Albacore Roll Call 2021

Nick Clayton

WFF Supporter
Braided loops are great if you're confident installing them. I had a couple fail on me years ago when I was first learning how to do em.

A chunk of heavy mono nail knotted to the fly line with a loop at the other end for leader attachment is solid, or Jake's suggestion works fine too.

All the lines I'm currently using have factory loops that have held up very well for me.
 

Bagman

Active Member
Braided loops are great if you're confident installing them. I had a couple fail on me years ago when I was first learning how to do em.

A chunk of heavy mono nail knotted to the fly line with a loop at the other end for leader attachment is solid, or Jake's suggestion works fine too.

All the lines I'm currently using have factory loops that have held up very well for me.
You should not use super glue because it is not good at flexing it wants to crack which cracks the coating on the fly line which can cut through the coating pulling the loop off along with the coating. I always use aqua seal over my 8-10 wraps of 8/10 wt mono on my needle knot that I really pull tight. While I do not have nearly the amount of time Nick has on the water I got my information out of Bluewater Fly Fishing Author Tray Combs in his book he has 7 other ways to connect backing/leaders to fly line, but says he prefers the braided mono. He says he has landed fish over 100 pounds with a 50lb mono loop. That’s good enough for me.
 

thatguyryry

Active Member
I must suck at nail knots because I lost a 30 ft section of t14 to the bottom this weekend. Though the nail knotted mono section did not break nor the 4' 30 lb leader.
 

pbunbury

Tights Lines
I must suck at nail knots because I lost a 30 ft section of t14 to the bottom this weekend. Though the nail knotted mono section did not break nor the 4' 30 lb leader.
30ft of t-14? How deep were you trying to get? You can't really effectively fly fish much deeper than 50 ft. Pro tip, get an integrated line with a built in sink tip, absolutely worth it. I personally use Cortland Compact Sink type 6 or 9 there's also the Rio Outbound and Airflo makes a depthfinder line too, you can get anything for a 5 weight on up to a 16. Easy to cast and you don't have to deal with said problem.

In terms of backing knots, double Bimini Twist is the way to go then loop to loop. I've landed multiple fish over 100 lbs on it (GT's, Yellowfin Tuna, and Wahoo), never fails. If you're concerned with the factory loop, cut it and double the fly line over itself get some mono and synch it up with tight wraps and finish with hitches, then aqua seal it and wala, you've made your own loop. I have not personally had any issues with factory loops failing on big fish.
 
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NRC

WFF Supporter
30ft of t-14? How deep were you trying to get? You can't really effectively fly fish much deeper than 50 ft. Pro tip, get an integrated line with a built in sink tip, absolutely worth it. I personally use Cortland Compact Sink type 6 or 9 there's also the Rio Outbound and Airflo makes a depthfinder line too, you can get anything for a 5 weight on up to a 16. Easy to cast and you don't have to deal with said problem.

In terms of backing knots, double Bimini Twist is the way to go then loop to loop. I've landed multiple fish over 100 lbs on it (GT's, Yellowfin Tuna, and Wahoo), never fails. If you're concerned with the factory loop, cut it and double the fly line over itself get some mono and synch it up with tight wraps and finish with hitches, then aqua seal it and wala, you've made your own loop. I have not personally had any issues with factory loops failing on big fish.
I think people around here fly fish quite a bit deeper than 50’ for lingcod.
 

pbunbury

Tights Lines
I think people around here fly fish quite a bit deeper than 50’ for lingcod.
I’ve been chasing Lings on the fly in Puget Sound and the straits since 2010. I used to get a lot of strange looks out in Sekiu and Neah Bay because all we fish is fly rods but we do very well, typically better than most other boats when we get back to the dock. I’ve never had to go deeper than 50. If you know, you know. And like I said, it’s hard to effectively fish much deeper 50 ft, (didn’t say it can’t be done, but with our tides and currents, even at slack tide it can be difficult to actually get down real deep) and why do it if you don’t need to? I’ve caught a ling on the fly that I sight casted to in less than 10 ft of water. 6D8015FD-5D58-43E1-91A1-F62B33D3F742.jpeg
 

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NRC

WFF Supporter
I’ve been chasing Lings on the fly in Puget Sound and the straits since 2010. I used to get a lot of strange looks out in Sekiu and Neah Bay because all we fish is fly rods but we do very well, typically better than most other boats when we get back to the dock. I’ve never had to go deeper than 50. If you know, you know. And like I said, it’s hard to effectively fish much deeper 50 ft, (didn’t say it can’t be done) and why do it if you don’t need to? I’ve caught a ling on the fly that I sight casted to in less than 10 ft of water. View attachment 281575
I won’t believe you until you take me out on your boat and prove it to me!
 

