NFR Covid Vaccines

Jojo

A sometimes eternal optimist
WFF Supporter
All good news. I'm sure it's been posted on this thread already, but it's worth remembering how incredible it is to have three incredibly safe, effective vaccines come online in less than a year. Completely unprecedented. Prior to the pandemic, the process could take 10-15 years to go from start to finish.

The delays, snafus, etc are an annoyance, but negotiating through an imperfect process falls into the "good problem to have" category relative to where we could be in the absence of a vaccine. Not only that - the US is vaccinating the population much faster than most of the developed world. Only Israel, England, and one other country have rolled out the vaccine faster.

There are lots of imperfections that it's fair enough to grumble about, but having this many vaccines this effective available this quickly is also something worth taking a moment to be thankful for!
Yes @JayB ! I forget who here posted the image of the light at the end of the tunnel. I’m too lazy right now to find it. But that’s the response i want to put up.
 

longputt

Active Member
All good news. I'm sure it's been posted on this thread already, but it's worth remembering how incredible it is to have three incredibly safe, effective vaccines come online in less than a year. Completely unprecedented. Prior to the pandemic, the process could take 10-15 years to go from start to finish.

The delays, snafus, etc are an annoyance, but negotiating through an imperfect process falls into the "good problem to have" category relative to where we could be in the absence of a vaccine. Not only that - the US is vaccinating the population much faster than most of the developed world. Only Israel, England, and one other country have rolled out the vaccine faster.

There are lots of imperfections that it's fair enough to grumble about, but having this many vaccines this effective available this quickly is also something worth taking a moment to be thankful for!
This is a great summary...I'll add 2 things:

1. If someone here is a Project Management Professional they can explain risk better than I can but Operation Warp Speed took on huge risk. This is not technical risk they did everything right and didn't cut corners, but they took on huge cost risk. When people say we cannot do things the way we used to need to study Operation Warp Speed, it was fantastic. Costly yes, but wildly successful.
2. As frustrating as it is to have vaccine sites run out of vaccine it is actually the right way for this to work. We want the production of vaccine to be the rate limiting step. Move the bottleneck to production. Last summer when they were throwing away milk that is an example of when distribution is the limiting step and it is bad news. Frustrating yes, but the right thing.

I found the vaccine development and deployment processes remarkable. It was unfortunate that the election overwhelmed the coverage because it is an uplifting success story. In September 2020 Fauci said we would have heard immunity by May/June 2021...the Operation Warp Speed people knew what they were doing and it was very well executed.

Just one example: They were building freezers in June 2020...long before they knew they needed them.
 
Last edited:

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
WFF Supporter
This is a great summary...I'll add 2 things:

1. If someone here is a Project Management Professional they can explain risk better than I can but Operation Warp Speed took on huge risk. This is not technical risk they did everything right and didn't cut corners, but they took on huge cost risk. When people say we cannot do things the way we used to need to study Operation Warp Speed, it was fantastic. Costly yes, but wildly successful.
2. As frustrating as it is to have vaccine sites run out of vaccine it is actually the right way for this to work. We want the production of vaccine to be the rate limiting step. Move the bottleneck to production. Last summer when they were throwing away milk that is an example of when distribution is the limiting step and it is bad news. Frustrating yes, but the right thing.

I found the vaccine development and deployment processes remarkable. It was unfortunate that the election overwhelmed the coverage because it is an uplifting success story. In September 2019 Fauci said we would have heard immunity by May/June...the Operation Warp Speed people knew what they were doing and it was very well executed.

Just one example: They were building freezers in June 2019...long before they knew they needed them.
2020?
 

Rocking Chair Fan

No more hot spotting
Talking with friends, family and my personal experience, older folks do not seem to react to the Moderna vaccine as much as the Pfizer vaccine. While each reacted differently it is less uncomfortable.

The best thing about them is a little bit of discomfort is a lot better than the alternative...
 

Canuck from Kansas

WFF Supporter
Operation Warp Speed was/is great success, but I will add one clarification (Longputt, maybe you meant this). It was mostly the Government that took on the risk, ie, buying up vaccines they did not know would work, though it was a pretty good educated guess (mRNA vaccines had been in the works for over a decade, though none brought to market).

Cheers
 
Last edited:

longputt

Active Member
Operation Warp Speed was/is great success, but I will add one clarification (Longputt, maybe you meant this). It was mostly the Government that took on the risk, ie, buying up vaccines they did not know would work, though it was a pretty good educated guess (mRNA vaccines had been in the works for over a decade, though none brought to market).

Cheers
You are 100% correct it was the government risk (our taxes!). I agree they were pretty confident and the freezers were actually a fairly high probability.

Another presentation I saw was the DOD Logistics explaining how many freezers we needed and where they needed to be located to get 100% coverage of the US and not spoil the vaccine.

I hope they make a documentary some day.
 
Hi all, if you're a current or former servicemember, JBLM just opened up appointments to TriCare enrolled servicemembers AND THEIR enrolled family members ages 16-65 with underlying health conditions to receive a COVID vaccine. Call (800) 404-4506 for an appointment. Additionally, if you are enrolled with the VA, you may be placed on their stand-by list to take a 'no-show or cancelled appointment' at the American Lake VA by calling daily (253) 582-8440, option #3, followed by option #2. The shots are given at the American Lake VA, building #132.
 

Mems

Active Member
You should be able to fish, my arm was just as sore as if I had told my wife a bad joke.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NRC

Steve Kokita

FISHON206
I’m getting it again in my casting arm....my left arm still bothers me from my second shringrex shot back in December....been told they must’ve hit a nerve. Just keep them beers coming!
 

longputt

Active Member
My wife and I are in the Johnson &Johnson trial... She was placebo, I haven't found out yet what I got. Tomorrow morning I will get unblinded and get the vaccine if needed, and she will get vaccinated.
If I understand this you let yourself be exposed without knowing if the vaccine worked, the vaccine was safe or if you even got the vaccine?

If so, Thank You
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top