Albacore Flies

SilverFly

Active Member
Which part, the dark pink, or the bi-color w mostly orange?
More dark pink but definitely some orange in there. We're probably overthinking this (big surprise) but I'd go with something a tad less orange, and more red/pink - especially in the marabou. The colors in the online pics I've seen are accurate to the krill I've seen on the boat. They are skinny little buggers too.

These are Antarctic krill but they look the same as the ones I've seen offshore.

1628284142498.png
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Premium
More dark pink but definitely some orange in there. We're probably overthinking this (big surprise) but I'd go with something a tad less orange, and more red/pink - especially in the marabou. The colors in the online pics I've seen are accurate to the krill I've seen on the boat. They are skinny little buggers too.

These are Antarctic krill but they look the same as the ones I've seen offshore.

View attachment 291240
I'm not seeing much pink in those.....of course I'm also seeing far less orange than I've got. I really wanted some marabou in it just so that it had better movement.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
I'm not seeing much pink in those.....of course I'm also seeing far less orange than I've got. I really wanted some marabou in it just so that it had better movement.
Could be, but definitely less orange. The "krill" pattern I used to fish at Drano and other still water trib mouth fisheries is pretty much all red. Who knows if the steelhead, coho, and chinook ate it because it looks like something they'd eaten a bazillion of in the ocean - but it's caught a "few".

krill-fly.png
 

Jake

veni, vidi, fishi
More dark pink but definitely some orange in there. We're probably overthinking this (big surprise) but I'd go with something a tad less orange, and more red/pink - especially in the marabou. The colors in the online pics I've seen are accurate to the krill I've seen on the boat. They are skinny little buggers too.

These are Antarctic krill but they look the same as the ones I've seen offshore.

View attachment 291240
I sat down to try some, but then my kids wanted to tie. So, that’s the direction the evening went.

For fun: A 5 year-old’s interpretation of a krill fly.

“He swims backwards cause he’s got a problem with his brain, which is pretty common for a krill ‘cause their brains are so small that one little bonk makes their brains damaged.”
AF564262-95A9-4563-8EFB-431935A4ACB0.jpeg

And a 9 year old who asked at the end: “Wait. What does a shrimp look like again?”

CA27B34B-5B47-4419-A6E3-634B0F8D86A6.jpeg

EDIT: “This one haves less brain damage.”
E2E6C593-F7CE-48AD-B6AF-2AB302615CB2.jpeg
 
Last edited:

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
I sat down to try some, but then my kids wanted to tie. So, that’s the direction the evening went.

For fun: A 5 year-old’s interpretation of a krill fly.

“He swims backwards cause he’s got a problem with his brain, which is pretty common for a krill ‘cause their brains are so small that one little bonk makes their brains damaged.”
View attachment 291282

And a 9 year old who asked at the end: “Wait. What does a shrimp look like again?”

View attachment 291285


The reversed krill spider!
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Premium
I sat down to try some, but then my kids wanted to tie. So, that’s the direction the evening went.

For fun: A 5 year-old’s interpretation of a krill fly.

“He swims backwards cause he’s got a problem with his brain, which is pretty common for a krill ‘cause their brains are so small that one little bonk makes their brains damaged.”
View attachment 291282

And a 9 year old who asked at the end: “Wait. What does a shrimp look like again?”

View attachment 291285

EDIT: “This one haves less brain damage.”
View attachment 291286
:D I didn't wanna say anything.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
I sat down to try some, but then my kids wanted to tie. So, that’s the direction the evening went.

For fun: A 5 year-old’s interpretation of a krill fly.

“He swims backwards cause he’s got a problem with his brain, which is pretty common for a krill ‘cause their brains are so small that one little bonk makes their brains damaged.”
View attachment 291282

And a 9 year old who asked at the end: “Wait. What does a shrimp look like again?”

