Cold toes too, 2

b_illymac

Soap Lake Posse
WFF Moderator
I was going to ask how you guys deal with that cold of water for extended periods. Last winter I could go about 2 hours at a time fishing for tigers in 45 degree water. This year, I started using foot warmers and was able to get 4 hours straight before having to get out and walk around a little bit in 42 degree water. I'm just wondering if there's a better way. Personally, I'd rather not have to stop at all.
I've started wearing my heavy winter hunting gear and this helps a lot. A lot of hunting companies sell insulated layer pants that are money in this situation with the bulk insulation I think being key. Mine are by Pnuma Outdoors. Been very happy with their quality.
 

Starman77

Active Member
Here's one reason why some of us brave the cold water and winter weather:

20210203_121727 25.jpg

This 19 inch rainbow was about as pretty a fish as you'll find in our seep lakes and this one fought very well, even in the cold water temperatures. I retained it and inside I found lots of fairly large snails and lots of tiny bloodworms (about a quarter inch to three-eighths inch long and very thin).

And contrary to what Billy said, I quit fishing at sunset when the air temperature dropped back down to around freezing (I know, getting soft in my old age):

20210203_165633 25.jpg
 

Freestone

WFF Supporter
Great report, Buzzy! It sounds like a fantastic day on the water, cold toes and all. If I ever get all my family caretaking finished and get back over on the correct side of the mountains, maybe we can fish together finally!

I love my Simms bootfoot waders in cold water! With a pair of toe warmers, my feet usually stay toasty warm. The trick is too take them out of the package to heat them up fully at least 30-60 mins before you stick them in your boots. However, in waders, they aren’t likely to get enough air to keep burning so they will turn off. But when they get exposed to air again, they will start up again. (which also means that if you take them out and put them in an airtight ziplock or two, you will be able to get another use out of them.)

Another option is to put them in your pants pockets over your femoral arteries and they may get enough air to keep your feet warmer. However, do not put foot warmers anywhere where they are exposed to more air (like inside gloves or fabric pockets) as they get hot enough to burn you. Hand warmers are formulated differently and will burn at a lower temperature when fully exposed to air.
 

Peach

Peach
Here's one reason why some of us brave the cold water and winter weather:

View attachment 270395

This 19 inch rainbow was about as pretty a fish as you'll find in our seep lakes and this one fought very well, even in the cold water temperatures. I retained it and inside I found lots of fairly large snails and lots of tiny bloodworms (about a quarter inch to three-eighths inch long and very thin).

And contrary to what Billy said, I quit fishing at sunset when the air temperature dropped back down to around freezing (I know, getting soft in my old age):

View attachment 270397
Nice fish and if you are going to retain a trout for consumption - this would probably be the best time of the year to keep it. My guess it will probably taste pretty good, for a trout any way :)
 

dp

~El Pescador
it's on my on personal bucket list to fish with b_illymac, Buzzy and Starman this season.
maybe all on the same lake.
feel free to reach out to me......
 
Last edited:

Starman77

Active Member
Nice fish and if you are going to retain a trout for consumption - this would probably be the best time of the year to keep it. My guess it will probably taste pretty good, for a trout any way :)
The rainbow had absolutely no musty or muddy flavor; the flesh was light orange and firm. Very good tasting as far as trout go. It is the algae that gives fish that musty or muddy flavor, so in the winter the algae blooms are pretty much gone and the fish taste pretty clean. However, lakes differ in their algae content, so a trout can taste good at this time of the year from this lake, but a fish from some other lake might not be as good. It also depends on where a fish is in the reproductive cycle. This one had no eggs or milt sacs, and the coloring suggests it was nowhere near spawning, so it was a prime specimen for eating. The trout cake sandwich I made (like a crab cake sandwich) was quite tasty, if I say so myself.
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
I've started wearing my heavy winter hunting gear and this helps a lot. A lot of hunting companies sell insulated layer pants that are money in this situation with the bulk insulation I think being key. Mine are by Pnuma Outdoors. Been very happy with their quality.
Costco is currently selling Gerry fleece pants with stretchy water-resistant nylon on the outside. I picked up a pair and think they will work well under waders.
 

Lance Magnuson

WFF Supporter
Since building a pram, my cold feet blues are memory. I wear felt lined Sorels and fleece bibs under rain pants.

Someone on this forum indicated wearing glove liners with nitrile glove outers to keep your hands dry. It works and while not toasty, I can still feel them after 4 hours of winter fishing.

I think getting out of the water is a civilized stage of evolution for a stillwater fly fisherman.
 

troutpocket

Active Member
Since building a pram, my cold feet blues are memory. I wear felt lined Sorels and fleece bibs under rain pants.

Someone on this forum indicated wearing glove liners with nitrile glove outers to keep your hands dry. It works and while not toasty, I can still feel them after 4 hours of winter fishing.

I think getting out of the water is a civilized stage of evolution for a stillwater fly fisherman.
How far can you carry your pram? :p

I have a boat to and it’s great for lakes with a launch.
 

Jiminsandiego

Active Member
Battery powered clothing has come a long way. Not designed for a four day backpacking trip, but for a four hour fishing trip this stuff can keep you as warm as you want. Hats, gloves, socks, shirts, pants, jackets ...whatever.. four hours of "warm as you want". I wore my heated "base layer shirt" today under my Carhart jacket. It was like wearing a heating blanket. Warm as toast, in a strong wind with snow.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top