Skagit and Sauk to open for spring C&R

CreekScrambler

Active Member
I've been wearing holes in my waders since December trying to learn as much as I can about runs and access on the Skagit. As much as I've enjoyed the bulls I've caught so far, I'm really hoping that lightning strikes this spring C&R season. Currently focusing on the river below the spring season section and will change over on Feb 1st. I've got exploratory days set aside to figure out the river above the Dalles bridge.
 

CreekScrambler

Active Member
That's an interesting question raised...if the run is forecast for just over 4k fish and the treaty tribes want to figure out how many fish to take, what is the market value of the total fish harvested in the window of time discussed (# of fish x avg pounds of meat/fish x market price/lb)? Angler impact is supposed to be quite low in during the C&R season, correct?

I'm wondering if there's any meaningful money to be made harvesting steelhead or if it's just an exercising-of-rights operation per the treaty. There's a chance that all this discussion is happening over maybe a few hundred bucks?
 

Cruik

WFF Supporter
That's an interesting question raised...if the run is forecast for just over 4k fish and the treaty tribes want to figure out how many fish to take, what is the market value of the total fish harvested in the window of time discussed (# of fish x avg pounds of meat/fish x market price/lb)? Angler impact is supposed to be quite low in during the C&R season, correct?

I'm wondering if there's any meaningful money to be made harvesting steelhead or if it's just an exercising-of-rights operation per the treaty. There's a chance that all this discussion is happening over maybe a few hundred bucks?

I see where you're going, but I'll warn you: calculating the value of dead steelhead leads only to madness. They're worth so little that if every single Washingtonian wild steelhead was netted and brought to seafood markets, you could finance their purchase with the sale of a modest lakefront home in Seattle.
 
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Smalma

Active Member
Some of the tribal fishers I have talked with about the low economic value of their catch explained to me they continue fish steelhead in at least part because they enjoy the fishing and the fish - sound familiar?

Also suspect that we can not overlook the historic importance of their steelhead fishing in their culture. Not the least of which is the major role that "the steelhead wars" played in establishing their treaty fishing rights.

Curt
 

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