Cold toes too, 2

Buzzy

Active Member
It was sunny when I left my house this morning, the sun disappeared. I was fearin' "The Shawn Seeger Effect" might haunt me.
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The lake wasn't frozen over, Shawn, but it was plenty chilly (44F-45F according to my Humminbird 140C). I was able to stay in the lake kicking around for maybe 90 minutes before my feet were numb and I needed a shore break.
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Catching a decent trout gets the circulation going. This fishes tail was sticking just out of the net on the other end of the measure bag. 12+7: a measure net? Does this mean I can't fib about a fishes length?
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@Starman77 made it over this way - Rex was still kicking his float tube around when I called it quits. The sun came out early in the morning which made it possible for me to hang in there for about six hours.

I didn't have a banner day like @b_illymac had with his cold toes report but four nice fish to hand and being able to find open water the first week of February? A great day indeed.

For me, not any one pattern was consistent. I started out fishing a small Canadian Brown (Simiseal) jig under an indicator - three takes and two fish to hand. Then nothing - I fished other jigs, a blob (no love on the blob) and ended up with three grabs and the big fish staking a black/blue Simiseal leech stripped quite slowly.

One take away: when economizing what you're carrying into a lake, don't be foolish and leave that 4th fly box :eek: at home. I wanted to fish a snail pattern............

The hike gets longer each and every time ..
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
I was going to ask how you guys deal with that cold of water for extended periods. Last winter I could go about 2 hours at a time fishing for tigers in 45 degree water. This year, I started using foot warmers and was able to get 4 hours straight before having to get out and walk around a little bit in 42 degree water. I'm just wondering if there's a better way. Personally, I'd rather not have to stop at all.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I was going to ask how you guys deal with that cold of water for extended periods. Last winter I could go about 2 hours at a time fishing for tigers in 45 degree water. This year, I started using foot warmers and was able to get 4 hours straight before having to get out and walk around a little bit in 42 degree water. I'm just wondering if there's a better way. Personally, I'd rather not have to stop at all.
About 90 minutes is all my bladder will allow so there's that as well :rolleyes:. I've tried foot warmers (toasty toes?) but they don't seem to last that long and I seem to remember a few discussions somewhere on this forum about heated socks.
 

bakerite

Active Member
About 90 minutes is all my bladder will allow so there's that as well :rolleyes:. I've tried foot warmers (toasty toes?) but they don't seem to last that long and I seem to remember a few discussions somewhere on this forum about heated socks.
I'm going to get some Pat, just purchased for my kids for Christmas and they love them.
 

Clarkman

Huge Fly Guy
WFF Supporter
The bladder thing I took care of by wearing waist high waders. Perfect for peeing anywhere on the water. Probably wouldn't work so well in a float tube where you're sitting IN the water though....ha!
 

troutpocket

Active Member
I was going to ask how you guys deal with that cold of water for extended periods. Last winter I could go about 2 hours at a time fishing for tigers in 45 degree water. This year, I started using foot warmers and was able to get 4 hours straight before having to get out and walk around a little bit in 42 degree water. I'm just wondering if there's a better way. Personally, I'd rather not have to stop at all.
I don’t mind taking a break or two when the water is really cold. It forces me to assess if it’s just my feet or if I am getting chilled in general. I always bring food for a snack break and sometimes fish from shore for a bit. Two hours in the tube then a 15-30 minute break is my usual when water is 45 or colder. Most of my winter lakes require a walk so I’m warm when I start fishing and again for the drive home.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I don’t mind taking a break or two when the water is really cold. It forces me to assess if it’s just my feet or if I am getting chilled in general. I always bring food for a snack break and sometimes fish from shore for a bit. Two hours in the tube then a 15-30 minute break is my usual when water is 45 or colder. Most of my winter lakes require a walk so I’m warm when I start fishing and again for the drive home.
I was a bit more than warm by the time I got lakeside yesterday, I was sweating. I suppose fewer layers for the walk in and pace myself. I was very much warmed up by the time I got back to the truck yesterday afternoon. Like you, I fished from shore early on until I wasn't sweating and each shore break I'd fish from the beach and eat something.
 

Salmo_g

WFF Supporter
You guys got me beat. I don't think there's a trout in the world I want to catch badly enough to freeze for. Maybe it's because I have that Raynaud's syndrome where my hands and feet stop getting enough blood whenever exposed to cold. Or maybe the east side has "dry cold" like the "dry heat" of summer that is less bone chilling than the cold temps on the west side. I look forward to joining you sometime when I can bring my pram and keep my toes out of the damn water.
 

troutpocket

Active Member
I was a bit more than warm by the time I got lakeside yesterday, I was sweating. I suppose fewer layers for the walk in and pace myself. I was very much warmed up by the time I got back to the truck yesterday afternoon. Like you, I fished from shore early on until I wasn't sweating and each shore break I'd fish from the beach and eat something.
There is a lot of strategy in maintaining comfort throughout the day, for sure! I usually dress light for the walk in and layer up when I arrive. I carry my waders if I am going more than 1/4 mile to avoid overheating and reduce wear and tear on the neoprene feet. I bring at least one extra layer than I expect to use and leave a set of dry clothes in the car. A lightweight down vest or jacket under a goretex shell is a really warm combo for sitting in the tube...and cuts the wind.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
You guys got me beat. I don't think there's a trout in the world I want to catch badly enough to freeze for. Maybe it's because I have that Raynaud's syndrome where my hands and feet stop getting enough blood whenever exposed to cold. Or maybe the east side has "dry cold" like the "dry heat" of summer that is less bone chilling than the cold temps on the west side. I look forward to joining you sometime when I can bring my pram and keep my toes out of the damn water.
Steelhead angling is always done during lovely weather? ;-)
 

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