Help me complete my hammock backpacking setup?

Gary Knowels

Active Member
Help me complete my hammock setup for backpacking. I have an 11' gathered end hammock from Dutch. If I understand it correctly, I'll need the following
Underquilt
Top quilt
Bug netting
Tarp/fly

Is there anything else I need/should get?
I'm not an ultralight hiker and expect to use it spring through fall. I'm looking for items with good value, not necessarily the cheapest or most expensive.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Hello Gary.
Just out of curiosity, were you a member of The Mountaineers (Tacoma) in the early 1970s?

I've been using a Clark Jungle Hammock instead of a tent since 2013 (before Dutch bought the rights to mfg). It has a unique integrated and non-removable bug net and a breathable outer cocoon-like "weather shield" to keep the wind off me that can each be stowed. The weather shield provides 10° to 15° of warmth on cold nights. Another unique feature of the Clark is the bottom pockets where I stow my clothes. I sleep over them, rather than on them so it's not lumpy and it keeps them toasty warm to put on in the morning, and provides a little insulation underneath.
20130813_0014.JPG
I started out with a Thermarest pad and a sleeping bag I used to backpack and climb with. The Clark doesn't have a sleeve to hold the pad and keep it in place. I used "wings" for the pad that helped keep it underneath me but it still slipped around a lot inside the hammock and felt awkward. The wings did keep me warm along the side though.
20130618_0004.JPG

It does require a separate tarp for rain protection. Here is the tarp in "porch mode" but pitched low in case the wind came up.
20130617_0022.JPG
Here the tarp is pitched high in dual porch mode for shade on a hot day.
20150625_0035.JPG
As you can see I now use a top quilt and a full length underquilt. The underquilt extends up the side farther than the pad "wings" did. Much better than a pad; it's what sleeping on a cloud must feel like. Also, now the clothes stowed in the bottom pockets but above the underquilt are real toasty warm in the morning!

Now I keep my tarp in "snakeskins" making it easy to pack away on the outside of my pack like a climbing rope (after it rains) and I can rig it but keep it stowed to enjoy the stars on clear nights. If it starts to rain I can unstow it and connect to pre-driven stakes within a couple of minutes. Here I've stowed the weather shield but used the bug net. In addition to my clothes I treated around the hammock zipper with Permethrin which gave me a little haven sitting in the hammock among swarms of mosquitos that were here as this area at 5600' had only recently melted out in mid-July and was still very boggy.
2018 07 20_0241ed.jpg

Several times I have found myself in the clouds at high lakes with wind and sideways rain so I got a tarp with doors and a "2 internal poles mod" that gives me a ton of room along with much better wind and rain protection.

20170609_105942_edited-1.jpg
 

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Gary Knowels

Active Member
Hello Gary.
Just out of curiosity, were you a member of The Mountaineers (Tacoma) in the early 1970s?

I've been using a Clark Jungle Hammock instead of a tent since 2013 (before Dutch bought the rights to mfg). It has a unique integrated and non-removable bug net and a breathable outer cocoon-like "weather shield" to keep the wind off me that can each be stowed. The weather shield provides 10° to 15° of warmth on cold nights. Another unique feature of the Clark is the bottom pockets where I stow my clothes. I sleep over them, rather than on them so it's not lumpy and it keeps them toasty warm to put on in the morning, and provides a little insulation underneath.
View attachment 273339
I started out with a Thermarest pad and a sleeping bag I used to backpack and climb with. The Clark doesn't have a sleeve to hold the pad and keep it in place. I used "wings" for the pad that helped keep it underneath me but it still slipped around a lot inside the hammock and felt awkward. The wings did keep me warm along the side though.
View attachment 273331

It does require a separate tarp for rain protection. Here is the tarp in "porch mode" but pitched low in case the wind came up.
View attachment 273332
Here the tarp is pitched high in dual porch mode for shade on a hot day.
View attachment 273338
As you can see I now use a top quilt and a full length underquilt. The underquilt extends up the side farther than the pad "wings" did. Much better than a pad; it's what sleeping on a cloud must feel like. Also, now the clothes stowed in the bottom pockets but above the underquilt are real toasty warm in the morning!

Now I keep my tarp in "snakeskins" making it easy to pack away on the outside of my pack like a climbing rope (after it rains) and I can rig it but keep it stowed to enjoy the stars on clear nights. If it starts to rain I can unstow it and connect to pre-driven stakes within a couple of minutes. Here I've stowed the weather shield but used the bug net. In addition to my clothes I treated around the hammock zipper with Permethrin which gave me a little haven sitting in the hammock among swarms of mosquitos that were here as this area at 5600' had only recently melted out in mid-July and was still very boggy.
View attachment 273334

Several times I have found myself in the clouds at high lakes with wind and sideways rain so I got a tarp with doors and a "2 internal poles mod" that gives me a ton of room along with much better wind and rain protection.

View attachment 273335
Born in '86, definitely not the person you were thinking of. Thanks for the information!
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
Help me complete my hammock setup for backpacking. I have an 11' gathered end hammock from Dutch. If I understand it correctly, I'll need the following
Underquilt
Top quilt
Bug netting
Tarp/fly

Is there anything else I need/should get?
I'm not an ultralight hiker and expect to use it spring through fall. I'm looking for items with good value, not necessarily the cheapest or most expensive.
Lots carabineers, webbing, and cord?
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Lots carabineers, webbing, and cord?
Tree straps are essential for the hammock suspension. For low elevation destinations (bigger trees) two 6 ft straps and one 8 ft strap have always been enough. Above 4000' I can get by with two 6 ft straps. I only need 2 carabiners. I use low stretch Amsteel "whoopie slings" that are easier faster to adjust than knots on rope for the hammock suspension. Straps with buckles are also popular. I use low stretch reflective Dyneema cord for the tarp suspension and guy-outs. I also use Dutch Ti "Wasp" adjustable cleats instead of knots for the tarp suspension.
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Couple more things. I have a 40° top quilt and 30° underquilt; both a bit overstuffed with waterproof goose down. The top quilt doesn't have a hood but I keep a poly balaclava packed in the top quilt to sleep in. I also dedicate and keep a clean lightweight silk baselayer top and wool socks packed in the top quilt to sleep in. Zzzzzzzzzz very comfortably to the high 20°s.
 

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