pbunbury

Tights Lines
I won’t believe you until you take me out on your boat and prove it to me!
Haha, I like your style and you never know. Unfortunately Lingcod on the fly tend to have a Steelhead like vibe in that there isn’t an abundance of big fish in good fly water. I hold my spots pretty tight to the vest.
 

thatguyryry

Active Member
Moat of the places I was fishing was about 50 to 75 ft. I was also testing it out to see if I could use that for tuna this summer.
30ft of t-14? How deep were you trying to get? You can't really effectively fly fish much deeper than 50 ft. Pro tip, get an integrated line with a built in sink tip, absolutely worth it. I personally use Cortland Compact Sink type 6 or 9 there's also the Rio Outbound and Airflo makes a depthfinder line too, you can get anything for a 5 weight on up to a 16. Easy to cast and you don't have to deal with said problem.

In terms of backing knots, double Bimini Twist is the way to go then loop to loop. I've landed multiple fish over 100 lbs on it (GT's, Yellowfin Tuna, and Wahoo), never fails. If you're concerned with the factory loop, cut it and double the fly line over itself get some mono and synch it up with tight wraps and finish with hitches, then aqua seal it and wala, you've made your own loop. I have not personally had any issues with factory loops failing on big fish.
 

Nick Clayton

WFF Supporter
For fishing 50' or less I definitely prefer an integrated line. And a guy can certainly catch plenty of fish in that depth.

However it's definitely possible to fish deeper than that, and when doing so I much prefer a setup of T14-T20. When fishing that deep I very rarely am stripping the head all the way back in. I like to cast out, let it sink nearly vertical, then retrieve back to about the loop at the head, then stack mend to get it back down. In that case the loop to loop doesn't bother me. I also like that setup more for open water salmon fishing. It sinks fast enough to let me get plenty deep when wanted, but also sinks fast enough that I can strip as fast as I want and keep the fly down. No integrated line sinks as fast as that sort of setup, and for many situations that's what I prefer.

Ultimately it comes down to your preferred style of fishing. I highly enjoy fishing as deep as possible. Most of my ling fishing has been 50-100' and for that depth I very much prefer a head of T whatever. Currents and such definitely come into play, but good boat control can counter act that for the most part.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
For fishing 50' or less I definitely prefer an integrated line. And a guy can certainly catch plenty of fish in that depth.

However it's definitely possible to fish deeper than that, and when doing so I much prefer a setup of T14-T20. When fishing that deep I very rarely am stripping the head all the way back in. I like to cast out, let it sink nearly vertical, then retrieve back to about the loop at the head, then stack mend to get it back down. In that case the loop to loop doesn't bother me. I also like that setup more for open water salmon fishing. It sinks fast enough to let me get plenty deep when wanted, but also sinks fast enough that I can strip as fast as I want and keep the fly down. No integrated line sinks as fast as that sort of setup, and for many situations that's what I prefer.

Ultimately it comes down to your preferred style of fishing. I highly enjoy fishing as deep as possible. Most of my ling fishing has been 50-100' and for that depth I very much prefer a head of T whatever. Currents and such definitely come into play, but good boat control can counter act that for the most part.

I'm with ya Nick when it comes to digging putting a fly deep. Not everyone's cup of tea, but there's something mysteriously fascinating about waiting to feel a grab from Davy Jones locker.

I keep thinking I'll have time to revisit the stupid deep line project but keep getting side-tracked. From what I learned on the first try I think the way to go is using the same coatings, but stuffing different grades of T line into hollow braid (IIRC you mentioned this in the past). Probably 140# JB. Another benefit of the hollow braid is it would allow knotless ("wind on") leader connections.
 

Jake

veni, vidi, fishi
I'm with ya Nick when it comes to digging putting a fly deep. Not everyone's cup of tea, but there's something mysteriously fascinating about waiting to feel a grab from Davy Jones locker.

I keep thinking I'll have time to revisit the stupid deep line project but keep getting side-tracked. From what I learned on the first try I think the way to go is using the same coatings, but stuffing different grades of T line into hollow braid (IIRC you mentioned this in the past). Probably 140# JB. Another benefit of the hollow braid is it would allow knotless ("wind on") leader connections.
One way we did it as kids was to clip a 1970s sinking fly line into a downrigger, send it down, pop the line out of the downrigger clip, haul up the downrigger, leaving the fly down there, and fish for chinook or rockfish.

Worked well down as far as we cared to go. I think ~120’ was standard.
 
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Bagman

Active Member
Well I’m almost ready for the trip this coming albacore season. Got my primary reel that cost more then I could really afford so for my back up I had to cut way back on cost. My primary is on the right I’m going to wait tell next pay day to buy a fly line for it.
 

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thatguyryry

Active Member
So just picked up the custom cut outbound from Rio with the new slickcast. And we'll, it seems pretty slick! I'll probably keep the full 30 ft. I'll give a further report after fishing it next week.
 

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