Ambushed on the Stillaguamish River

ianpadron

Active Member
Holy cow, this is flat out insane, but I think the saddest part is that it's not in the least bit surprising.

This state is slowly but surely turning into one giant breeding ground for unpunished criminal behavior.

Go to Seattle, risk getting punched in the face by a crackhead...try and escape the city to do a little fishing...and risk getting shot at or have your property destroyed by a bunch of backwoods inbreds.

I have literally never fished the Stilly, Sauk, Skagit, or N. Fork of the Sky without walking back to my vehicle figuring there was a decent chance my rig had windows busted out or was sitting on cinder blocks. The fact that that mindset seems to just be "part of the game" here in WA state is absolutely mind blowing to a fella like myself who grew up in the Midwest, where even the most down and out folks in society still have respect for others.

And as mentioned, no one (in terms of authorities) seems to give a flying F around here about these issues.

Hope they get a hold of these guys, and glad you and your hubby are ok, what an absolutely ridiculous experience to have to deal with.
 

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
my coworker owns the apartment building he lives in a few blocks off of 99 in Seattle. The horror stories he has are unreal and pretty much everyday thing. oh and it’s Heroin now not so much crack I guess. And the city supplies you with free needles & housing if you are sober enough to apply for it. Prostitution is legal, drugs legal, theft legal, driving under the influence legal, breaking & entering legal.
 

LilCutts

Semper Doodle
WFF Supporter
Fished at C Post on Friday with a friend. All clear. Only saw hikers and didn't hear any gunfire. Unfortunately I still came away with a huge rock-shaped bruise after I fell on my ass trying to wade across an area that my friend crossed just fine. The moral of this story is if you feel nervous about the water running too fast, JUST SAY NO and pick a better spot.
 

JamesRPL+

Active Member
my coworker owns the apartment building he lives in a few blocks off of 99 in Seattle. The horror stories he has are unreal and pretty much everyday thing. oh and it’s Heroin now not so much crack I guess. And the city supplies you with free needles & housing if you are sober enough to apply for it. Prostitution is legal, drugs legal, theft legal, driving under the influence legal, breaking & entering legal.
This may have a bit to do with our (our my ass ) choice in Governors. National Guard and some well charged fire hoses, clean it up?
 

LilCutts

Semper Doodle
WFF Supporter
Not to derail anything... but you don't really hear about politicians trying to fix this stuff either. Outside of outdoor forums where do you hear this shit? I don't know how to fix it, or if it's even fixable. But it really is anarchy once you get past the population centers. Very few police officers out there, response time is long for those who are... and enough lawless folk who don't give an F to add a huge element of risk to everything.

Unfortunately I think it's pretty much up to us. First of all keep reporting these incidents on FFF and file a police report as well as contacting the WDFW or whichever public lands management (Snohomish County Parks & Rec in this case).
@Zoomer sent some great advice to me via email, here's what she wrote:

I think if you re-read my original post you will find the chrono of the details there. While I am not pleased with the response (lack of) from Snohomish County Sherriff Office and Deputy Westick and Deputy Friestat. I did find more interest with Ranger Wheeler at Snohomish County Parks and Recreation. The Parks and Recreation own the land at C-Post in conjunction with DNR as part of the Oso Slide Memorial. I also was in contact with Officer Peters with WDFW but she is spread so thin that I doubt she can investigate much.

Anyways, thanks for getting the word out there. The more people know this is happening may save someone else from getting scared or injured. My worry is the guys might elevate their bullying and somebody WILL get hurt.

Here are some recommendations for Safety Tips I've compiled that I hope will be helpful to other anglers fishing on Public Lands. I am working with United Women on the Fly on a Safety Segment they hope to post later this month.

1. When departing on your fishing journey, make sure your gas tank is full, especially if you are going to a remote area. Check that your spare tire is full of air. Carry with you emergency supplies like flares and flashlights as well as the obvious car maintenance items.

2. Make sure your phone is fully charged. Check your cell service and reconsider moving from an area without service to an area with service.

3. Make sure a trusted person knows where you are going and has all your credentials including your License plate and vehicle description.

