45-70 lever

cmann886

Active Member
You just need to attach an anvil to the barrel with a chain. I had a college professor who claimed that someone stole a similar rifle and they caught the thief when he got treated for a broken wrist.
 

nwbobber

Active Member
Methinks those going on about the monstrous recoil have never shot one. Compare it to a twelve gauge. Of course I have never shot one of those guide guns with the short barrels... they might be worse than mine, and I have pursued the highest velocities recommended for the marlin. Still I enjoy shooting it, and have not heard a complaint from anyone. Buy it with a recoil pad on it, or put one on, and shoot the heck out of it. Shoot presto logs.... super fun reactive target.
 

gt

Active Member
a 12 gauge firing 550gr slugs will give you quite a bump. 1 1/4 oz field loads a piece of cake.
 

nwbobber

Active Member
583 grains per ounce, velocity is definitely a factor. Us govt loads were 405 grain, I bought a mold for those, at 1800 FPS more or less, was not uncomfortable to deal with. I shoot jacketed 300 grain as the velocity is pushing beyond what I would like to shoot lead. Less recoil with the 300’s.
 

Guy Gregory

Active Member
Marlin makes a .444 as well, not as sexy as .45-70, but a cool round anyway. I never founfd the .45-70 excessive, but I shot factory loads, most of which are not performance rounds. I also would recommend skipping an optic: iron sights are fine at the ranges you would shoot. Henry’s are very attractive, in any event big caliber guns are fun.
 

wetline dave

Active Member
And sometime back in the 70's Elmer Keith stated that a 45\70 was a perfect turkey rifle! If I recall correctly the article was in Guns and Ammo.

After some frustrating turkey adventures I tend to agree with him.,

Dave
 

Whitewater

Active Member
Own a Marlin stainless Guide gun ( 7 lbs w/ an 18 1/2 in bbl) cause I'm left handed and also used it for hunting elk where grizzly bears are.

Never had a problem, but to digress, there are places in MT, WY and ID where bears habituate to a gunshot, learning that some gunshots might lead to a gut pile.

A large loop lever, a peep site, better trigger and one piece extractor are worth while aftermarket options. It's a short range rifle 100-150 yds, had a scope, took it off.

Factory loads from Remington and WW are mild, but as mentioned above Buffalo Bore and Garret makes some hot loads with thick jacketed bullets that are not mild.

Recoil, most won't sit down at a bench and shoot 10 3 shot groups.
If you can shoot a 3 inch magnum 12 gauge goose load you probably won't have any problem with a 45-70.

Powder manufacturers have good loading data on their websites. Handloading makes this into a really versatile cartridge for elk.
 
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gt

Active Member
a buffalo gun caliber for elk??? come on now, my 270 is more than sufficient for clean kills.
 

Pescaphile

Active Member
In heavy timber where your shot is more likely on the order of 100 feet than 100 yards and you might get a visit from Mr. Fuzzy, I'd much prefer it to your 270. A rifle that handles quickly, has fast follow up if needed and throws a big bullet is a good choice in heavy cover with or without bears. I know folks who use them to shoot little blacktails.
 

gt

Active Member
In heavy timber where your shot is more likely on the order of 100 feet than 100 yards and you might get a visit from Mr. Fuzzy, I'd much prefer it to your 270. A rifle that handles quickly, has fast follow up if needed and throws a big bullet is a good choice in heavy cover with or without bears. I know folks who use them to shoot little blacktails.
selecting when to shoot and when to pass is not difficult. hunting in brush is an art form and requires more passing up shots than taking them. i am all about single bullet kill shots, bamm and down. that means i will pass up a shot if i can't accomplish my objective. brownies in the vicinity require a different mindset no matter the caliber, you had better be a dead eye because they are built on the same blueprint as the A1 Abrams tank.

3" 12 gauge magnums do not automatically get you geese. probably 1 guy in a hundred understands pass shooting. goose hunting is totally about location. we rented 512 acre grass field with about 100 acres that had been planted in barley. we went from 12 to 20 to 28 to 410 as the shooting became so boring. and one other pointer, never shoot at incoming geese, you can hear your shot rattling off of their breast feathers.
 

Roper

Idiot Savant
WFF Supporter
583 grains per ounce, velocity is definitely a factor. Us govt loads were 405 grain, I bought a mold for those, at 1800 FPS more or less, was not uncomfortable to deal with. I shoot jacketed 300 grain as the velocity is pushing beyond what I would like to shoot lead. Less recoil with the 300’s.
437 grains in a ounce...;)
 

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