Targeting "Big" redbands on the Deschutes?

DerekWhipple

Active Member
Oh it is, but then you start to think about bringing it along "Just to reach that one slot that I can't quite roll cast to". And then you can't just walk past all the juicy mid river water without making a cast. Then one day you'll "accidentally" leave the nymph rod in camp and before you know it you're plunking hot dogs for carp.

It straight up catches a lot of fish in stupid over crowded conditions. Saved my ass a couple of trips. I fish it just like I would jigs for steelhead with a lighter rod.
Well shit, now I gotta bring my streamer rod AND my centerpin rig next time...
 

Brian in OR.

Active Member
When we float from trout creek to harpam we would spook quite a few larger fish when floating down the middle of the river... Just out of reach from the bank
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Purists are going to hate this - but when I've gotten tired of fighting the wind and hiking way too many miles occasionally I will rig up a spinning setup with a slip float and get some nymphs wayyyyy out into the river at the campgrounds. Still haven't gone 20" but I've had several at 19".
Well shit, now I gotta bring my streamer rod AND my centerpin rig next time...
In my late teens I had a book that showed a couple of ways of rigging a spinning rod with a casting float and flies. I preferred a (1/8 oz translucent chartreuse) non-slip Torpedo Float with snap swivels at both ends and a UL-LT spinning setup that could cast 1/32 oz lures for high lakes. I would
usually use one fly and make long casts, let sit, twitch-retrieve; repeat. But I would also rig it for lake outlets and inlets with a dry fly above the float and wet or nymph dropper at the end. With a shorter cast I would hold the rod high and try to make the dry dap on top in the current and the wet or nymph sink during a drift.
A couple of years ago I found the book, "Fish Don't Think: How to Catch Fish Using a Fly and Bubble" written by Bob Kayne. He likes to use a (slow action) fly rod with a spinning reel.
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To avoid having to carry 2 full setups, I started carrying a fly rod and reel for use where I had room for a backcast, and added a spinning reel. I have a small compartmented fly box that is carried around the neck on a lanyard with flies, torpedo float, a couple of spare snap swivels, and a couple of spoons, (classic 1/16 oz. Daredevle with SBH always seems to work if flies don't). Works pretty well!

Might that work on the Deschutes?
 

BC33

Active Member
I never measure the fish, honestly. And yea, the D is not a big fish river, but the mature redsides, in that current, are every bit of the 20"plus bows I used to catch on the Truckee.....if you stocked the D with triploid bows, and browns, there'd be toads just like all the other places with non-native fish.
 

HawaiianInWa

Blind Casters Anonymous
"hot dogs for carp". Love this forum. Hotdog straight up kills it regardless of species. Even bonefish love em'.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I never measure the fish, honestly. And yea, the D is not a big fish river, but the mature redsides, in that current, are every bit of the 20"plus bows I used to catch on the Truckee.....if you stocked the D with triploid bows, and browns, there'd be toads just like all the other places with non-native fish.


This is true Deschutes Redsides are very strong for their size. The hottest rainbows i ever caught were from Ennis lake.. A 20 inches there will get you into your backing on the first run, but after that you just bring them in. 14 inch Deschutes Redsides fight you all the way , then threaten to rip your head off if you don't release them right away.
 

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