ground cover out to the drip line. Most years the yield in the potted plant matches that of those in the ground but not this year. Wonder if we were able to keep the soil moisture at a more consistent level with the those in the ground/mulched providing that more consistent yield.

The weather during the spring during the bloom has a big impact on the resulting yield which largely explains the year to year variation in yield between the 3 types (early/mid/late season). While I don't often see my mason bees on the blueberries since providing mason bee nesting boxes our yield has been more consistent. That said berries provided to the neighbors, wife's co-workers, and family and have nearly 4 gallons in the freezer with maybe another gallon on the bushes - a decent blueberry year.

The heat dome had a big impact on my raspberries getting maybe only about 1/2 of the expected yield with the mid season (peak crop) taking the largest hit. The strawberries and blueberries seemed to get through the heat OK. With lots of water the fruit trees are doing well with the Asian pears loaded (thinned then severely), regular pear, and apple load and looking forward to our first peaches (3 year old tree has about 40 peaches). In the main garden my peas and onions have done poorly, the lettuce, swiss char, beets and carrots produced a good crop and the squashes, beans and corn (9,5 feet tall and forming ears) doing well. First BLTs on the menu tonight with the first ":beef steak" tomato ripe.

Our large flower beds while suffering some loses during the heat wave are generally doing well with the wife getting many compliments from the neighbors and those whose walks take them through the neighborhood. A challenging gardening year (aren't they all) on the whole at least an average year and as long as I don't look too closely to the water bill a success!

Curt
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
Question about blueberries: In late June my 2 blueberry plants were coming on strong, with berries ripening earlier than usual. So I picked 1 1/2 quarts and predicted that I'd have a peak production picking in a week or less. And then the ripening just stalled, a good 3 weeks, even though the weather has continued warm to hot. Finally picked another quart and a half day before yesterday, with a lot of what I picked being a tad less than fully ripe. Don't know when, if ever, the remainder of the crop will ripen. Seems like mid-July is generally peak for blueberries.

After reading about the heat wave devastating raspberry and blueberry crops in the PNW, it got me wondering if that late June heat screwed with my blueberry plants too. One of the bushes still has 2 or 3 quarts of berries on it - if they ever ripen.

What sayeth the green thumb gurus?

When high temperatures coincide with fruiting, water and carbohydrates are diverted from the fruit to supply leaves and other vegetative components of the plant, resulting in small or shriveled berries, hastened fruit ripening, and a reduction in fruit quality and storage.
At the cellular level, high temperatures disrupt the thermal stability of membranes and proteins, causing ion leakage and inhibition of physiological processes associated with fruit development.
Unlike leaves that cool via transpiration, blueberries have very few stomata on their surface and, therefore, do not have an effective means of cooling
:)

Shorter version...
Northern highbush blueberry varieties don't like a lot of heat.


All you'd ever want to know in the link.
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
I’m no culinary expert, far from it but nice to be able to grab some things you grow to put stuff together.
My big Beefsteak tomatoes aren’t quite ripe yet, so a bit heavy on the cheese and light on the tomatoes. The neighbor and I enjoyed it
Garlic bread is in the oven to bat mop up.
Might want to incorporate some meat into this the next go round, I was thinking a nice salami but I’m open to suggestions.
SF



View attachment 290592
We like to hit up a good deli and stock up on the cured meats to go with tomato season.
Sopresatta, Finocchiona, Coppa and Bresaola are the ones we usually get.
Any of the salami types are good with me...we like to have 5-6 different types so just add a few slices of each to the Caprese.

Haggens in Woodinville has a good charcuterie counter with a pretty good selection of decent cured meats...I can drop a couple hundred easy in there, then cut up the full sausages into smaller pieces and vac seal, then just keep in the fridge.
With tomato season just around the corner I need to make a trip over there, and stock up on Chianti and Brunello too...
Some of the best eats of the year are coming up soon.
:)
 

Salmo_g

WFF Supporter
Speaking of tomatoes, I think I'm coming to an understanding about growing them here. My Sungolds are off the charts productive this year. I tried Muskovich for a slicer this time around - not many fruits on the vines, but the couple that have ripened thus far are delicious.

Because our PS climate is generally considered to suck for tomato growing, I selected a spot on the south side of my house to provide some reflected heat for tomatoes. To further nurture tomato ripening, I built a cold frame that amounts to a mini-greenhouse about the size of a generous outhouse. I covered the sides with some special "greenhouse" grade plastic visqueen. For a roof I used a corrogated lexan or acrylic plastic sheeting. I now realize I encourage too much heat for tomatoes when we get our atypically seriously hot weather. I failed to build in ventilation to prevent it from getting too damn hot. How do I know this, aside from the shriveled leaves on the plants, that I used to think was some kind of pest or tomato disease? I know because the clear plastic roofing has turned dark brown and black from burning in the heat! Yeah, I guess it can get too hot, even for heat loving tomato plants. I'll tear this roof off at the end of this season and build a new one on hinges that can tilt up to let heated air escape. Clearly, I've got a ways to go before I earn my green thumb for gardening, but I'm getting steadily closer.
 