4. Always fish with others. Safety in numbers speaks a lot and will prevent a potential creep from considering an attack. Though this will not prevent the ever-popular Smash and Grab that goes on in many parking lots and fishing pullouts. Always look at the ground for broken window glass that can be indicative of prior robberies.

5. Know exactly where you are when you arrive. Check your GPS for coordinates. This will come in handy if you need to call 911 and are needed to be located.

6. When you arrive at the parking lot or pullout be aware - be situationally aware at all times. Take a moment in your car to feel your surroundings before you jump out and start putting your gear together. Take pictures of other cars in the parking lot, remember details, faces, landmarks, and identifying signs, markers, or flora. Sometimes we can get into a zen-like trance focusing more on our imminent fishing experience than the potential danger that might be there. If you don't feel safe, don't stay. Trust your intuition.

7. Have a plan. Park your car in a way that you can easily exit the area. If the lot is lit, park under the lights. If arriving at a new fishing spot, scan for the path or trail that leads to the water and make sure you plan an entrance and exit strategy to and from the water.

8. Have your pepper spray, knife, gun, or whistle ready in your hand and ready to use. Ahead of time, practice the muscle memory of pulling your gun, spraying bear spray in someone's face, unsheathing and opening your knife, or practice implementing whatever form of protection you use. Practice Practice Practice so that when in an emergency situation your training takes over. Also, understand your abilities and knowledge of the protection you choose. Take a class before you take your firearm into the wilds, know what you're doing and how to do it. You might be vulnerable during that time we are putting our waders on, setting up our rods, and a potential attacker may take advantage of that.

9. If you are attacked, harassed, or feel frightened in a situation, try to keep calm. Get to a safe place, preferably your car, lock all doors, and call 911 immediately. You must be prepared to make a statement with 911 and you need to keep as calm as possible so the responders can help you.

10. As you travel to the water, keep alert and aware. The same goes for once you get down to the water. Check upriver, downriver, scan for anyone else in the vicinity and note their location versus yours. The roar of a river can make you more vulnerable if someone nears you from behind. Look over your shoulder, to the left and right, periodically.

11. Know the location of the others you are fishing with. Don't go around the bend where your friends and fellow fishers can't see you. Wave to your fishing partners so they know you are aware of where they are.


I hope to expand on more Safety Tips in the near future but here is a good start. I intend on joining WFFC by the end of the week. I'd love to get a copy of the article you publish that took place on the river I love the most, the Stillaguamish.

The article I wrote will be published next month.
 

DrHare

The Coho King
Unfortunately I think it's pretty much up to us. First of all keep reporting these incidents on FFF and file a police report as well as contacting the WDFW or whichever public lands management (Snohomish County Parks & Rec in this case).
@Zoomer sent some great advice to me via email, here's what she wrote:

I think if you re-read my original post you will find the chrono of the details there. While I am not pleased with the response (lack of) from Snohomish County Sherriff Office and Deputy Westick and Deputy Friestat. I did find more interest with Ranger Wheeler at Snohomish County Parks and Recreation. The Parks and Recreation own the land at C-Post in conjunction with DNR as part of the Oso Slide Memorial. I also was in contact with Officer Peters with WDFW but she is spread so thin that I doubt she can investigate much.

Anyways, thanks for getting the word out there. The more people know this is happening may save someone else from getting scared or injured. My worry is the guys might elevate their bullying and somebody WILL get hurt.

Here are some recommendations for Safety Tips I've compiled that I hope will be helpful to other anglers fishing on Public Lands. I am working with United Women on the Fly on a Safety Segment they hope to post later this month.

1. When departing on your fishing journey, make sure your gas tank is full, especially if you are going to a remote area. Check that your spare tire is full of air. Carry with you emergency supplies like flares and flashlights as well as the obvious car maintenance items.

2. Make sure your phone is fully charged. Check your cell service and reconsider moving from an area without service to an area with service.

3. Make sure a trusted person knows where you are going and has all your credentials including your License plate and vehicle description.

