Tying chironomids: wingbuds

dbk

Active Member
Noticed a lot of B.C guys tying mids' with wingbuds rather than simply using thread colors for the thorax.. not sure if it makes a pattern more effective but tied a few tonight.. not real sure the method or sequence for tying the buds in.. the material used to imitate the buds are turkey or goose biots.. if anyone has any experience tying mids with biot wingbuds it would be helpful to know how these are tied in.. 20210117_001014.jpg 20210117_001405.jpg
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Appreciate the responses.. that Trevor is an artist.. very much a work in progress but its an interesting concept for tying mids.. View attachment 268014
Very cool looking and I can see why the wingbuds silhouette adds to the fly and no doubt to its effectiveness. Not a facebook member so I'm unable to see how Trevor wraps this fly up.
 

tkww

Member
Very cool looking and I can see why the wingbuds silhouette adds to the fly and no doubt to its effectiveness. Not a facebook member so I'm unable to see how Trevor wraps this fly up.
I won't repost his pics but the gist is:

Tie in the points of the biots on the underside of the fly. Tie them in on their edge, so that the width is parallel to the shank (and you)--the opposite of say a prince nymph where you tie them in "flat." Do this as you're building up the body bulk with the thread. Finish bulking up the body to the bead--omit some bulk right behind the bead, as you'll need to to cover up the biot tie-downs later. Then winds up the ribbing(s). The biot points end up tied in at the 2nd (from the bead) of 6-8 ribbing wraps--like @dbk has done. Pull the biots up and around to the top third of the body mass*, tie them in/cut them off/cover them up, and that's the remaining thread bulk behind the bead.

*What I mean by "top third" is that he doesn't pull them all the way to the top of the shank, but they're more on top than just the side of the fly (more like dbk's first attempt).

The key seems to be getting the biots tied in on-edge so that they're ready to just fold over, which seems tricky to me. Also, probably choosing some portion of the biot other than the tip, as that doesn't have enough width to really stand out. Obviously would depend on the size of the fly, size of the biot, etc.

It's a great look, though I worry about durability, if prince nymphs are any indication. Resin/glue them? Anyway, done right, it gives a really nice tapered look that clearly hangs out from the body like the natural buds do.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I won't repost his pics but the gist is:

Tie in the points of the biots on the underside of the fly. Tie them in on their edge, so that the width is parallel to the shank (and you)--the opposite of say a prince nymph where you tie them in "flat." Do this as you're building up the body bulk with the thread. Finish bulking up the body to the bead--omit some bulk right behind the bead, as you'll need to to cover up the biot tie-downs later. Then winds up the ribbing(s). The biot points end up tied in at the 2nd (from the bead) of 6-8 ribbing wraps--like @dbk has done. Pull the biots up and around to the top third of the body mass*, tie them in/cut them off/cover them up, and that's the remaining thread bulk behind the bead.

*What I mean by "top third" is that he doesn't pull them all the way to the top of the shank, but they're more on top than just the side of the fly (more like dbk's first attempt).

The key seems to be getting the biots tied in on-edge so that they're ready to just fold over, which seems tricky to me. Also, probably choosing some portion of the biot other than the tip, as that doesn't have enough width to really stand out. Obviously would depend on the size of the fly, size of the biot, etc.

It's a great look, though I worry about durability, if prince nymphs are any indication. Resin/glue them? Anyway, done right, it gives a really nice tapered look that clearly hangs out from the body like the natural buds do.
Thanks for your explanation. I'll try to see if I can make this work. I do agree that goose biots are fragile and I can't tell from dbk's pictures but it almost looks as if there's UV or some time of adhesive on the "buds".

Merci'!
 

dbk

Active Member
Getting the buds to fold over and lay right is the trickiest part.. great explanation by tkww on how to do this but for me its been inconsistent at best to get the biots tied in correctly.. definitely need to cover tthe biots with UV resin..
 

troutpocket

Active Member
I agree they look great. There are other materials, like holo tinsel that are pretty easy to work with and also look good...but not the same. There is satisfaction in doing the extra work with a difficult material if that’s your goal.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Jeff - I think that the profile of the wingbuds should add something to their effectiveness, more so than tinsel hard against the thorax? Who knows, but I hear ya about catching us.
 

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