Carrying two rods

Speyrod GB

Active Member
I just bring one rod. I fish a floating line. I have a few different poly leaders with me, should I need to try and sink a streamer or other fly. I have fished dries, dry dropper, and streamers. I have thought about packing a second rod, but have never figured out what to do with the second rod while I'm fishing. I also tend to move quickly while I'm fishing.
 

kmudgn

Active Member
My son has been looking at something like this thinking 2 rods would be handy. Most of our streams are like this, and l just think it would always be catching the brush above or behind you, and you would never get in or out. I think we're seeing water type and preferred techniques influence the choice. View attachment 268868
It is hard enough trying to move through the woods/bushwhack, etc. with one rod I can't imagine using that holder with the rod sticking up behind. Maybe if you only get to water in areas without trees and bushes it would work, but beyond that I don't think it would be useful.
In addition, I think it would be interfere with casting.
 

Salmo_g

WFF Supporter
I nearly always fish on the move, so carrying extra rods and packs that get set down on the bank somewhere just doesn't work for me. The natural and logical solution is to train one or more of the hired help around the manor to serve as a ghillie and have him tote extra rods and the large pack. This works out quite well. You should try it.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
My son has been looking at something like this thinking 2 rods would be handy. Most of our streams are like this, and l just think it would always be catching the brush above or behind you, and you would never get in or out. I think we're seeing water type and preferred techniques influence the choice. View attachment 268868
90% or more of my freshwater fishing is on streams like this or smaller. Over the last 3 years I have honestly found 8-13 ft telescoping Tenkara rods or, when a stream is running higher-wider, a 14-17 ft Keiryu rod have generally been more efficient, effective, and versatile than my western 7 to 9 ft - 3 to 5 weight bamboo or graphite rods for several reasons.

Since they collapse to 24" or less I can easily carry two or three rods in a side pocket of my fishing pack while hiking in. Rigging a T-rod with a pre-rigged line takes less than two minutes so I seldom rig at the car. In about 30 seconds or less I can collapse a rigged rod and secure the line and fly to a simple, low profile "line winder" that I leave attached to each of my rods, or on a line spool that can be slipped over the end of the collapsed rod to carry in my hand or in my pack's side pocket. That means I can switch between rigged rods and be fishing again in about a minute.
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
90% or more of my freshwater fishing is on streams like this or smaller. Over the last 3 years I have honestly found 8-13 ft telescoping Tenkara rods or, when a stream is running higher-wider, a 14-17 ft Keiryu rod have generally been more efficient, effective, and versatile than my western 7 to 9 ft - 3 to 5 weight bamboo or graphite rods for several reasons.

Since they collapse to 24" or less I can easily carry two or three rods in a side pocket of my fishing pack while hiking in. Rigging a T-rod with a pre-rigged line takes less than two minutes so I seldom rig at the car. In about 30 seconds or less I can collapse a rigged rod and secure the line and fly to a simple, low profile "line winder" that I leave attached to each of my rods, or on a line spool that can be slipped over the end of the collapsed rod to carry in my hand or in my pack's side pocket. That means I can switch between rigged rods and be fishing again in about a minute.
Could you recommend a good 8-13 foot Tenkara rod? I've been thinking of trying it out but don't know much about it.
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
Over the last 3 years I have honestly found 8-13 ft telescoping Tenkara rods or, when a stream is running higher-wider, a 14-17 ft Keiryu rod have generally been more efficient, effective, and versatile than my western 7 to 9 ft - 3 to 5 weight bamboo or graphite rods for several reasons.

Carrying a tenkara rod is a very cool idea, for the reasons you mentioned. I gave tenkara a try, a few years ago, and didn't really enjoy it. However, if you do enjoy it, then it seems like a no-brainer.
 

sea2stream

New Member
Using a rod sleeve for your other rod might work. I use half length rod sleeves to transport my rods already rigged up. You rig up the rod then take it apart at the halfway mark and place it in the sleeve. With this I'm able to keep them in my truck cab ready to go. After some practice you'll get pretty good and keeping them from getting tangled when you split them in half and put them back together.

I use the half single Scientific Angler https://www.scientificanglers.com/product/rod-sleeve/
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Could you recommend a good 8-13 foot Tenkara rod? I've been thinking of trying it out but don't know much about it.
Honestly I am not aware of any good 8 - 13 foot T-rods. That's why I carry 2, and sometimes 3 rods.

Sorry if this looks long winded but stay with me and I hope it makes sense.
1. I have an 8 - 10 ft slow action-full flex rod I use for small creeks. It is feather light, is very easy to cast very accurately to about 15 feet, doesn't launch dinks when setting the hook, makes dinks feel sporting, yet can handle larger fish (so far to 14"), and is a real blast with fish that large! But I have lost a 14" fish because the rod has so much flex that I couldn't move it far enough in heavy brush and overhead cover to get a good hookset. It works well with dry flies and wet flies to several inches below the surface. (Tenkara Times Watershed 300)
2. I have a moderately fast-tip flex 8 - 11 ft rod I also use for small creeks. It is much less pleasant to cast (I can't feel it load like the other) but does cast very accurately to about 16 ft, gets good hooksets in heavy brush and overhead cover or deeper in the water column, and would be able to manage larger fish than I have caught on a T-rod; est 18"-20". But it launches dinks without a lot of hookset finesse that I have to reacquire each time I use it. It will fish dry flies, wet flies, and weighted nymphs to 5 ft below the surface. (DRAGONtail Mizuchi zx340)
3. I have a slow action-full flex 10 - 12.5 ft rod I use for small rivers. It is fairly light for its length, is very easy to cast very accurately to about 18 ft, It doesn't launch dinks when setting the hook, makes dinks feel sporting, yet can handle larger fish (so far to a chunky 12" in moderately strong current) and is a real blast with fish that size. It works well with dry flies and wet flies to several inches below the surface. (DRAGONtail Mutant zx380)
4. My first T-rod is a 10 - 13 ft rod with a moderate action mid-flex. I have caught fish to 15" in small creeks to mid-sized rivers. It's fairly light in the hand, is easy to cast very accurately to about 20'. Because of its length dinks can get launched but they do feel sporting and 15" fish in current is epic fun. It will fish dry flies, wet flies, and weighted nymphs to ~3 ft below the surface. (DRAGONtail Hydra zx390)

To sum up it depends a bit on where you will fish, the size fish you are apt to encounter, and the types (dry-wet- weighted) of flies you need to use to reach them at those locations.
My son was interested in Tenkara so I bought him #4 for Christmas to get him started. DRAGONtail is located near Boise and I typically have product from them on my doorstep in the South Sound area in 3-4 days.
 
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ryc72

Active Member
carrying two rods on your own just isn’t worth it. Only time I do that now is when Im fishing with a guide. If it’s just me then it’s only one rod. I used to carry two rods and it just isn’t worth it..such a pita.
 

sroffe

Active Member
I nearly always fish on the move, so carrying extra rods and packs that get set down on the bank somewhere just doesn't work for me. The natural and logical solution is to train one or more of the hired help around the manor to serve as a ghillie and have him tote extra rods and the large pack. This works out quite well. You should try it.
My hired help moved out. Tired of free room and board, and decided to take on a mortgage of his own.
 

spcoldsmoke

New Member
I pinch the rod I'm not using between my hip pack belt and my hip, on my non-casting side. Cinch it down tight. Seems to work well.
 

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