Anything new??

Mark Kadoshima

Active Member
What sort of jig did you use for the scallops?
I just use the marking board, then basically freehand with a small rotary sander and a tongue depressor as a thickness gauge...not very machinist like, but seems to work. I stay away from ferrules or splice joints...and the toward the tip. I noticed the hollow built rods really seem to have a livelier 'action' to them.
 

Mark Kadoshima

Active Member
Just split cane for an 8' 6" 6wt three piece with two tips...a heavy streamer tip and a lighter dry tip. We'll see.
My supposed 2 wt spey rod seems sort of 'strong' as I'm oiling it up with Tru oil. I think I'll sign and mark the rod after I actually cast a few different lines on it to see what the true line weight is : ) .... highlighting the difference between a hobbyist and a professional rod builder...
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
WFF Supporter
As a hobbyist you get to do whatever the heck you want. Every time. You get to follow through on your most unlikely to succeed ideas no matter how hairbrained they may be. It's much more fun than just following directions.
 

Mark Kadoshima

Active Member
IMG_1449.jpg Started wrapping my supposed 10' 6" 2 wt double hander. Well....when I taped it up, have to admit it feels more like a 4 wt. We'll see. Always an exciting mystery with my rods. Tried out a new way to do the reel seat. Not too sure about it also, but it's sort of different.
Hope to get after some SRC tomorrow.
 

BearBio

Active Member
Not 'boo related but my wife got me a '69 FJ40 Land Cruiser for Valentine's Day (Well, she told me I could use my money). It's a retromod with a Chevy V8. That, plus some health issues, have kept me busy but each day is better!

Decided yesterday on doing a trip to Yellowstone in fall and (hopefully) fishing the Madison (Got snowed out last time), maybe down to Boulder to see relatives and fish some rivers with my BIL. Have an "Internet friend" who wants to meet up in West Yellowstone.
 

Tom Bowden

Active Member
I'll veer off from Steve's topic and talk about "something old!" The other day I fished two rods that have sat in the closet for many years:

My "indicator rod" was the first one I ever made - in 2000 at the late Wayne Cattanach's clubhouse in Grayling, MI. It's a 7-1/2' Paul Young "Perfectionist" taper, and I only used it a few times. The rod was designed for fishing mid-sized streams with a DT4, but worked nicely with a WF5 and a small corky indicator.

My "cast and strip" rod was an 8' that I made in 2002 - a modified Powell "B" taper with a slope of .290/100", the same slope as one of my favorite Ray Gould tapers. This was the first rod that I designed myself, and used processes somewhat different from what Wayne taught us. For a few years, this was my favorite rod for everything - lakes, streams, and saltwater beaches. It has a smooth, fairly slow action.

I'll always be experimenting and trying new designs and techniques, but these rods worked great and brought back a lot of memories for me. I hope to use them on a more regular basis.
 

para_adams

Active Member
I'll veer off from Steve's topic and talk about "something old!" The other day I fished two rods that have sat in the closet for many years:

My "indicator rod" was the first one I ever made - in 2000 at the late Wayne Cattanach's clubhouse in Grayling, MI. It's a 7-1/2' Paul Young "Perfectionist" taper, and I only used it a few times. The rod was designed for fishing mid-sized streams with a DT4, but worked nicely with a WF5 and a small corky indicator.

My "cast and strip" rod was an 8' that I made in 2002 - a modified Powell "B" taper with a slope of .290/100", the same slope as one of my favorite Ray Gould tapers. This was the first rod that I designed myself, and used processes somewhat different from what Wayne taught us. For a few years, this was my favorite rod for everything - lakes, streams, and saltwater beaches. It has a smooth, fairly slow action.

I'll always be experimenting and trying new designs and techniques, but these rods worked great and brought back a lot of memories for me. I hope to use them on a more regular basis.
Tom, if you bring that 8' rod to our next rod casting party please make sure I give it a try, it sure sounds like the perfect rod to me.
 

Mark Kadoshima

Active Member
IMG_1456.jpg Taper of a Heddon #50 President 8' 6" 3 piece with a light and a heavy tip. I'm hoping for this to be my Hebgen Lake rod of the future. Rough planing.
I took my 8 foot three piece 5 wt out on a boat for src last Sunday. Stupidly, I brought my full sink 6 instead of my 5 wt line....but it cast it really well. Must've made a 6 wt instead. I'm noticing that some of the rods I'm making seem to be a little heavier that the planned taper. I think I'm doing a pretty good job of planing to the numbers, but maybe my gluing up is thick? Anyway, I'm going to 'skinny' down my numbers just a tad on this next rod.
 

wanderingrichard

Active Member
Ok, this is nostalgic. Happy to see a thread I can relate to.
About 50 years ago, I was given a 9ft. 3 section bamboo rod , in a canvas case with two extra tips (3rd sections) in an aluminum or tin tube. It looked a lot like the Grangers ive seen posted here, same color wraps , same grip, but on the reel seat, (silver metal maybe aluminum or light steel) it read, in script, E. F. Wiiliams and Sons.

Anyone ever heard of this company? It would have been an east coast thing, if that helps.

I still have it, somewhere in my storage of boyhood things. Seeing what some of you are doing makes me want to go find it, even its just to refinish and make a wall hanger out of it.
 

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