4. Always fish with others. Safety in numbers speaks a lot and will prevent a potential creep from considering an attack. Though this will not prevent the ever-popular Smash and Grab that goes on in many parking lots and fishing pullouts. Always look at the ground for broken window glass that can be indicative of prior robberies.

5. Know exactly where you are when you arrive. Check your GPS for coordinates. This will come in handy if you need to call 911 and are needed to be located.

6. When you arrive at the parking lot or pullout be aware - be situationally aware at all times. Take a moment in your car to feel your surroundings before you jump out and start putting your gear together. Take pictures of other cars in the parking lot, remember details, faces, landmarks, and identifying signs, markers, or flora. Sometimes we can get into a zen-like trance focusing more on our imminent fishing experience than the potential danger that might be there. If you don't feel safe, don't stay. Trust your intuition.

7. Have a plan. Park your car in a way that you can easily exit the area. If the lot is lit, park under the lights. If arriving at a new fishing spot, scan for the path or trail that leads to the water and make sure you plan an entrance and exit strategy to and from the water.

8. Have your pepper spray, knife, gun, or whistle ready in your hand and ready to use. Ahead of time, practice the muscle memory of pulling your gun, spraying bear spray in someone's face, unsheathing and opening your knife, or practice implementing whatever form of protection you use. Practice Practice Practice so that when in an emergency situation your training takes over. Also, understand your abilities and knowledge of the protection you choose. Take a class before you take your firearm into the wilds, know what you're doing and how to do it. You might be vulnerable during that time we are putting our waders on, setting up our rods, and a potential attacker may take advantage of that.

9. If you are attacked, harassed, or feel frightened in a situation, try to keep calm. Get to a safe place, preferably your car, lock all doors, and call 911 immediately. You must be prepared to make a statement with 911 and you need to keep as calm as possible so the responders can help you.

10. As you travel to the water, keep alert and aware. The same goes for once you get down to the water. Check upriver, downriver, scan for anyone else in the vicinity and note their location versus yours. The roar of a river can make you more vulnerable if someone nears you from behind. Look over your shoulder, to the left and right, periodically.

11. Know the location of the others you are fishing with. Don't go around the bend where your friends and fellow fishers can't see you. Wave to your fishing partners so they know you are aware of where they are.


I hope to expand on more Safety Tips in the near future but here is a good start. I intend on joining WFFC by the end of the week. I'd love to get a copy of the article you publish that took place on the river I love the most, the Stillaguamish.

The article I wrote will be published next month.
I commented before, you should contact the Stillaguamish Tribe's PD and DNR....fisheries enforcement officer. The Tribe has restoration property along the River and could have more man power and interest to assist. The can work with SnoCo and resolve. Welcome to DM me if need more info.
 

LilCutts

Semper Doodle
WFF Supporter
I commented before, you should contact the Stillaguamish Tribe's PD and DNR....fisheries enforcement officer. The Tribe has restoration property along the River and could have more man power and interest to assist. The can work with SnoCo and resolve. Welcome to DM me if need more info.
I'll pass this info along, thanks.
 

MileHighFlyGuy

Active Member
This may have a bit to do with our (our my ass ) choice in Governors. National Guard and some well charged fire hoses, clean it up?
My guess is that if the window breakers, petty thieves, gun toting hooligans, and many of the drug bums being complained about here were to vote, it would not be for our present governor or anyone in his political party. His philosophical opponents have long ago abandoned the moral highground.
 

skyrise

CCA, Hatchery Wild Coexist
I commented before, you should contact the Stillaguamish Tribe's PD and DNR....fisheries enforcement officer. The Tribe has restoration property along the River and could have more man power and interest to assist. The can work with SnoCo and resolve. Welcome to DM me if need more info.
I will try to bring this up to my father in law as he knows some of the enforcement guys with the Tulalip tribe. Maybe get some ideas as this garbage goes on in and around Marysville and around.
Lilcutts, thank you for that check list.
And can’t say this enough times but report any and all problems.
 

Dustin Bise

reformed hot-spotter
bummer. when i was 8 myself and a friend were chased about a 1/4 mile through the forest but a gun popping psycho. its a horrible feeling
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top