Gary Knowels

Active Member
We like to hit up a good deli and stock up on the cured meats to go with tomato season.
Sopresatta, Finocchiona, Coppa and Bresaola are the ones we usually get.
Any of the salami types are good with me...we like to have 5-6 different types so just add a few slices of each to the Caprese.

Haggens in Woodinville has a good charcuterie counter with a pretty good selection of decent cured meats...I can drop a couple hundred easy in there, then cut up the full sausages into smaller pieces and vac seal, then just keep in the fridge.
With tomato season just around the corner I need to make a trip over there, and stock up on Chianti and Brunello too...
Some of the best eats of the year are coming up soon.
:)
Central Market in shoreline is great for that too!
 

Gary Knowels

Active Member
We like to hit up a good deli and stock up on the cured meats to go with tomato season.
Sopresatta, Finocchiona, Coppa and Bresaola are the ones we usually get.
Any of the salami types are good with me...we like to have 5-6 different types so just add a few slices of each to the Caprese.

Haggens in Woodinville has a good charcuterie counter with a pretty good selection of decent cured meats...I can drop a couple hundred easy in there, then cut up the full sausages into smaller pieces and vac seal, then just keep in the fridge.
With tomato season just around the corner I need to make a trip over there, and stock up on Chianti and Brunello too...
Some of the best eats of the year are coming up soon.
:)
Also if you are passing through Tacoma, hit me up I'll I'll give you a bottle of my favorite wine to go with food of that type Sangue di Giuda. Slightly sparkling red wine on the sweeter end.
 

Dr. Magill

Active Member
Speaking of tomatoes, I think I'm coming to an understanding about growing them here. My Sungolds are off the charts productive this year. I tried Muskovich for a slicer this time around - not many fruits on the vines, but the couple that have ripened thus far are delicious.

Because our PS climate is generally considered to suck for tomato growing, I selected a spot on the south side of my house to provide some reflected heat for tomatoes. To further nurture tomato ripening, I built a cold frame that amounts to a mini-greenhouse about the size of a generous outhouse. I covered the sides with some special "greenhouse" grade plastic visqueen. For a roof I used a corrogated lexan or acrylic plastic sheeting. I now realize I encourage too much heat for tomatoes when we get our atypically seriously hot weather. I failed to build in ventilation to prevent it from getting too damn hot. How do I know this, aside from the shriveled leaves on the plants, that I used to think was some kind of pest or tomato disease? I know because the clear plastic roofing has turned dark brown and black from burning in the heat! Yeah, I guess it can get too hot, even for heat loving tomato plants. I'll tear this roof off at the end of this season and build a new one on hinges that can tilt up to let heated air escape. Clearly, I've got a ways to go before I earn my green thumb for gardening, but I'm getting steadily closer.
Shade cloth is your friend
Horticultural grade
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I’m no culinary expert, far from it but nice to be able to grab some things you grow to put stuff together.
My big Beefsteak tomatoes aren’t quite ripe yet, so a bit heavy on the cheese and light on the tomatoes. The neighbor and I enjoyed it
Garlic bread is in the oven to bat mop up.
Might want to incorporate some meat into this the next go round, I was thinking a nice salami but I’m open to suggestions.
SF



View attachment 290592
I chopped vine ripened Roma's tonight and fresh basil, drizzled olive oil on fresh herb bread, toasted it and then served that as a side with the chopped garden gooness - slow cooked ribs. Bruchetta is one of our favorites but we love caprese too (where can we get fresh mozzarela around here? ;-)). Looks good to me, Brian!
 

Thomas Mitchell

corvus ossifragus
WFF Supporter
Also if you are passing through Tacoma, hit me up I'll I'll give you a bottle of my favorite wine to go with food of that type Sangue di Giuda. Slightly sparkling red wine on the sweeter end.
"Blood of Judas" love that stuff. Bought some on accident once and went back for a couple cases afterwards. Wife hates it but that means more for me and my sweet tooth.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
I chopped vine ripened Roma's tonight and fresh basil, drizzled olive oil on fresh herb bread, toasted it and then served that as a side with the chopped garden gooness - slow cooked ribs. Bruchetta is one of our favorites but we love caprese too (where can we get fresh mozzarela around here? ;-)). Looks good to me, Brian!

Did it again tonight since so many tomatoes are ripening. Added some salami and sprinkled some feta on it as well.
Would I get demerits from Martha Stewart for putting the salami on top rather then under the mozzarella? :D
SF

2D4CCDCD-D776-4F05-AB1B-D8B596A6926A.jpeg
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top