Do you make your own dubbing?

Jesseg122

Active Member
How many of you make your own dubbing? If so, what do you use to make yours and do you prefer it over bought dubbing?
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
I hand-blend dubbing from commercial packs and fur cut from hares masks and patches from squirrel, mole, Australian possum, and other critters. Works great for adding a little, but not too much flash. For example, the Dave Whitlock fox squirrel nymph thorax blend has an awesome mix of flash colors, but I find the amount of flash too much. So I finger blend it with natural fur to get a more subtle flashiness.
 

hiddentalus

Member
Most of my leeches are bought simi seal and Llama hair mix mixed in my hand. Like Zak, a more subtle flash and a bit softer.
 

Squamishpoacher

Active Member
I blend dubbing in a kitchen blender I got at a thrift store. It came with two small cups. Use a bit of squirrel and dyed seal mostly. I keep one of the cups as a collection point for any bits I might normally discard of any fur or synthetic, and any wool that I cut into small pieces. Now and then this gets frapped for a one of a kind blend.
The oddest thing I've ever blended with squirrel or rabbit is the hair off the backs of a deer's ear. It's very spikey. Try it.
 
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jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
I buy hare masks and shave them myself. I separate the light/dark and fine/coarse hairs, so I have more control. I find that most commercial hare dubbing is crap. I also blend dubbings, by hand, so I don't have to buy every color.
 
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adamcu280

Active Member

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MT_Flyfisher

Active Member
Like others, I make some of my own dubbing with a coffee grinder. I’ve blended hare’s ear, fox, squirrel, rabbit, and seal.

However, my favorite blended fur is muskrat. It comes out very soft and fluffy, and easy to dub as thin or thick as you want. And, my favorite, and most used dry fly that I make from this blended muskrat is, of course, a Parachute Adams.

You can often find used coffee grinders at garage sales or thrift shops, and a whole muskrat skin, for example, can be purchased for a couple dollars. The total amount you could have invested isn’t much more than a couple packs of purchased dubbing, and the resultant dubbing is often a better quality than what you’d buy.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
I pull a batch occasionally from the dryer lint trap when I wash my dog's fleece blankets - various shades of brown and gray complete with guard hairs, depending on blanket colors. Pretty easy . . . it's the ". . . pick the fruit where you find the tree" concept.
 

Ricardo

Active Member
I buy hare masks and shave them myself. I separate the light/dark and fine/coarse hairs, so I have more control. I find that most commercial hare dubbing is crap. I also blend dubbings, by hand, so I don't have to buy every color.
Same here, I think it is the best way to do it, and the colors tones you get are are impossible to replicate with commercial dubbings. It is a similar experience to buying a partridge skin and buying partridge feather bags... Nonetheless, I've found myself using less and less dubbing in the past months, so the coffee grinder has not been spinning for some time now.
 

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