View attachment 291285

EDIT: “This one haves less brain damage.”
View attachment 291286

Your kids tied those?! Amazing!
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Premium
Hi folks,
To my eye, live krill are clear with red pigmentation marking the edges of body segmentation (see The Secret Life of Krill). I might tie a clear (or white) bodied fly with red segmentation, very much like the first picture that Jake posted above (5yo for the win...).
There are other pelagic crustaceans, especially shrimp that are over much redder in color (see Bioluminescence Cruise: Vertical Migration). Remember, red is the color that penetrates the least distance in water; after about 30', there is no more red photons to reflect off a red pigment (see Light in the ocean). If you cut yourself diving at 60', your blood looks a bit greenish because there are not red photons to be reflected by hemoglobin (see Is human blood ever any color than red). In the absence of red photons, a red pigment would absorb all other colors of light and look black. To a tuna that is holding at 60' or more, a surface fly that is red would look black as any red photons reflecting off the red pigments would be absorbed by the water. As the tuna zoomed up from the depths to attack your fly, the fly would appear to be redder and redder because more of the red photons reflected off the fly would reach the eye of the tuna. If a red fly were at a depth greater than about 30 feet, it would always look black to the tuna because there are no red photons in the available light to be reflected off the red pigments of the fly.
One of the dominant behavioral patterns in the open ocean is diel vertical migration (see Vertical migration. A variety of open ocean lower-level predators, such as salps, myctophid fishes, krill, shrimp, jellyfish, migrate to the surface to feed on plankton, such as copepods, at night and then return to the dark ocean depths (600-1000') during the day to avoid visually-feeding predators like tuna. Any vertical migrator that stays too long will be a quick breakfast for a hungry tuna.
I wonder if there is enough light on full moons for tuna to feed on this vertically-migrating buffet at night and if this might explain the often slow tuna fishing that occurs after full moon nights.
Steve
 

Jake

veni, vidi, fishi
Hi folks,
To my eye, live krill are clear with red pigmentation marking the edges of body segmentation (see The Secret Life of Krill). I might tie a clear (or white) bodied fly with red segmentation, very much like the first picture that Jake posted above (5yo for the win...).
There are other pelagic crustaceans, especially shrimp that are over much redder in color (see Bioluminescence Cruise: Vertical Migration). Remember, red is the color that penetrates the least distance in water; after about 30', there is no more red photons to reflect off a red pigment (see Light in the ocean). If you cut yourself diving at 60', your blood looks a bit greenish because there are not red photons to be reflected by hemoglobin (see Is human blood ever any color than red). In the absence of red photons, a red pigment would absorb all other colors of light and look black. To a tuna that is holding at 60' or more, a surface fly that is red would look black as any red photons reflecting off the red pigments would be absorbed by the water. As the tuna zoomed up from the depths to attack your fly, the fly would appear to be redder and redder because more of the red photons reflected off the fly would reach the eye of the tuna. If a red fly were at a depth greater than about 30 feet, it would always look black to the tuna because there are no red photons in the available light to be reflected off the red pigments of the fly.
One of the dominant behavioral patterns in the open ocean is diel vertical migration (see Vertical migration. A variety of open ocean lower-level predators, such as salps, myctophid fishes, krill, shrimp, jellyfish, migrate to the surface to feed on plankton, such as copepods, at night and then return to the dark ocean depths (600-1000') during the day to avoid visually-feeding predators like tuna. Any vertical migrator that stays too long will be a quick breakfast for a hungry tuna.
I wonder if there is enough light on full moons for tuna to feed on this vertically-migrating buffet at night and if this might explain the often slow tuna fishing that occurs after full moon nights.
Steve
How much of an albacore’s diet is fish vs squid? Seems like squid are an abundant pelagic food source but in my box I’ve only tied one squid fly and am wondering if I should add more for a day when little seems to be working.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Premium
How much of an albacore’s diet is fish vs squid? Seems like squid are an abundant pelagic food source but in my box I’ve only tied one squid fly and am wondering if I should add more for a day when little seems to be working.
Hi Jake,
I do not know if there have been specific studies of the diet of fish caught off Oregon and Washington specifically during the late summer fishery. But there have been investigations of their diet from California (with some Oregon and Washington) and the Southeast Pacific. Based on the "number of prey items" data from fish off the West Coast, various squid species comprise approximately 11% of the diet. Crustaceans as a group form 48% of the diet with krill alone forming 26% and pelagic sergestid shrimp at 15%. Fish overall form 41% of the items in the diet with anchovies at 25%.
These are summaries which lack nuances of seasonality or location. Nick may have a much better idea of what he has encountered off the Washington coast during the late summer fishery. The data indicate that albacore are generalist predators. Unlike a trout that might become fixated on a specific hatch, I suspect that albacore are much more opportunistic.
Steve
 

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