Albacore Roll Call 2021

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
Oh look, fish on, you can puke after!
haha! On my first tuna trip back in 2009, I (along with most of the other guys on the boat) drank a touch too much the previous evening. Barely held it together on the bumpy ride out. I hooked my first fish, landed it and immediately handed the rod off to someone and chummed the water...after getting back to port, Capt. Chuck told us, "yeah, that's about as gnarly of an ocean that I'll take folks out in"....wow, fuckin' thanks!
 

Nick Clayton

WFF Supporter
@Nick Clayton Whats size are the chovies that you guys pick up?


Eh there is no real standard size. The people who sell the bait go out with a big boat and net them up, so it just depends on what they catch. It changes fairly often as they cycle through their bait pens. Ive seen days where we get a million 2 inchers in a scoop, and Ive seen days where they are ginormous. On average Id say 3-5"
 

SilverFly

Active Member
For tuna, I’m going with the “tie as many different flies as I can think of” method. It assuages my ADD and since I don’t really know what I’m doing my plan is to throw a bunch of stuff at the tuna and see what sticks them.

We should start an ADD tuna fly tying club... or maybe support group ;).

Nothing wrong with tying up a bunch of random shit (your flies are definitely NOT shit) to see what works. When I first started doing this it took me a few trips before I finally started catching them on retrieved flies (no problem trolling). Part of that was my first instinct to head to the bow on a bait stop to cast at boiling fish. Invariably, the guys fishing in back where the chum was being thrown didn't have problems hooking up.

Still, it drove me (more) nuts that chucking flies into the midst of boiling fish didn't result in instantaneous hookups. That fired my ADD and sent me down the path of tying as realistic anchovy imitations as I could... and maybe went a little too far down that rabbit hole :rolleyes: . Anyway, the point I'm trying to get at is that, as Nick has pointed out, albacore are "crazy" in what they will eat or reject on a given day.

Case in point: Last year my tried-and-true anchovy patterns just weren't getting it done. At the same time, tuna first timer WFF members were teaching me some things by spanking them on flies I first thought were too gaudy and unrealistic (but otherwise great looking flies). Colors like chartreuse, purple, and black - WTF?!

My boxes were full of different flies, squid, anchovy, saury, mackerel, even krill, but all in natural colors. Fortunately it was realism that got me back in the game. We saw lots of skinny little sauries swimming around the boat, so I downsized to the saury patterns, and got right back in the game.

The takeaway I got from those trips was you had to either match the hatch precisely, OR use something completely different. Almost like switching to an attractor pattern in the middle of a crazy-picky hatch.

So yeah, tying a bunch of different stuff to see "what sticks" is a solid strategy for this fishery. Let your ADD run wild brother!
 
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Kfish

WFF Supporter
We should start an ADD tuna fly tying club... or maybe support group ;).

Nothing wrong with tying up a bunch of random shit (your flies are definitely NOT shit) to see what works. When I first started doing this it took me a few trips before I finally started catching them on retrieved flies (no problem trolling). Part of that was my first instinct to head to the bow on a bait stop to cast at boiling fish. Invariably, the guys fishing in back where the chum was being thrown didn't have problems hooking up.

Still, it drove me (more) nuts that chucking flies into the midst of boiling fish didn't result in instantaneous hookups. That fired my ADD and sent me down the path of tying as realistic anchovy imitations as I could... and maybe went a little too far down that rabbit hole :rolleyes: . Anyway, the point I'm trying to get at is that, as Nick has pointed out, albacore are "crazy" in what they will eat or reject on a given day.

Case in point: Last year my tried-and-true anchovy patterns just weren't getting it done. At the same time, tuna first timer WFF members were teaching me some things by spanking them on flies I first thought were too gaudy and unrealistic (but otherwise great looking flies). Colors like chartreuse, purple, and black - WTF?!

My boxes were full of different flies, squid, anchovy, saury, mackerel, even krill, but all in natural colors. Fortunately it was realism that got me back in the game. We saw lots of skinny little sauries swimming around the boat, so I downsized to the saury patterns, and got right back in the game.

The takeaway I got from those trips was you had to either match the hatch precisely, OR use something completely different. Almost like switching to an attractor pattern in the middle of a crazy-picky hatch.

So yeah, tying a bunch of different stuff to see "what sticks" is a solid strategy for this fishery. Let your ADD run wild brother!
Would it be a good idea then for everyone in the boat to throw a variety of different flies to see what gets hit so everyone else can change to that pattern/color?
 

SilverFly

Active Member
Would it be a good idea then for everyone in the boat to throw a variety of different flies to see what gets hit so everyone else can change to that pattern/color?
Makes sense to me. Especially if they are being picky. One reason I think trolling flies is OK, is to see what they might want that day. Of course, there's a bit of apples/oranges since the raw speed of trolling seems to trigger a chase response, That said, profile and color does seem to matter on the troll so I think it can help picking the first fly.

Sounds like we should just do an albacore swap so that we can have a huge variety of flies across all the boats!

I'm down... if somebody else wants to run it, and the deadline isn't anytime soon.
 
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SilverFly

Active Member
haha! On my first tuna trip back in 2009, I (along with most of the other guys on the boat) drank a touch too much the previous evening. Barely held it together on the bumpy ride out. I hooked my first fish, landed it and immediately handed the rod off to someone and chummed the water...after getting back to port, Capt. Chuck told us, "yeah, that's about as gnarly of an ocean that I'll take folks out in"....wow, fuckin' thanks!

Chuck's definition of gnarly must have changed. Think it was a year later we had a super-bumpy ride out in degrading conditions. When we finally started fishing, we spent all of 20 minutes looking UP at our flies waking down the face of the waves behind us, before he called it. Apparently 14' combined seas was his gnarly limit. Myself, my 19yo son, and Chuck were the only ones who weren't turning green and spewing.
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
We should start an ADD tuna fly tying club... or maybe support group ;).

Nothing wrong with tying up a bunch of random shit (your flies are definitely NOT shit) to see what works. When I first started doing this it took me a few trips before I finally started catching them on retrieved flies (no problem trolling). Part of that was my first instinct to head to the bow on a bait stop to cast at boiling fish. Invariably, the guys fishing in back where the chum was being thrown didn't have problems hooking up.

Still, it drove me (more) nuts that chucking flies into the midst of boiling fish didn't result in instantaneous hookups. That fired my ADD and sent me down the path of tying as realistic anchovy imitations as I could... and maybe went a little too far down that rabbit hole :rolleyes: . Anyway, the point I'm trying to get at is that, as Nick has pointed out, albacore are "crazy" in what they will eat or reject on a given day.

Case in point: Last year my tried-and-true anchovy patterns just weren't getting it done. At the same time, tuna first timer WFF members were teaching me some things by spanking them on flies I first thought were too gaudy and unrealistic (but otherwise great looking flies). Colors like chartreuse, purple, and black - WTF?!

My boxes were full of different flies, squid, anchovy, saury, mackerel, even krill, but all in natural colors. Fortunately it was realism that got me back in the game. We saw lots of skinny little sauries swimming around the boat, so I downsized to the saury patterns, and got right back in the game.

The takeaway I got from those trips was you had to either match the hatch precisely, OR use something completely different. Almost like switching to an attractor pattern in the middle of a crazy-picky hatch.

So yeah, tying a bunch of different stuff to see "what sticks" is a solid strategy for this fishery. Let your ADD run wild brother!

This makes me feel a little better about my ADD musky fly tying....hahaha!
 

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